Chapter
1 Yamakavagga 2 Appamadavagga 3 Cittavagga 4 Pupphavagga 5 Balavagga 6 Panditavagga 7 Arahantavagga 8 Sahassavagga 9 Papavagga 10 Dandavagga 11 Jaravagga 12 Attavagga 13 Lokavagga
14 Buddhavagga 15 Sukhavagga 16 Piyavagga 17 Kodhavagga 18 Malavagga 19 Dhammatthavagga 20 Maggavagga 21 Pakinnakavagga 22 Nirayavagga 23 Nagavagga 24 Tanhavagga 25 Bhikkhuvagga 26 Brahmanavagga
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter TRANSLATOR TRANSLATOR TRANSLATOR
Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
I Yamaka
vagga
Pairs Twin Verses Twin Verses The Twin Verses The Pairs The Twin Verses The Pairs The Pairs Pairs The Twin Truths Twin Verses Couplets
#mind 1 1. Mind precedes all mental states. Mind is their chief; they are all mind-wrought. If with an impure mind a person speaks or acts suffering follows him like the wheel that follows the foot of the ox. 1. All mental phenomena have mind as their forerunner; they have mind as their chief; they are mind-made. If one speaks or acts with evil intentions, suffering will follow, just as the wheels of a cart follow the oxen that pull it along. 1.All states arising have mind for their causing,
Mind for their master, of mind are the offspring.
He who with foul mind speaks or does action—
Him pain pursues as the wheel dogs the ox-hoof.
1. All the phenomena of existence have mind as their precursor, mind as their supreme leader, and of mind are they made. If with an impure mind one speaks or acts, suffering follows him in the same way as the wheel follows the foot of the drawer (of the chariot). Mind precedes its objects. They are mind-governed and mind-made. To speak or act with a defiled mind is to draw pain after oneself, like a wheel behind the feet of the animal drawing it. 1 1. All that we are is the result of what we have thought: it is founded on our thoughts, it is made up of our thoughts. If a man speaks or acts with an evil thought, pain follows him, as the wheel follows the foot of the ox that draws the carriage. (1) All mental phenomena are preceded by mind,
Mind is their master, they are produced by mind.
If somebody speaks or acts
With a corrupted mind,
Hence suffering follows him,
Like the wheel the foot of the bearing animal.
Mind foreruns all mental conditions, Mind is chief, mind-made are they; If one speaks or acts with a wicked mind, Then suffering follows him Even as the wheel, the hoof of the ox. 1. Experiences are preceded by mind, led by mind, and produced by mind. If one speaks or acts with an impure mind, suffering follows even as the cart- wheel follows the hoof of the ox (drawing the cart). 1 . Mind it is which gives to things their quality, their foundation, and their being : whoso speaks or acts with impure mind, him sorrow dogs, as the wheel follows the steps of the draught-ox. Mind precedes all knowables,
mind's their chief, mind-made are they.
If with a corrupted mind
one should either speak or act
dukkha follows caused by that,
as does the wheel the ox's hoof.
1. Mind is the forerunner of (all evil) states. Our life is the creation of our mind. If one speaks or acts with impure mind, suffering follows one as the wheel of the cart follows the draught-ox that draws the cart. (1)
2 2. Mind precedes all mental states. Mind is their chief; they are all mind-wrought. If with a pure mind a person speaks or acts happiness follows him like his never-departing shadow. 2. All mental phenomena have mind as their forerunner; they have mind as their chief; they are mind-made. If one speaks or acts with pure intentions, happiness will follow, like a shadow that never leaves one’s side. 2.All states arising have mind for their causing,
Mind for their master, of mind are the offspring.
He who with pure mind speaks or does action—
Him bliss pursues, to him clings like his shadow.
2. All the phenomena of existence have mind as their precursor, mind as their supreme leader, and of mind are they made. If with a pure mind one speaks or acts, happiness follows him like his shadow that never leaves him. Mind precedes its objects. They are mind-governed and mind-made. To speak or act with a peaceful mind, is to draw happiness after oneself, like an inseparable shadow. 2 2. All that we are is the result of what we have thought: it is founded on our thoughts, it is made up of our thoughts. If a man speaks or acts with a pure thought, happiness follows him, like a shadow that never leaves him. (2) All things are preceded by mind,
Mind is their master, they are produced by mind.
If somebody speaks or acts
With a purified mind,
Hence happiness follows him,
Like never departing shadow.
Mind foreruns all mental conditions, Mind is chief, mind-made are they; If one speaks or acts with a pure mind, Then happiness follows him Even as the shadow that never leaves. 2. Experiences are preceded by mind, led by mind, and produced by mind. If one speaks or acts with a pure mind, happiness follows like a shadow that never departs. 2. Mind it is which gives to things their quality, their foundation, and their being : whoso speaks or acts with purified mind, him happiness accom- panies as his faithful shadow. Mind precedes all knowables,
mind's their chief, mind-made are they.
If with a clear, and confident mind
one should speak and act
happiness follows caused by that,
as one's shadow ne'er departing.
2. Mind is the forerunner of (all good) states. Our life is the creation of our mind. If one speaks or acts with pure mind, happiness follows one as his own shadows that never leaves. (2)
#hatred 3 3. "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me." Those who harbor such thoughts do not still their hatred. 3. “He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me” — those who dwell on such thoughts will never become free from hatred. 3."This man abused me: he beat me and conquered,
Conquered and plundered."
Cherishing in such thoughts,
Never appeased is the hatred of such men.
3. The hatred of those who harbor such ill feelings as, "He reviled me, assaulted me, vanquished me and robbed me," is never appeased. I have been insulted! I have been hurt! I have been beaten! I have been robbed! Anger does not cease in those who harbour this sort of thought. 3 3. "He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me,"--in those who harbour such thoughts hatred will never cease. (3) He abused me, he beat me,
He defeated me, he robbed me.
Those, who harbour such thoughts,
Their hatred is not appeased.
He abused me, he beat me, He defeated me, he robbed me,' In those who harbour such thoughts Hatred never ceases 3. Those who entertain such thoughts as ‘He abused me, he beat me, he conquered me, he robbed me,’ will not still their hatred. 3. "He has abused me, beaten me, worsted me, robbed me " ; those who dwell upon such thoughts never lose their hate, Who bears within them enmity:
"He has abused and beaten me,
defeated me and plundered me",
hate is not allayed for them.
3. "He insulted me, he hurt me, he defeated me, and he deprived me". Those who harbor such thoughts will not be free from hatred. (3)
4 4. "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me." Those who do not harbor such thoughts still their hatred. 4. “He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me” — those who do not dwell on such thoughts will truly become free from hatred. 4."This man abused me, he beat me and conquered,
Conquered and plundered."
Not having such thoughts,
Quickly appeased is the hatred of such men.
4. The hatred of those who do not harbor such ill feelings as, "He reviled me, assaulted me, vanquished me and robbed me," is easily pacified. I have been insulted! I have been hurt! I have been beaten! I have been robbed! Anger ceases in those who do not harbour this sort of thought. 4 4. "He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me,"--in those who do not harbour such thoughts hatred will cease. (4) He abused me, he beat me,
He defeated me, he robbed me.
Those, who do not harbour such thoughts,
Their hatred is appeased.
He abused me, he beat me, He defeated me, he robbed me' In those who harbour not such thoughts Hatred finds its end. 4. Those who do not entertain such thoughts as ‘He abused me, he beat me, he conquered me, he robbed me,’ will still their hatred. 4. " He has abused me, beaten me, worsted me, robbed me " ; those who dwell not upon such thoughts are freed of hate. Who bears within no enmity:
"He has abused and beaten me,
defeated me and plundered me",
hate is quite allayed for them.
4. "He insulted me, he hurt me, he defeated me, and he deprived me". Those who do not harbor such thoughts will be free from hatred. (4)
5 5. Hatred is never appeased by hatred in this world. By non-hatred alone is hatred appeased. This is a law eternal. 5. Returning hatred with hatred will never bring hatred to an end in this world; only by replacing hatred with love will hatred come to an end. This is an ancient and eternal law. 5.Never by hatred is hatred appeaséd
Nay! but by kindness; that's the old-time Norm.
5. Through hatred, hatreds are never appeased; through non-hatred are hatreds always appeased — and this is a law eternal. Occasions of hatred are certainly never settled by hatred. They are settled by freedom from hatred. This is the eternal law. 5 5. For hatred does not cease by hatred at any time: hatred ceases by love, this is an old rule. (5) Hatred is indeed never appeased by hatred here.
It is appeased by non-hatred - this law is eternal.
At any time in this world, Hatred never ceases by hatred, But through non-hatred it ceases This is an eternal law. 5. Not by hatred are hatreds ever pacified here (in the world). They are pacified by love. This is the eternal law. 5. Never does hatred cease by hating ; by not hating does it cease : this is the ancient law. Never here by enmity
are those with enmity allayed,
they are allayed by amity,
this is the timeless Truth.
5. Hatred never ceases through hatred in this world, but ceases through not hating only. This is an eternal law. (5)
#disputes 6 6. There are those who do not realize that one day we all must die. But those who do realize this settle their quarrels. 6. People do not understand that quarrelsome behavior leads only to self-destruction; for those who realize this, quarrels quickly come to an end. 6.Others don't grasp this—
"We men are mortals".
Men who can grasp this soon end their quarrels.
6. Most people never realize that all of us here shall one day perish. But those who do realize that truth settle their quarrels peacefully. Others may not understand that we must practice self-control, but quarrelling dies away in those who understand this fact. 6 6. The world does not know that we must all come to an end here;--but those who know it, their quarrels cease at once. (6) The others do not understand that we should restrain ourselves here.
Those who understand that, therefore appease their quarrels.
The common people know not That in this quarrel they will perish, But those who realize this truth Have their quarrels calmed thereby. 6. Others do not realize that we are all heading for death. Those who do realize it will compose their quarrels. 6. If some there are who know not by such hatred we are perishing, and some there are who know it, then by their knowledge strife is ended. Still others do not understand
that we must perish in this world,
those who understand this,
there quarrels are allayed.
6. Many people do not know that we perish in quarrels. Those who realize it do not quarrel with each other. (6)
#sensual pleasures 7 7. Just as a storm throws down a weak tree, so does Mara overpower the man who lives for the pursuit of pleasures, who is uncontrolled in his senses, immoderate in eating, indolent, and dissipated. 7. Just as a strong wind uproots a weak tree, so, whoever lives strictly for pleasure, who exercises no restraint over the senses, who eats to excess, who is lazy, who is inactive, such a one is easily overpowered by Māra — the Tempter, the Evil One. 7.Looking for fair sights, unchecked in his senses,
In food uncontrolled, slack, inert, without vigour,
Death overwhelms him, as winds uproot weak trees.
7. The pleasure-seeker who finds delight in physical objects, whose senses are unsubdued, who is immoderate in eating, indolent and listless, him Mara (the Evil One) prevails against, as does the monsoon wind against a weak-rooted tree. The Tempter masters the lazy and irresolute man who dwells on the attractive side of things, ungoverned in his senses, and unrestrained in his food, like the wind overcomes a rotten tree. 7 7. He who lives looking for pleasures only, his senses uncontrolled, immoderate in his food, idle, and weak, Mara (the tempter) will certainly overthrow him, as the wind throws down a weak tree. (7) The person, who lives contemplating pleasant things, who is not restrained in senses,
Who does not know moderation in food, who is indolent and of poor effort,
Mara will overcome him, as wind a weak tree.
As the wind overthrows a weak tree, So does Mara overpower him Who lives attached to sense pleasures, Who lives with his senses uncontrolled, Who knows not moderation in his food, And who is indolent and inactive. 7. As the wind blows down a weak tree, so Mara overthrows one who lives seeing the (unlovely as) lovely, whose senses are uncontrolled, who is immoderate in food, lazy, and of inferior vigour. 7. As the wind throws down a shaky tree, so Mara [Death] o'erwhelms him who is a seeker after vanity, uncontrolled, intemperate, slothful, and effeminate. One who beauty contemplates,
whose faculties are unrestrained,
in food no moderation knows,
is languid, who is indolent:
that one does Mara overthrow
as wind a tree of little strength.
7. Whoever lives for pleasures, with unrestrained sensual desires and with excessive food are idle and lack of virtues. He is over-powered by Mara, just as a weak tree is blown over by the wind. (7)
8 8. Just as a storm cannot prevail against a rocky mountain, so Mara can never overpower the man who lives meditating on the impurities, who is controlled in his senses, moderate in eating, and filled with faith and earnest effort. 8. Just as the wind cannot blow away a rocky mountain, so, whoever does not live strictly for pleasure, who exercises restraint over the senses, who does not eat to excess, who is full of faith, who disciplines the will, such a one is not overpowered by Māra. 8.He who lives sense-restrained, heedless of fair sights,
Who in food keeps the mean, is trusty and sturdy,
Death cannot shake him: winds cannot move mountains.
8. He who perceives no pleasure in physical objects, who has perfect control of his senses, is moderate in eating, who is unflinching in faith, energetic, him Mara does not prevail against any more than does the wind against a rocky mountain. But the Tempter cannot master a man who dwells on the distasteful side of things, self-controlled in his senses, moderate in eating, resolute and full of faith, like the wind cannot move a mountain crag. 8 8. He who lives without looking for pleasures, his senses well controlled, moderate in his food, faithful and strong, him Mara will certainly not overthrow, any more than the wind throws down a rocky mountain. (8) The one, who does not live contemplating pleasant things, who is well restrained in senses,
Who does know moderation in food, who is trusting and firm in effort,
Mara will not overcome him, as wind a rocky mountain.
As the wind does not overthrow a rocky mount, So Mara indeed does not overpower him Who lives unattached to sense pleasures, Who lives with his sense well-controlled, Who knows moderation in his food, And who is full of faith and high vitality. 8. As the wind does not blow down the rocky mountain peak, so Mara does not overthrow one who lives seeing the (unlovely as) unlovely, whose senses are controlled, who is moderate in food, and whose faith and vigour are aroused. 8. But whoso keeps his eyes from vanity, con- trolled and temperate, faithful and strenuous, Mara cannot overthrow, as the wind beating against a rocky crag. One who foulness contemplates,
whose faculties are well-restrained,
in food does moderation know,
is full of faith, who's diligent:
that one no Mara overthrows,
as wind does not a rocky mount.
8. Whoever lives not for pleasures, with restrained sensual desires and with moderate food is in good faith and full of virtues. He is not over-powered by Mara, just as a rocky mountain is not shaken by the wind. (8)
#purity 9 9. Whoever being depraved, devoid of self-control and truthfulness, should don the monk's yellow robe, he surely is not worthy of the robe. 9. Though one may put on the saffron-colored robe, if one has not removed impurities from the mind, if one is lacking in self-discipline and truthfulness, then such a one is not worthy of wearing the saffron-colored robe. 9-10.Without doffing his faults who would don the monk's yellow,
Void of truth and of training, deserves not the monk's robe.
If he doff all his faults and be versed in the virtues,
In the training and truth firm, he merits the monk's robe.
9. He who dons the yellow robe without even cleansing himself of sensuality, who is devoid of self-restraint and truthfulness, is indeed not fit for the yellow robe. The man who wears the yellow-dyed robe but is not free from stains himself, without self-restraint and integrity, is unworthy of the robe. 9 9. He who wishes to put on the yellow dress without having cleansed himself from sin, who disregards temperance and truth, is unworthy of the yellow dress. (9) Who is not rid of defilement, and will wear a yellow robe,
Devoid of restraint and truth, he does not deserve a yellow robe.
Whosoever, not freed from defilements, Without self-control and truthfulness, Should put on the yellow robe - He is not worthy of it. 9. He is not worthy of the yellow robe who takes it (while still) not free from impurity, and lacking in self-restraint and truth. 9. Though an impure man don the pure yellow robe [of the Bhikkhu], himself unindued with temperance and truth, he is not worthy of the pure yellow robe. One who wears the stainless robe
who's yet not free from stain,
without restraint and truthfulness
for the stainless robe's unfit.
9. Whoever is impure without self-control and truthfulness, not worthy of the pure yellow robe that he wears. (9)
10 10. But whoever is purged of depravity, well-established in virtues and filled with self-control and truthfulness, he indeed is worthy of the yellow robe. 10. Whoever has purified the mind, who is firmly established in moral behavior, who possesses self-discipline and truthfulness, that one is indeed worthy of wearing the saffron-colored robe. 10. He who is purged of all sensuality, firmly established in moral virtues, possessed of self-restraint and truthfulness, is indeed fit for the yellow robe. But the man who has freed himself of stains and has found peace of mind in an upright life, possessing self-restraint and integrity, he is indeed worthy of the dyed robe. 10 10. But he who has cleansed himself from sin, is well grounded in all virtues, and regards also temperance and truth, he is indeed worthy of the yellow dress. (10) And who would get rid of defilement, well settled in virtues,
Endowed with restraint and truth, he deserves a yellow robe.
But he who has discarded defilements, Firmly established in moral precepts, Possessed of self-control and truth, is indeed worthy of the yellow robe. 10. He is worthy of the yellow robe who has made an end to all impurity, who is well established in virtuous conduct (sila), and who is endowed with self- restraint and truth. 10. He who has doffed his impurities, calm and clothed upon with temperance and truth, he wears the pure robe worthily. But one who is self-cleansed of stain,
in moral conduct firmly set,
having restraint and truthfulness
is fit for the stainless robe.
10. Whoever is pure, well established in morals and endowed with self -control and truthfulness, is worthy of the pure yellow robe that he wears. (10)
#delusion 11 11. Those who mistake the unessential to be essential and the essential to be unessential, dwelling in wrong thoughts, never arrive at the essential. 11. Those who imagine trivial things to be important or important things to be trivial are blinded by such wrong views and will never realize what is truly essential to living the Holy Life. 11-12. In the false seeing truth, and in truth seeing falsehood,
Men touch not the truth, but are fed on illusion.
But in truth seeing truth and falsehood in falsehood,
Men touch the truth ever, feeding on right thoughts.
11. Those who take the non-real for the real and the real for the non-real and thus fall victims to erroneous notions, never reach the essence of reality. To see the essence in the unessential and to see the essence as unessential means one can never get to the essence, wandering as one is in the road of wrong intentions. 11 11. They who imagine truth in untruth, and see untruth in truth, never arrive at truth, but follow vain desires. (11) Thinking to be essential, what is not, seeing no essence in what is essential,
they, feeding on wrong thoughts, do not discover the essence.
In the unessential they imagine the essential, In the essential they see the unessential; They who feed on wrong thoughts as such Never achieve the essential. 11. Those who take the unreal for the real, and who in the real see the unreal, they, wandering in the sphere of wrong thought, will not attain the real. 11. Those who mistake the shadow for the substance, and the substance for the shadow, never attain the reality, following wandering fires [lit. followers of a false pursuit]. Conceiving the real in unreality
while seeing unreal the truly real,
roaming fields of thoughts ill-formed:
never they at the real arrive.
11. What is unessential they regard as essential, and what is essential they regard as unessential; they shall never realize the truth, and get lost in the path of false thinking. (11)
12 12. Those who know the essential to be essential and the unessential to be unessential, dwelling in right thoughts, do arrive at the essential. 12. Those who have correctly understood what is trivial and what is important are not blinded by wrong views and have realized what is truly essential to living the Holy Life. 12. Having realized the essential as the essential and the nonessential as the nonessential, they by thus following correct thinking attain the essential. But to see the essence in the essential and the unessential as the unessential it is means one does get to the essence, being on the road of right intentions. 12 12. They who know truth in truth, and untruth in untruth, arrive at truth, and follow true desires. (12) Having known the essence as the essence, non-essential as non-essential,
they, feeding on right thoughts, discover the essence.
Knowing the essential as the essential, And the unessential as the unessential, They who feed on right thoughts as such Achieve the essential. 12. Those who have known the real as the real, and the unreal as the unreal, they, moving in the sphere of right thought, will attain the real. 12. But if a man knows the substance and the shadow as they are, he attains the reality, following the true trail. That which is real they know as real,
that unreal, to be unreal;
roaming fields of thought well-formed
they at the real arrive.
12. What is essential they regard as essential, and what is unessential they regard as unessential; they shall realize the truth and keep on in the path of right thinking. (12)
#mind 13 13. Just as rain breaks through an ill-thatched house, so passion penetrates an undeveloped mind. 13. Just as rain seeps through an ill-thatched roof, so does lust seep through an ill-trained mind. 13-14.As the rain through the roof of a house that is ill-thatched,
Lust leaks through the mind not composed by the training:
As rain never leaks through the roof that is well-thatched,
So through the mind well-trained lust leaketh never.
13. As the monsoon rain pierces through the roof of an ill-thatched house, so lust enters the undisciplined mind. In the same way that rain breaks into a house with a bad roof, desire breaks into the mind that has not been practising meditation. 13 13. As rain breaks through an ill-thatched house, passion will break through an unreflecting mind. (13) As a poorly covered house is penetrated by a rain,
thus an undeveloped mind is penetrated by passion.
Even as rain gets into an ill-thatched house, Even so lust penetrates an undeveloped mind. 13. As the rain penetrates the badly thatched house, so lust enters the (spiritually) undeveloped mind. 13. As the rain pours into the ill-thatched house, so lust pours into the undisciplined mind. Even as the rain does penetrate
a house that's badly thatched,
likewise lust does penetrate
the mind uncultivated.
13. Even as rain leaks into a poorly roof house, so passions will penetrate an uncultivated mind. (13)
14 14. Just as rain does not break through a well-thatched house, so passion never penetrates a well-developed mind. 14. Just as rain cannot seep through a well-thatched roof, so can lust not seep through a well-trained mind. 14. As the monsoon rain does not enter a well-thatched house, so lust does not enter a well-disciplined mind. While in the same way that rain cannot break into a well-roofed house, desire cannot break into a mind that has been practising meditation well. 14 14. As rain does not break through a well-thatched house, passion will not break through a well-reflecting mind. (14) As a well covered house is not penetrated by a rain,
thus a well developed mind is not penetrated by passion.
Even as rain gets not into a well-thatched house, Even so lust penetrates not a well-developed mind. 14. As the rain does not penetrate into the well-thatched house, so lust does not enter the (spiritually) well-developed mind. 14. As rain cannot enter the well-thatched house, so lust finds no entry into the disciplined mind. As rain does never penetrate
a house that is well-thatched,
so lust does never penetrate
the mind well cultivated.
14. Even as rain does not leak into a well-roofed house, so passions will not penetrate a cultivated mind. (14)
#actions 15 15. The evil-doer grieves here and hereafter; he grieves in both the worlds. He laments and is afflicted, recollecting his own impure deeds. 15. Perceiving the results of past wrong actions, those who have done evil suffer — those who have done evil are afflicted; indeed, they suffer here and now, even after death they suffer — they suffer in both places. 15.Here he grieves and grieves hereafter: doubly grieves the evil-doer,
Grieves and suffers anguish when he sees the foulness of his deeds.
15. The sinner laments here, laments hereafter, and he laments in both worlds. Having seen himself sullied by his sinful deeds, the evildoer grieves and is afflicted. Here and beyond he suffers. The wrong-doer suffers both ways. He suffers and is tormented to see his own depraved behaviour. 15 15. The evil-doer mourns in this world, and he mourns in the next; he mourns in both. He mourns and suffers when he sees the evil of his own work. (15) He grieves here, he grieves after death, in both states does the wrongdoer grieve.
He grieves, he is vexed, having seen his own evil deeds.
Here he grieves, hereafter he grieves, In both worlds the evil-doer grieves, He mourns, he is afflicted, Beholding his own impure deeds. 15. The evildoer grieves in both worlds; he grieves ‘here’ and he grieves ‘there’. He suffers and torments himself seeing his own foul deeds. 15. Here and hereafter the sinner mourns : yea mourns and is in torment, knowing the vileness of his deeds. Here one grieves, one grieves hereafter,
in both ways does the evil-doer grieve;
one grieves and is afflicted,
one's own base kammas seeing.
15. Here he grieves, and hereafter he grieves. The man who does evil suffers in both cases. He grieves, and he is afflicted perceiving the impurities of his own deeds. (15)
16 16. The doer of good rejoices here and hereafter; he rejoices in both the worlds. He rejoices and exults, recollecting his own pure deeds. 16. Perceiving the results of past wholesome actions, those who have done good deeds rejoice, they rejoice exceedingly; indeed, they rejoice here and now, even after death they rejoice — they rejoice in both places. 16.Happy here, he's happy after: doing good he's doubly glad:
Glad, exceeding happy, when he sees the pureness of his deeds.
16. The doer of wholesome deeds rejoices here and rejoices hereafter; thus he rejoices in both places. Having beheld his pure deeds he rejoices exceedingly. Here and beyond he is glad. The doer of good is glad both ways. He is glad and rejoices to see his own good deeds. 16 16. The virtuous man delights in this world, and he delights in the next; he delights in both. He delights and rejoices, when he sees the purity of his own work. (16) He rejoices here, he rejoices after death, in both states does the well-doer rejoice.
He rejoices, he is happy, having seen his own good deeds.
Here he rejoices, hereafter he rejoices In both worlds the well-doer rejoices He rejoices, exceedingly rejoices, Seeing his own pure deeds. 16. The doer of good rejoices in both (worlds); he rejoices ‘here’ and he rejoices ‘there’. He rejoices and is glad seeing his own pure deeds. 16. Here and hereafter the good man is glad: yea is glad and rejoices, knowing that his deeds are pure. Here one joys, one joys hereafter,
in both ways does the merit-maker joy;
one joys and one rejoices,
one's own pure kammas seeing.
16. Here he rejoices, and hereafter he rejoices. The man who does good rejoices in both cases. He rejoices, and exceedingly rejoices perceiving the purity of his own deeds. (16)
17 17. The evil-doer suffers here and hereafter; he suffers in both the worlds. The thought, "Evil have I done," torments him, and he suffers even more when gone to realms of woe. 17. Those who have done evil suffer here and now, even after death they suffer — the evildoers suffer in both places. Realizing the results of the wrong they have done, the evildoers suffer; and still more suffering awaits them in the next life. 17.Here he suffers, suffers after: doubly suffer evil-doers:
Thoughts of ill-deeds torture, much more torture when they enter hell.
17. He repents here, repents hereafter, the evildoer repents in both worlds. "Evil has been committed by me," thinking thus he repents. Having taken the path of evil he repents even more. Here and beyond he is punished. The wrong-doer is punished both ways. He is punished by the thought, "I have done evil", and is even more punished when he comes to a bad state. 17 17. The evil-doer suffers in this world, and he suffers in the next; he suffers in both. He suffers when he thinks of the evil he has done; he suffers more when going on the evil path. (17) He is tormented here, he is tormented after death, in both states is the wrongdoer tormented.
He is tormented [by the thought] "I have done evil". He is tormented even more, having gone to a bad birth.
Here he laments, hereafter he laments In both worlds the evil-doer laments; Thinking: Evil have I done,' thus he laments. Furthermore he laments, When gone to a state of woe. 17. The evildoer burns in both (worlds); he burns ‘here’ and he burns ‘there’. He burns (with remorse) thinking he has done evil, and he burns (with suffering) having gone (after death) to an evil state. 17. Here and hereafter the sinner is in torment : tormented by the thought " I have sinned " ; yea rather tormented when he goes to hell. Here one burns, one burns hereafter,
in both ways does the evil-doer burn;
evil I've done, remorsefully one burns,
and more one burns passed to realms of woe.
17. Here he suffers, and hereafter he suffers. The man who does evil suffers in both cases. "I have done evil", (thinking thus) he suffers. Furthermore, he suffers on the path of suffering. (17)
18 18. The doer of good delights here and hereafter; he delights in both the worlds. The thought, "Good have I done," delights him, and he delights even more when gone to realms of bliss. 18. Those who have done good are happy here and now, even after death they are happy — those who have done good are happy in both places. Realizing the results of the good they have done, they are happy; and still more happiness awaits them in the next life. 18.He rejoices here and after: doing good he's doubly glad:
Thoughts of good deeds comfort, much more comfort when they enter heaven.
18. He rejoices here, he rejoices hereafter, the doer of wholesome deeds rejoices in both worlds. "Good has been committed by me," thinking thus he rejoices. Having taken the celestial path, he rejoices exceedingly. Here and beyond he rejoices. The doer of good rejoices both way. He rejoices at the thought, "I have done good", and rejoices even more when he comes to a happy state. 18 18. The virtuous man is happy in this world, and he is happy in the next; he is happy in both. He is happy when he thinks of the good he has done; he is still more happy when going on the good path. (18) He is delighted here, he is delighted after death, in both states is the well-doer delighted.
He is delighted [by the thought] "I have done good". He is delighted even more, having gone to a good birth.
Here he is happy, hereafter he is happy, In both worlds the well-doer is happy Thinking: Good have I done,' thus he is happy Furthermore he is happy, When gone to the state of bliss. 18. The doer of good delights in both (worlds); he delights ‘here’ and he delights ‘there’. He delights (in this life) thinking he has done good and he delights (after death) having gone to a state of happiness. 18. Here and hereafter the good man rejoices ; rejoices as he thinks " I have done well " : yea rather rejoices when he goes to a heaven. Here one's glad, one's glad hereafter,
in both ways is the merit-maker glad;
'Merit I've made', serenely one is glad,
and more one's glad passed to blissful states.
18. Here he is happy, and hereafter he is happy. The man who does good rejoices in both cases. "I have done good", (thinking thus), he is happy. Furthermore, he is happy on the path of joy. (18)
#practice 19 19. Much though he recites the sacred texts, but acts not accordingly, that heedless man is like a cowherd who only counts the cows of others -- he does not partake of the blessings of the holy life. 19. Though one may be well-versed in the scriptures and be able to recite them from beginning to end, if one does not put into practice their teachings, then such a heedless one may be likened to a cowherd who counts someone else’s cattle — that one will gain none of the benefits of living the Holy Life. 19.Though reciting many verses,if they do not what they preach,
Sluggards, counting others' cattle, cannot share the Brotherhood.
19. A heedless man, though he utters much of the Canon, but does not act accordingly, is like unto a cowherd who counts the cattle of others. He is, verily, not a sharer of the fruit of the monastic life. Even if he is fond of quoting appropriate texts, the thoughtless man who does not put them into practice himself is like cowherd counting other people's cows, not a partner in the Holy Life. 19 19. The thoughtless man, even if he can recite a large portion (of the law), but is not a doer of it, has no share in the priesthood, but is like a cowherd counting the cows of others. (19) Even if he recites a lot of scriptures, but does not act accordingly, the negligent man.
He is like a cowherd who counts others' cows. He does not share the [blessings of] monkshood.
Though much he recites the Sacred Texts, But acts not accordingly. That heedless man Is like the cowherd who counts other's kine; He has no share in religious life. 19. He who for his own benefit constantly recites the (canonical) literature but does not act accordingly, that heedless man, like a cowherd that counts the cows of others, is not enriched by the asketic life. 19. If a man is a great preacher of the sacred text, but slothful and no doer of it, he is a hire- ling shepherd, who has no part in the flock. Though many sacred texts he chants
the heedless man's no practicer,
as cowherd counting other's kine
in samanaship he has no share.
19. If a man recites the holy books, but does not practice accordingly, this thoughtless man cannot share the enjoyment of the holy life. He is like a cowherd who counts the cows of others. (19)
20 20. Little though he recites the sacred texts, but puts the Teaching into practice, forsaking lust, hatred, and delusion, with true wisdom and emancipated mind, clinging to nothing of this or any other world -- he indeed partakes of the blessings of a holy life. 20. Though one may know little of the scriptures, if one nonetheless puts into practice their teachings, forsaking lust, hatred, and false views, truly knowing, with a disciplined mind, clinging to nothing either in this life or the next, then that one will surely gain the benefits of living the Holy Life. 20.Practising the Norm he preaches, though he utter verses few,
Quit of anger, lust and folly, truly wise, with thoughts set free,
Caring nought for this or that world, he hath part in brotherhood.
20. A man, though he recites only a little of the Canon, but acts according to the precepts of the Sacred Law, who, having got rid of lust, hatred and delusion, has firmly established himself in liberated thought, and clinging to no worldly possessions here or hereafter — such a one becomes indeed a sharer of the true fruit of the monastic life. Even if he does not quote appropriate texts much, if he follows the principles of the Teaching by getting rid of greed, hatred and delusion, deep of insight and with a mind free from attachment, not clinging to anything in this world or the next -- that man is a partner in the Holy Life. 20 20. The follower of the law, even if he can recite only a small portion (of the law), but, having forsaken passion and hatred and foolishness, possesses true knowledge and serenity of mind, he, caring for nothing in this world or that to come, has indeed a share in the priesthood. (20) Even if he recites a little of scriptures, but lives in truth according to the Dharma,
having abandoned lust, hatred and delusion, has the right knowledge,
with a well emancipated mind,
is not attached to anything, either in this world, nor in the other one,
he shares the [blessings of] monkshood.
Though little he recites the Sacred Texts, But puts the precepts into practice, Ridding himself of craving, hatred and delusion, Possessed of right knowledge with mind well-freed, Cling to nothing here or hereafter, He has a share in religious life. 20. He who for his own benefit recites even a little of the (canonical) literature but lives in accordance with its principles, abandoning craving, hatred, and delusion, possessed of right knowledge, with mind well freed, clinging to nothing in this or any other world, he is enriched by the asketic life. 20. If a man preaches but a little of the text and practises the teaching, putting away lust and hatred and infatuation ; if he is truly wise and detached and seeks nothing here or here- after, his lot is with the holy ones. Though few of the sacred texts he chant
in Dhamma does his practice run,
clear of delusion, lust and hate,
wisdom perfected, with heart well-freed.
20. Whereas if a man recites only a few words in the holy books, and practices in according with the teaching. He is free from passion, hate and illusions—with right vision and a mind free, clinging to nothing here and hereafter, he shares the enjoyment of the holy life. (20)
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
II Appamada
vagga
Heedfulness Vigilance Vigilance On Vigilance Attention On Earnestness Conscientiousness Heedfulness Mindfulness Zeal Heedfulness Watchfulness
#heedfulness 1 21. Heedfulness is the path to the Deathless. Heedlessness is the path to death. The heedful die not. The heedless are as if dead already. 21. Vigilance is the way to the deathless.18 Those who lack vigilance cannot escape death. Those who are vigilant will go beyond death; those who are not vigilant are as if already dead. 21. Heedfulness leads to the Deathless; heedlessness leads unto Death!
Heedful men live on for ever; they who heed not are as dead.
21. Vigilance is the path to immortality; non-vigilance is the path to death; the vigilant do not die; the non-vigilant, though alive, are like unto the dead. Attention leads to immortality. Carelessness leads to death. Those who pay attention will not die, while the careless are as good as dead already. 21 21. Earnestness is the path of immortality (Nirvana), thoughtlessness the path of death. Those who are in earnest do not die, those who are thoughtless are as if dead already. (21) Conscientiousness is the state of deathlessness. Negligence is the state of death. The conscientious ones do not die. Those, who are negligent, are as if dead. Heedfulness is the way to the Deathless,
Heedlessness is the way to death.
The heedful do not die,
The heedless are like unto the dead.
21. Mindfulness is the Way to the Immortal, unmindfulness the way to death. Those who are mindful do not die, (whereas) the unmindful are like the dead. 21. Zeal is the way to Nirvana. Sloth is the day of death. The zealous die not : the slothful are as it were dead. Heedfulness is the Deathless path,
heedlessness, the path to death.
Those who are heedful do not die,
heedless are like the dead.
1. Vigilance is the path to immorality; negligence is the path of death. Those who are vigilant never die; those who are negligent are already as dead. (21)
#wise 2 22. Clearly understanding this excellence of heedfulness, the wise exult therein and enjoy the resort of the Noble Ones. 22. The wise fully understand this. They rejoice in being vigilant and find delight in the wisdom of the Noble Ones. 22. Knowing this full surely, wise men take delight in heedfulness;
Heedfully they range with joy the pastures of the Worthy Ones.
22. Knowing this outstanding feature of vigilance, the wise delight in vigilance, rejoicing in the ways of the Noble Ones (ariya). So having clearly understood the value of attention, wise men take pleasure in it, rejoicing in what the saints have practised. 22 22. Those who are advanced in earnestness, having understood this clearly, delight in earnestness, and rejoice in the knowledge of the Ariyas (the elect). (22) Having thus distinctively understood about conscientiousness,
the wise ones rejoice in conscientiousness, delighting in the sphere of the Noble Ones.
Realizing this distinction,
The wise rejoice in heedfulness,
Which is the way of the Noble.
22. Knowing the distinction of mindfulness the spiritually mature (panditas) rejoice in mindfulness and take delight in the sphere of the Noble Ones (ariyas). 22. The wise who know the power of zeal delight in it, rejoicing in the lot of the noble. The wise then, recognizing this
as the distinction of heedfulness,
pleased with the spheres of Nobles Ones,
in heedfulness rejoice.
2. Those who have the knowledge of vigilance rejoice being vigilant and are delighted in the realm of the Ariyas. (22)
3 23. The wise ones, ever meditative and steadfastly persevering, alone experience Nibbana, the incomparable freedom from bondage. 23. Meditating earnestly and striving for nibbāna, the wise attain the highest joy and freedom. 23. Meditative, persevering, ever with strong might endowed,
Wise men reach the Blissful Haven, reach Security Supreme.
23. Those wise ones, contemplative, ever-striving sages of great prowess, realize nirvana, the incomparable bliss of yoga (union). Those who meditate with perseverance, constantly working hard at it, are the wise who experience Nirvana, the ultimate freedom from chains. 23 23. These wise people, meditative, steady, always possessed of strong powers, attain to Nirvana, the highest happiness. (23) Those meditating perseveringly, constantly with strong effort,
those clever ones touch the Nirvana, the highest peace from bondage.
The wise, constantly meditative,
Ever earnestly persevering,
Attain the bond-free supreme Nibbana.
23. Absorbed in superconscious states (jhanas), recollected, and ever exerting themselves, those wise ones (dhiras) realize Nirvana, the unsurpassed security. 23. These wise ones by meditation and reflec- tion, by constant effort reach Nirvana, highest freedom. They meditate persistently,
constantly they firmly strive,
the steadfast to Nibbana reach,
the Unexcelled Secure from bonds.
3. And those who meditate constantly, and contemplate deeply with striving diligence, realize and attain the supreme Nirvana. (23)
#repute 4 24. Ever grows the glory of him who is energetic, mindful and pure in conduct, discerning and self-controlled, righteous and heedful. 24. If one is energetic, mindful, and pure in thought, word, and deed, and, if one does everything with care and consideration, restraining the senses, and earning a living in accordance with the Dhamma, then the fame and fortune of such a one will steadily increase. 24. Heedful men's good name increaseth, if they strive with mind subdued
Pure in deed, with thoughts well-guarded, well-controlled of lawful lives.
24. Greatly increasing is the glory of him who exerts himself, is thoughtful, pure in character, analytical, self-restrained, vigilant, and lives according to Dhamma (the Law). When a man is resolute and recollected, pure of deed and persevering, when he is attentive and self-controlled and lives according to the Teaching, his reputation is bound to grow. 24 24. If an earnest person has roused himself, if he is not forgetful, if his deeds are pure, if he acts with consideration, if he restrains himself, and lives according to law,--then his glory will increase. (24) The good repute of someone, who is energetic, mindful, of pure deeds, acting
considerately, self-controlled, living righteously and conscientious, increases.
Of him who is energetic, mindful,
Pure in deed, considerate, self-restrained,
Who lives the Dhamma and who is heedful,
Reputation steadily increases.
24. Whoever is energetic, recollected, pure in conduct, considerate, self- restrained, of righteous life, and mindful, the glory of such a one waxes exceedingly. 24. Great grows the glory of him who is zealous in meditation, whose actions are pure and deliberate, whose life is calm and righteous and full of vigour. Assiduous and mindful,
pure kamma making, considerate,
restrained, by Dhamma heedful living,
for one such spread renown.
4. One who is energetic, mindful, pure in deed, considerate, self-controlled, right living shall arise in glory. (24)
#wise 5 25. By effort and heedfulness, discipline and self-mastery, let the wise one make for himself an island which no flood can overwhelm. 25. Through diligence, mindfulness, discipline (with regard to the moral precepts), and control of the senses, let those who are wise make an island of themselves which no flood can overwhelm. 25. Let the wise man, striving, heedful, well-controlled and temperate,
Make himself an island which the flood shall never sweep away.
25. Through diligence, vigilance, self-restraint and subjugation of the senses, the wise aspirant makes an island for himself that no flood could engulf. By resolution and attention, by discipline and self-control, a clever man may build himself an island that no flood can overthrow. 25 25. By rousing himself, by earnestness, by restraint and control, the wise man may make for himself an island which no flood can overwhelm. (25) By exertion, conscientiousness, self-control and moderation,
a wise should make an island, that a flood can not overwhelm.
By diligence, vigilance,
Restraint and self-mastery,
Let the wise make for himself an island
That no flood can overwhelm.
25. By means of energy, mindfulness, self-restraint, and control, let the man of understanding (medhavi) make (for himself) an island that no flood can overwhelm. 25. By strenuous effort, by self-control, by temperance, let the wise man make for himself an island which the flood cannot overwhelm. By energy and heedfulness,
by taming and by self-control,
the one who’s wise should make as isle
no flood can overwhelm.
5. By substained effort, earnestness, discipline, and self-control, the wise makes an island for himself, which no flood overwhelms. (25)
#wise, #fool 6 26. The foolish and ignorant indulge in heedlessness, but the wise one keeps his heedfulness as his best treasure. 26. The immature lose their vigilance, but the wise guard it as their greatest treasure. 26. Heedlessness the foolish follow, men of small intelligence;
As the best of treasures wise men guard the prize of Heedfulness.
26. Thoughtless men of great ignorance sink into negligence. But the wise man guards vigilance as his supreme treasure. Foolish, ignorant people indulge in careless lives, whereas a clever man guards his attention as his most precious possession. 26 26. Fools follow after vanity, men of evil wisdom. The wise man keeps earnestness as his best jewel (26) The fools, the ignorant people give themselves up to negligence.
And the wise one protects conscientiousness as the greatest treasure.
The ignorant, foolish folk
Indulge in heedlessness,
But the wise preserve heedfulness
As their greatest treasure.
26. Out of their evil understanding the spiritually immature (balas) abandon themselves to unmindfulness. The man of understanding guards mindfulness as his chief treasure. 26. Fools in their folly give themselves to sloth : the wise man guards his vigour as his greatest possession. Foolish folk of little wit
in heedlessness indulge,
the one who’s wise guards heedfulness
kin to the greatest wealth.
6. One who is ignorant and foolish is never vigilant. The wise man who lives in vigilance considers it as his greatest treasure. (26)
#wise, #happiness 7 27. Do not give way to heedlessness. Do not indulge in sensual pleasures. Only the heedful and meditative attain great happiness. 27. Therefore, do not be negligent, do not become addicted to sensory pleasures. Those who meditate earnestly attain the highest happiness. 27. Cleave not thou to Heedlessness, cleave not thou to Passion's snares;
Strenuous and meditative, wisdom winneth widespread bliss.
27. Betake yourselves not unto negligence; do not indulge in sensuous pleasures. For the vigilant and thoughtful aspirant acquires an amplitude of bliss. Don't indulge in careless behaviour. Don't be the friend of sensual pleasures. He who meditates attentively attains abundant joy. 27 27. Follow not after vanity, nor after the enjoyment of love and lust! He who is earnest and meditative, obtains ample joy. (27) Don't pursue negligence or intimacy with pleasure delights.
Conscientious practitioner of meditation obtains abundant happiness.
Devote not yourselves to negligence;
Have no intimacy with sensuous delights.
The vigilant meditative person
Attain sublime Bliss.
27. Do not abandon yourselves to unmindfulness; have no intimacy with sensuous delights. The mindful person, absorbed in superconscious states, gains ample bliss. 27. Give not yourselves over to sloth, and to dalliance with delights : he who meditates with earnestness attains great joy. Don’t indulge in heedlessness!
Don’t come near to sexual joys!
The heedful and contemplative
attains abundant bliss.
7. Do not indulge in negligence; do not have intimacy with sensuous delights. The vigilant one in earnest meditation obtains abundant bliss. (27)
#wise 8 28. Just as one upon the summit of a mountain beholds the groundlings, even so when the wise man casts away heedlessness by heedfulness and ascends the high tower of wisdom, this sorrowless sage beholds the sorrowing and foolish multitude. 28. Overcoming negligence through mindfulness, the wise climb beyond suffering to the peaks of wisdom. They look upon the suffering multitude as one standing on a mountaintop looks upon the plains below. 28. Lo! the sage that drives away the cloud of sloth by Heedfulness,
Climbing up the heights of wisdom, sorrowless looks down upon
All the miserable beings, as a hillman on the plains.
28. When the wise man casts off laxity through vigilance, he is like unto a man who, having ascended the high tower of wisdom, looks upon the sorrowing people with an afflicted heart. He beholds suffering ignorant men as a mountaineer beholds people in a valley. When a wise man has carefully rid himself of carelessness and climbed the High Castle of Wisdom, sorrowless he observes sorrowing people, like a clear-sighted man on a mountain top looking down on the people with limited vision on the ground below. 28 28. When the learned man drives away vanity by earnestness, he, the wise, climbing the terraced heights of wisdom, looks down upon the fools, serene he looks upon the toiling crowd, as one that stands on a mountain looks down upon them that stand upon the plain. (28) When the wise one expels negligence by conscientiousness,
having climbed the stronghold of wisdom, without sorrow,
such a clever one observes the sorrowing crowd
as somebody standing on a mountain observes the foolish people on the ground.
When the wise man banishes carelessness by carefulness,
This sorrowless one climbs up the terrace of wisdom,
And surveys the ignorant sorrowing folk
As one standing on a mountain, the groundlings.
28. As a dweller in the mountains looks down on those who live in the valley, so the spiritually mature person, the hero free from sorrow, having driven out unmindfulness by means of mindfulness, ascends to the Palace of Wisdom and looks down at the sorrowful, spiritually immature multitude (below). 28. When the wise one puts off sloth for zeal, ascending the high tower of wisdom he gazes sorrowless upon the sorrowing crowd below ! Wise himself, he looks upon the fools as one upon a mountain-peak gazing upon the dwellers in the valley. When one who’s wise does drive away
heedlessness by heedfulness,
having ascended wisdom’s tower
steadfast, one surveys the fools,
griefless, views the grieving folk,
as mountaineer does those below.
8. When a wise man discards negligence by vigilance, ascends to the palace of wisdom and gazes upon the sorrowing people, he is free from suffering, even as a wise man on a mountain peak views many unwise people on the plain. (28)
9 29. Heedful among the heedless, wide-awake among the sleepy, the wise man advances like a swift horse leaving behind a weak jade. 29. Diligent among those who are negligent, awake among those who slumber, the wise advance like a racehorse, leaving others behind. 29. Strenuous amid the heedless, 'mid the sleepers wide awake,
As a racer beats the weak jade, so the wise outstrips the fools.
29. Vigilant among the heedless, wakeful among the sleeping ones, the wise man forges ahead, as a swift steed outstrips a horse of lesser strength. Careful amidst the careless, amongst the sleeping wide-awake, the intelligent man leaves them all behind, like a race-horse does a mere hack. 29 29. Earnest among the thoughtless, awake among the sleepers, the wise man advances like a racer, leaving behind the hack. (29) Conscientious amongst the negligent, watchful amongst the sleeping,
the wise one advances like a swift horse, having left behind a weak one.
Heedful among the heedless,
Wide awake among those asleep,
The wise man advances
As a swift horse leaving a weak nag behind.
29. Mindful among the unmindful, wide awake among the sleeping, the man of good understanding forges ahead like a swift horse outdistancing a feeble hack. 29. Zealous amidst the slothful, vigilant among the sleepers, go the prudent, as a racehorse out- strips a hack. Among the heedless, heedful,
among the sleepy, wide awake.
As the swift horse outruns a hack
so one of good wisdom wins.
9. Vigilant amongst the negligent, awake amongst those sleeping, the wise man like a swift horse runs his race, outrunning the slow ones behind. (29)
#heedfulness 10 30. By Heedfulness did Indra become the overlord of the gods. Heedfulness is ever praised, and heedlessness ever despised. 30. It was through earnest effort that Magha became Sakka, lord of the gods. The diligent are always respected, the negligent never. 30. Maghavā by Heedfulness attained the kingship of the gods;
Heedfulness is praised for ever; Heedlessness is ever blamed.
30. Through vigilance, did Maghavan (Indra) attain to the sovereignty of the gods. Vigilance is ever praised and negligence is ever loathed by the sages. It was by attention that Indra attained the highest place among the gods. People approve of attention, while carelessness is always condemned. 30 30. By earnestness did Maghavan (Indra) rise to the lordship of the gods. People praise earnestness; thoughtlessness is always blamed. (30) By conscientiousness did Indra become the chief amongst the gods.
Conscientiousness is praised, negligence is always censured.
By vigilance it was that
Indra attained the lordship of the gods.
Earnestness is ever praised,
Carelessness is ever despised.
30. By means of mindfulness, Maghava (i.e., Indra) attained to the chieftaincy of the gods. Mindfulness is always praised, unmindfulness always despised. 30. By zeal did Sakra reach supremacy among the gods. Men praise zeal ; but sloth is always blamed. Heedfulness is always praised,
heedlessness is ever blamed.
By heedfulness did Magha go
to lordship of the gods.
10. Maghava (or Indra) became the chief of the gods by vigilance. Vigilance is ever praised; negligence is ever despised. (30)
#heedfulness, #monk 11 31. The monk who delights in heedfulness and looks with fear at heedlessness advances like fire, burning all fetters, small and large. 31. A Bhikkhu who takes delight in vigilance and who sees danger in negligence advances like a fire, burning all fetters, great and small. 31. Monks whom Heedfulness delighteth, seeing fear in Heedlessness,
As the fire blazeth onwards, burn their fetters great and small.
31. The bhikkhu (monk) who delights in vigilance, who regards negligence with abhorrence, advances, consuming all subtle and gross fetters, like the fire. A bhikkhu taking pleasure in being attentive, and recognising the danger of carelessness, makes progress like a forest fire, consuming all obstacles large or small in his way. 31 31. A Bhikshu (mendicant) who delights in earnestness, who looks with fear on thoughtlessness, moves about like fire, burning all his fetters, small or large. (31) The monk, who is devoted to conscientiousness and who is fearful of negligence,
advances like a fire, burning the fetters, small or big.
The bhikkhu who delights in earnestness
And discerns dangers in negligence,
Advances, consuming all fetters,
Like fire burning fuel, both small and great.
31. The almsman (bhikkhu) who delights in mindfulness (and) who regards unmindfulness with fear advances like fire, burning up fetters gross and subtle. 31. A Bhikkhu who delights in zeal, looking askance at sloth, moves onwards like a fire, burning the greater and the lesser bonds. The bhikkhu liking heedfulness,
seeing fear in heedlessness,
advances as a conflagration
burning fetters great and small.
11. The Bhikshu who delights in vigilance and looks with fear on negligence goes on his path like fire, burning all obstacles both great and small. (31)
12 32. The monk who delights in heedfulness and looks with fear at heedlessness will not fall. He is close to Nibbana. 32. A Bhikkhu who takes delight in vigilance and who sees danger in negligence cannot fall away. He is, indeed, nearing nibbāna. 32. Monks whom Heedfulness delighteth, seeing fear in Heedlessness,
Cannot fall into destruction; they are near Nibbāna's shore.
32. The bhikkhu who delights in vigilance, who looks upon negligence with abhorrence, is not liable to fall back, because he is indeed close to nirvana. A bhikkhu taking pleasure in being attentive, and recognising the danger of carelessness, is incapable of falling away. In fact he is already close to Nirvana. 32 32. A Bhikshu (mendicant) who delights in reflection, who looks with fear on thoughtlessness, cannot fall away (from his perfect state)--he is close upon Nirvana. (32) The monk, who is devoted to conscientiousness and who is fearful of negligence,
unable to regress, he is just in the vicinity of the Nirvana.
The bhikkhu who delights in earnestness,
And discerns dangers in negligence,
Is not liable to fall away;
He is certainly in the present of Nibbana.
32. The almsman who delights in mindfulness (and) who regards unmindfulness with fear is not liable to regression. He is in the presence of Nirvana. 32. A Bhikkhu who delights in zeal, looking askance at sloth, cannot be brought low, but is near to Nirvana. The bhikkhu liking heedfulness,
seeing fear in heedlessness,
never will he fall away,
near is he to Nibbana.
12. The Bhikshu who delights in vigilance and looks with fear on negligence, is not liable to fall away. He is in the presence of Nirvana. (32)
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
III Citta
vagga
The Mind The Mind The Mind The Mind Thoughts Thought The Mind The Mind The Mind The Mind Mind Mind
#mind, #control, #fletcher, #wise 1 33. Just as a fletcher straightens an arrow shaft, even so the discerning man straightens his mind -- so fickle and unsteady, so difficult to guard. 33. The mind is excitable and unsteady; it is difficult to control and difficult to restrain. As an archer aims an arrow, the wise straighten their restless thoughts. 33. The fugitive, flickering mind,
Hard to guard and hard to bind,
The wise men train as they choose,
As a fletcher fashions a shaft to his use.
33. The discerning man straightens his mind, which is fickle and unsteady, difficult to guard and restrain, as the skilled fletcher straightens the shaft (of the arrow). Elusive and unreliable as it is, the wise man straightens out his restless, agitated mind, like a fletcher crafting an arrow. 33 33. As a fletcher makes straight his arrow, a wise man makes straight his trembling and unsteady thought, which is difficult to guard, difficult to hold back. (33) The wavering, unsteady mind, hard to guard, difficult to restrain,
the wise one straightens, like an arrow-maker an arrow.
The flickering, fickle mind,
Difficult to guard, difficult to control,
The wise man straightens,
As a fletcher, an arrow.
33. As a fletcher straightens the arrow, so the man of understanding makes straight the trembling unsteady mind, which is difficult to guard (and) difficult to restrain. 33. THIS trembling, wavering mind, so difficult to guard and to control this the wise man makes straight as the fletcher straightens his shaft. Mind agitated, wavering,
hard to guard and hard to check,
one of wisdom renders straight
as arrow-maker a shaft.
1. The mind is flickering and restless, difficult to guard, difficult to control. The wise person straightens his mind as a fletcher straightens an arrow. (33)
#fish, #Māra, #mind 2 34. As a fish when pulled out of water and cast on land throbs and quivers, even so is this mind agitated. Hence should one abandon the realm of Mara. 34. As a fish thrashes about in agony when it is taken out of the water and thrown onto dry ground, the mind taken out of the world of sense pleasures to escape the grip of Māra trembles all over. 34. Like a fish flung out on the bank;
Drawn from its watery home in a tank,
Flutters this fugitive mind
To leave the realm of Māra behind.
34. As the fish, taken out of its watery home and thrown on land, thrashes around, so does the mind tremble, while freeing itself from the dominion of Mara (the Evil One). Trying to break out of the Tempter's control, one's mind writhes to and fro, like a fish pulled from its watery home onto dry ground. 34 34. As a fish taken from his watery home and thrown on dry ground, our thought trembles all over in order to escape the dominion of Mara (the tempter). (34) Like a fish, thrown from all abodes on a dry ground
this mind trembles in order to leave Mara's realm.
Like a fish drawn from its watery abode
And thrown upon land,
Even so does the mind flutter.
Hence should the realm of Mara be shunned.
34. As a fish threshes from side to side when taken from one abode to another and cast on dry land, so the mind throbs and vibrates (with the strain) as it abandons the domain of Mara. 34. As quivers the fish when thrown upon the ground, far from his home in the waters, so the mind quivers as it leaves the realm of Death. As fish from watery home
is drawn and cast upon the land,
even so flounders this mind
while Mara’s Realm abandoning.
2. Like a fish that is drawn from water and thrown on dry land, the mind strives and struggles to escape from the realm of passions. (34)
#mind, #control, #happiness 3 35. Wonderful, indeed, it is to subdue the mind, so difficult to subdue, ever swift, and seizing whatever it desires. A tamed mind brings happiness. 35. The mind is difficult to train — it goes where it likes and does what it wants. It is good to tame the mind, for a well-trained mind brings happiness. 35. Impalpable, hard to seize,
Eagerly rushing wherever it please,
Good is the taming of mind;
A mind well-tamed is a treasure to find.
35. The mind is unstable and flighty. It wanders wherever it desires. Therefore it is good to control the mind. A disciplined mind brings happiness. It is good to restrain one's mind, uncontrollable, fast moving, and following its own desires as it is. A disciplined mind leads to happiness. 35 35. It is good to tame the mind, which is difficult to hold in and flighty, rushing wherever it listeth; a tamed mind brings happiness. (35) Good is the taming of the mind, which is difficult to restrain, quick,
jumping at whatever it desires. Restrained mind brings happiness.
Good is it to control the mind
Which is hard to check and swift
And flits wherever it desires.
A subdued mind is conducive to happiness.
35. (The mind) is frivolous and difficult to control, alighting on whatever it pleases. It is good to tame the mind. A tamed mind brings happiness. 35. Good it is to tame the mind, so difficult to control, fickle, and capricious. Blessed is the tamed mind. The mind is very hard to check
and swift, it falls on what it wants.
The training of the mind is good,
a mind so tamed brings happiness.
3. The mind is hard to check, swifting and alighting wherever it likes. It is good to master this mind. A disciplined mind is conducive to happiness. (35)
#mind, #wise, #control, #happiness 4 36. Let the discerning man guard the mind, so difficult to detect and extremely subtle, seizing whatever it desires. A guarded mind brings happiness. 36. The mind is very difficult to perceive — it is both delicate and extremely subtle. It goes where it wants and settles where it wants. The wise should guard their minds, for a guarded mind brings happiness. 36. Invisible, subtle indeed,
Eagerly rushing its passions to feed,
Let the wise man guard this mind;
A guarded mind is a treasure to find.
36. The mind is incomprehensible and exceedingly subtle. It wanders wherever it desires. Therefore, let the wise aspirant watch over the mind. A well-guarded mind brings happiness. A wise man should guard his mind for it is very hard to keep track of, extremely subtle, and follows its own desires. A guarded mind brings happiness. 36 36. Let the wise man guard his thoughts, for they are difficult to perceive, very artful, and they rush wherever they list: thoughts well guarded bring happiness. (36) O Wise Ones, you should protect the mind, which is very difficult to see, very subtle
and jumping at whatever it desires. Protected mind brings happiness.
Hard to perceive and extremely subtle is the mind,
It roams wherever it desires.
Let the wise man guard it;
A guarded mind is conducive to happiness.
36. The mind is extremely subtle and difficult to grasp, alighting on whatever it pleases. Let the man of understanding keep watch over the mind. A guarded mind brings happiness. 36. Let the wise man guard his mind, in- comprehensible, subtle, and capricious though it is. Blessed is the guarded mind. The mind is very hard to see
and find, it falls on what it wants.
One who’s wise should guard the mind,
a guarded mind brings happiness.
4. The mind is very hard to perceive, extremely subtle, alighting wherever it likes. A wise man guards his mind. A guarded mind is conducive to happiness. (36)
#mind, #control, #Māra 5 37. Dwelling in the cave (of the heart), the mind, without form, wanders far and alone. Those who subdue this mind are liberated from the bonds of Mara. 37. The mind wanders far and moves about alone; it is formless; it lies in the cave. Those who control their mind will be free from the bonds of Māra. 37. Wandering, dwelling apart,
Bodiless there in the cave of the heart,
They who subdue this mind
Leave all the fetters of Māra behind.
37. Those who control the mind which wanders afar, solitary, incorporeal, and which resides in the inner cavern (of the heart), will liberate themselves from the shackles of Mara. The mind goes wandering off far and wide alone. Incorporeal, it dwells in the cavern of the heart. Those who keep it under control escape from Mara's bonds. 37 37. Those who bridle their mind which travels far, moves about alone, is without a body, and hides in the chamber (of the heart), will be free from the bonds of Mara (the tempter). (37) Those, who can restrain the mind, which is going far, wandering alone, bodiless
and living in the cave, those will be freed from the bond of Mara.
Faring afar, solitary, bodiless,
Lying in a cave, is the mind.
Those who subdue it are freed
From the bond of Mara.
37. Far-ranging and lone-faring is the mind, incorporeal and abiding in the cave (of the heart). Those who bring it under control are freed from the bonds of Mara. 37. They will escape the fetters of Death who control that far-wandering, solitary, in- corporeal cave-dweller, the mind. Drifting far, straying all alone,
formless, recumbent in a cave.
They will be free from Mara’s bonds
who restrain this mind.
5. The mind travels afar, wanders alone, is incorporeal, lies in a cave. Those who subdue it are liberated from the bond of Mara. (37)
#wisdom, #Dhamma, #ignorance, #confidence 6 38. Wisdom never becomes perfect in one whose mind is not steadfast, who knows not the Good Teaching and whose faith wavers. 38. For those whose minds are unsteady, who are ignorant of the Dhamma, and whose faith is wavering, their wisdom will never grow. 38. If he know not the Doctrine Pure,
If he waver in faith and be not sure,
If his mind be not strong-willed,
The cup of his wisdom is never fulfilled.
38. He whose mind is not steady, who is ignorant of the true Dhamma, whose tranquillity is ruffled, the wisdom of such a man does not come to fullness. If he is unsettled in mind, does not know the true Teaching, and has lost his peace of mind, a man's wisdom does not come to fulfilment. 38 38. If a man's thoughts are unsteady, if he does not know the true law, if his peace of mind is troubled, his knowledge will never be perfect. (38) The wisdom of a person, whose mind is unsteady, who does not understand
the True Dharma and whose confidence is wavering will not become perfect.
He whose mind is inconstant,
He who knows not the true doctrine,
He whose confidence wavers -
The wisdom of such a one is never fulfilled.
38. His wisdom does not attain to perfection whose mind is unsettled, who is ignorant of the Real Truth (saddhamma), and whose faith wavers. 38. In him who is unstable and ignorant of the law and capricious in his faith, wisdom is not perfected. One of unsteady mind,
who doesn’t know True Dhamma,
who is of wavering confidence
wisdom fails to win.
6. He whose mind is unsteady, who knows not the true doctrine, whose faith wavers — the wisdom of such a person will never be perfect. (38)
#fearlessness 7 39. There is no fear for an awakened one, whose mind is not sodden (by lust) nor afflicted (by hate), and who has gone beyond both merit and demerit. 39. They are wise whose thoughts are steady and minds serene, whose minds are not affected by lust and hatred, and who have abandoned both good and evil. They are awake and free from fear. 39. If his mind be free from desire,
If his thought be free from anger's fire,
If evil and good he forsake,
There is no fear in the man that's awake.
39. Fear has he none, whose mind is not defiled by passion, whose heart is devoid of hatred, who has surpassed (the dichotomy of) good and evil and who is vigilant. With his mind free from the inflow of thoughts and from restlessness, by abandoning both good and evil, an alert man knows no fear. 39 39. If a man's thoughts are not dissipated, if his mind is not perplexed, if he has ceased to think of good or evil, then there is no fear for him while he is watchful. (39) There is no fear for a person, whose mind is free of passions and not perplexed,
who has abandoned the idea of "good" and "bad" and who is watchful.
He who is vigilant,
He whose mind is not overcome by lust and hatred,
He who has discarded both good and evil
For such a one there is no fear.
39. There is no fear for someone who is awake, whose mind is uncontaminated by craving, (and) unperplexed, (and) who has given up vice and virtue. 39. There is no fear in him, the vigilant one whose mind is not befouled with lust, nor embittered with rage, who cares nought for merit or demerit. One of unflooded mind,
a mind that is not battered,
abandoning evil, merit too,
no fear for One Awake.
7. He whose mind is free from the lust of desires, which is not influenced by hatred, who has transcended both good and evil — for such an awakened person has no fear. (39)
#wisdom, #Māra, #detachment, #body, #mind 8 40. Realizing that this body is as fragile as a clay pot, and fortifying this mind like a well-fortified city, fight out Mara with the sword of wisdom. Then, guarding the conquest, remain unattached. 40. Remember that this body is like a fragile clay pot. Make your mind a fortress and conquer Māra with the weapon of wisdom. Even after defeating Māra, one should still continue to guard one’s mind and feel no attachment to what has been gained. 40. "Body's a vessel of clay;
Mind must be made like a fort," if he say,
Let him give battle to Mara, arrayed
In the weapons of wisdom, unafraid
Let him conquer and guard him and passionless stay.
40. Knowing the corporeal body to be fragile, as an earthen jar, and fortifying the mind like a citadel, let the wise man fight Mara with the sword of wisdom. He should now protect what he has won, without attachment. Seeing your body as no better than an earthen pot, make war on Mara with the sword of wisdom, and setting up your mind as a fortress, defend what you have won, remaining free from attachment. 40 40. Knowing that this body is (fragile) like a jar, and making this thought firm like a fortress, one should attack Mara (the tempter) with the weapon of knowledge, one should watch him when conquered, and should never rest. (40) Having understood this body to be like a jar,
having established this mind like a city,
attack Mara with the weapon of wisdom,
you should protect the conquered territory and be without attachments.
Realizing that this body is fragile as a pot
And establishing hi mind as firm as a fortified city,
He should attack Mara with the weapon of wisdom.
He should guard his conquest
And afford no rest to Mara.
40. Perceiving the body to be (fragile) like a clay pot, (and) fortifying the mind as though it were a city, with the sword of wisdom make war on Mara. Free from attachment, keep watch over what has been won. 40. Let him who knows that his body is brittle as a potsherd, make his mind strong as a fortress ; let him smite Mara with the sword of wisdom, and let him guard his conquest without dalliance. Having known this urn-like body,
made firm this mind as fortress town,
with wisdom-weapon one fights Mara
while guarding booty, unattached.
8. Realizing that this body is as fragile as a jar, and establishing this mind as firm as a fortress, he should attack Mara with the weapon of wisdom. He should guard his conquests, without attachment to it. (40)
#body, #death 9 41. Ere long, alas! this body will lie upon the earth, unheeded and lifeless, like a useless log. 41. Remember that this body will soon lie in the earth without life, without value, useless as a rotten log. 41. Soon, ah! soon on the earth
Will this body lie, a thing of no worth,
Neglected, void of the six
Workings of sense, a mere bundle of sticks.
41. Alas! ere long, this corporeal body will lie flat upon the earth, unheeded, devoid of consciousness, like a useless log of wood. Before long this body will be lying on the ground, discarded and unconscious, like a useless bit of wood. 41 41. Before long, alas! this body will lie on the earth, despised, without understanding, like a useless log. (41) Alas! Before long will this body lay upon the ground,
rejected, devoid of consciousness, like a worthless log.
Soon alas will this body lie
Upon the ground, unheeded,
Devoid of consciousness,
Even as a useless log.
41. Before long, this body, devoid of consciousness, will lie rejected on the ground like a useless faggot. 41. Soon will this body lie upon the ground, deserted, and bereft of sense, like a log cast aside. Not long alas, and it will lie
this body, here upon the earth.
Discarded, void of consciousness,
useless as a rotten log.
9. For before long, how sad! This body will lie upon the ground, cast aside, devoid of consciousness, like a useless charred log. (41)
#harm, #enemy, #mind 10 42. Whatever harm an enemy may do to an enemy, or a hater to a hater, an ill-directed mind inflicts on oneself a greater harm. 42. More than those who hate you, more than all your enemies, an undisciplined mind does greater harm. 42. Whatever the ill that a foe
Doth a foe, whatever the grudge he may owe.
Greater by far will he find
The ill that is done by an ill-trained mind.
42. An ill-directed mind does greater harm to the self than a hater does to another hater or an enemy to another enemy. One's own misdirected thought can do one more harm than an enemy or an ill-wisher. 42 42. Whatever a hater may do to a hater, or an enemy to an enemy, a wrongly-directed mind will do us greater mischief. (42) Whatever an enemy might do to an enemy, or a hater to a hated one, wrongly directed mind can do one even worse (evil). Whatever harm a foe may do to a foe,
Or a hater to a hater,
An ill-directed mind
Can harm one even more.
42. Whatever foe may do to foe, or hater to hater, greater is the harm done (to oneself) by a wrongly directed mind. 42. Badly does an enemy treat his enemy, a foeman his foe : worse is the havoc wrought by a misdirected mind. Whatever foe may do to foe,
or haters those they hate
the ill-directed mind indeed
can do one greater harm.
10. Whatever an enemy may harm an enemy, and whatever a hateful man may harm another hateful one, but a man’s own mind, if wrongly directed, can do him far greater harm. (42)
#benefit, #mind, #relative 11 43. Neither mother, father, nor any other relative can do one greater good than one's own well-directed mind. 43. More than your mother, more than your father, more than all your family, a well-disciplined mind does greater good. 43. Nay, not a father or mother
Could do so much; not a kinsman or other;
Greater by far will he find
The good that is done by a well-trained mind.
43. Neither father nor mother, nor any other kindred, can confer greater benefit than does the well-directed mind. Even your mother, father or any other relative cannot do you as much good as your own properly directed thought. 43 43. Not a mother, not a father will do so much, nor any other relative; a well-directed mind will do us greater service. (43) What a mother, father or even other relatives can not do,
a well directed mind can do even far better than that.
What neither mother, nor father,
Nor any other relative can do,
A well-directed mind does
And thereby elevates one.
43. Neither mother nor father, nor any other relative, can do one as much good as a perfectly directed mind. 43. Not mother and father, not kith and kin can so benefit a man as a mind attentive to the right. What one’s mother, what one’s father,
whatever other kin may do,
the well directed mind indeed
can do greater good.
11. A mother or father, or any other relative can indeed do good to a man, but a man’s own mind, if correctly directed, can do him far greater good. (43)
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
IV Puppha
vagga
Flowers Flowers Flowers The Flowers Flowers Flowers The Flower The Flowers Flowers Flowers Flowers Flowers
# 1 44. Who shall overcome this earth, this realm of Yama and this sphere of men and gods? Who shall bring to perfection the well-taught path of wisdom as an expert garland-maker would his floral design? 44. Who will conquer this earth,44 this realm of Yama, and this world, along with the world of the gods? As a garland-maker chooses the right flowers, choose the well- taught Path of the Dhamma, and go beyond the realms of death and of the gods. 44. Who shall discern this earth aright
And the Realm of Death and the World of Light?
Who shall choose out the Way
Of righteousness well displayed,
As a skilled hand chooseth a flower gay?
44. Who shall gain victory over this earth together with the domain of Yama (ruler of the Underworld) with its gods? Who shall find the well-proclaimed Dhammapada (path of truth), even as the expert gardener selects the choicest flower? Who will master this world and the world of Death with its devas? Who will gather well taught aphorisms (dhammapadas), like an connoisseur picking a flower? 44 44. Who shall overcome this earth, and the world of Yama (the lord of the departed), and the world of the gods? Who shall find out the plainly shown path of virtue, as a clever man finds out the (right) flower? (44) Who will investigate this earth and this Yama's world with its deities?
Who will understand this well taught Dharma-verse, as a skilful person picks flowers?
Who will conquer this earth (life)
With Yama's realm and with celestial world?
Who will investigate the well-taught Dhamma-verses
Even as a skilful garland-maker plucks flowers?
44. Who shall conquer the earth and the Realm of Death with its deities? Who shall make out the well-taught Verses of Truth as an expert picks flowers? 44. WHO shall conquer this world, and the realm of Death with its attendant gods ? Who shall sort the verses of the well-preached Law, as a clever weaver of garlands sorts flowers ? Who will comprehend this earth,
the world of Yama, and the gods?
Who will discern the well-taught Dhamma
as one who’s skilled selects a flower.
1. Who will conquer this earth and this realm of Yama, and this world together with devas? Who will gather well-expressed words of truth in the Path of Virtue, even as an expert (garland-maker) gathers flowers? (44)
# 2 45. A striver-on-the path shall overcome this earth, this realm of Yama and this sphere of men and gods. The striver-on-the-path shall bring to perfection the well-taught path of wisdom, as an expert garland-maker would his floral design. 45. A disciple in training will conquer this earth, this realm of Yama, and this world, along with the world of the gods. As a garland-maker chooses the right flowers, such a disciple will choose the well-taught Path of the Dhamma and go beyond the realms of death and of the gods. 45. The disciple discerneth this earth aright
And the Realm of Death and the World of Light;
The disciple chooseth the Way
Of Righteousness well displayed,
As a skilled hand chooseth a flower gay.
45. The disciple will gain victory over the earth and the realm of Yama together with its gods. The true disciple will indeed find the well-proclaimed Dhammapada, even as the expert gardener selects the choicest flower. A disciple will master this world and the world of Death with its devas. A disciple will gather well taught aphorisms (dhammapadas), like a connoisseur picking a flower. 45 45. The disciple will overcome the earth, and the world of Yama, and the world of the gods. The disciple will find out the plainly shown path of virtue, as a clever man finds out the (right) flower. (45) A disciple will investigate the earth and this Yama's world with its deities.
A disciple will understand this well taught Dharma-verse, as a skilful person picks flowers.
A learner (sekha) will conquer this earth
With Yama's realm and with celestial world.
He will investigate the well-taught Dhamma Verses.
Even as a skilful garland-maker plucks flowers.
45. The Learner (of the Transcendental Path) shall conquer the Realm of Death with its deities. The Learner shall make out the well-taught Verses of Truth as an expert picks flowers. 45. My disciple shall conquer this world and Death with its attendant gods : it is he who shall sort the verses of the well-preached Law as a clever garland-maker sorts flowers. One Trained will comprehend this earth,
the world of Yama, and the gods,
One Trained discern the well-taught Dhamma
as one who’s skilled selects a flower.
2. A trainee disciple will conquer this earth and this realm of Yama, and this world together with devas. A trainee disciple will gather well-expressed words of truth in the Path of Virtue, even as an expert (garland-maker) gathers flowers. (45)
# 3 46. Realizing that this body is like froth, penetrating its mirage-like nature, and plucking out Mara's flower-tipped arrows of sensuality, go beyond sight of the King of Death! 46. One who remembers that this body is as impermanent as froth, as insubstantial as a mirage, will break the flower-tipped arrows of Māra51 and pass beyond the sight of the King of Death. 46. Seeing this body as like unto foam,
Illusive, by insight of wisdom alone,
Scattering Death's flower-tipp'd shafts,
He shall pass to a realm where Death is unknown.
46. Recognizing this corporeal body to be evanescent as foam, comprehending this worldly nature as a mirage, and having broken the flower-arrows of Cupid (Mara), the true aspirant will go beyond the realm of the Evil One. Seeing the foam-like nature of the body, and awakening to its mirage-like quality, one can escape the sight of the King of Death, snapping Mara's flowery bonds. 46 46. He who knows that this body is like froth, and has learnt that it is as unsubstantial as a mirage, will break the flower-pointed arrow of Mara, and never see the king of death. (46) Having understood that this body is like foam, having realized its mirage-like nature,
having cut off Mara's flower-tipped arrows, one should make himself invisible to the King of Death.
Perceiving this body to be similar unto foam
And comprehending its mirage-nature,
One should destroy the flower-tipped arrows of Love
And pass beyond the sight of the King of Death.
46. Seeing the body as froth, (and) thoroughly comprehending its mirage- nature, let one proceed unseen by the King of Death, having broken the flower- tipped arrows of Mara. 46. Let him escape the eye of Mara, regarding his body as froth, knowing it as a mirage, plucking out the flowery shafts of Mara. Having known this froth-like body
and awakening to its mirage nature,
smashing Mara’s flowered shafts
unseen beyond the Death-king go.
3. Knowing that this body is like foam, and realizing its mirage-nature, one should destroy the sharp arrows of Mara, concealed in the flowers of sensuous passions, and pass beyond the sight of the King of Death. (46)
# 4 47. As a mighty flood sweeps away the sleeping village, so death carries away the person of distracted mind who only plucks the flowers (of pleasure). 47. Like those who spend their lives gathering flowers, those whose minds are attached to sense pleasures are swept away by death, just as a flood sweeps away a sleeping village. 47. Culling life's blossoms here and there,
With his mind entangled by pleasures' delay,
Death comes and carries him off,
As a flood sweeps a slumbering village away.
47. The hedonist who seeks only the blossoms of sensual delights, who indulges only in such pleasures, him the Evil One carries off, as a flood carries off the inhabitants of a sleeping village. Death carries off a man busy picking flowers with an besotted mind, like a great flood does a sleeping village. 47 47. Death carries off a man who is gathering flowers and whose mind is distracted, as a flood carries off a sleeping village. (47) The man who is only gathering flowers, with an attached mind,
the death will carry away, like a great flood the sleeping village.
The man who gathers flowers of sensual pleasures,
Whose mind is distracted -
Death carries him off
As the great flood, a sleeping villager.
47. As a great flood carries away a sleeping village, so death bears off the man who, possessed of longing, plucks only the flowers (of existence). 47. He who is busy culling pleasures, as one plucks flowers, Death seizes and hurries off, as a great flood bears away a sleeping village. For one who has a clinging mind
and gathers only pleasure-flowers,
Death does seize and carry away
as great flood a sleeping village.
4. Death carries away the man who gathers flowers (of sensual pleasure), and whose mind is distracted, as a great flood sweeps away a sleeping village. (47)
# 5 48. The Destroyer brings under his sway the person of distracted mind who, insatiate in sense desires, only plucks the flowers (of pleasure). 48. Like those who spend their lives gathering flowers, those whose minds are attached to sense pleasures, whose desires are insatiable, are swept away by death. 48. Culling life's blossoms here and there,
With his mind entangled by pleasures' delay,
Insatiate in desire,
Death makes him his bondsman and takes him away.
48. The hedonist who seeks only the blossoms of sensual delights, whose mind is agitated, him the Evil One (Mara) brings under his sway even before his carnal desires are satiated. Death, the end-maker, will exercise his will on a man busy picking flowers with a besotted mind, before he has even found satisfaction. 48 48. Death subdues a man who is gathering flowers, and whose mind is distracted, before he is satiated in his pleasures. (48) The man who is only gathering flowers, with an attached mind,
unsatisfied in sense pleasures, Death gets under control.
The man who gathers flowers of sensual pleasures,
Whose mind is distracted
And who is insatiate in desires -
Him the Destroyer brings under his way.
48. The Destroyer brings under his sway the man who, possessed by longing, plucks only the flowers (of existence), (and) who is insatiable in sexual passions. 48. The Destroyer treads him underfoot as he is culling worldly pleasures, still unsated with lusts of the flesh. For one of desires insatiate
who gathers only pleasure-flowers,
for one who has a clinging mind
Death the sovereign overpowers.
5. And death, the end of all, overpowers the man who gathers flowers (of sensual pleasure), whose mind is distracted, and who is thirty for desires. (48)
# 6 49. As a bee gathers honey from the flower without injuring its color or fragrance, even so the sage goes on his alms-round in the village. 49. As a bee drinks nectar and then flies away without harming the flower, so should a Bhikkhu wander through a village. 49. As a bee on the wing flits from flower to flower,
Not harming the scent or the blossom's hue,
And is gone taking only the taste,
Let the sage his way through the village pursue.
49. As the bee takes away the nectar, and departs from the flower without harming its color or fragrance, so let a sage move about in the village. A holy man should behave in the village like a bee which takes its food from a flower without hurting its appearance or its scent. 49 49. As the bee collects nectar and departs without injuring the flower, or its colour or scent, so let a sage dwell in his village. (49) Just like a bee leaves the flower, not hurting the color and smell,
having taken its juice, so should a wise man walk through the village.
As the bee takes honey from the flowers,
Leaving its colour and fragrance unharmed,
So should the sage wander in the village.
49. Let the silent sage move about in the village as the bee goes taking honey from the flower without harming colour or fragrance. 49. As a bee taking honey from flowers, without hurt to bloom or scent, so let the sage seek his food from house to house. Just as a bee in a flower
harming neither hue nor scent
gathers nectar, flies away,
so in towns a Wise One fares.
6. As a bee without damaging the flower, its color or scent, flies away and collecting only the honey, even so the sage wanders in the village. (49)
# 7 50. Let none find fault with others; let none see the omissions and commissions of others. But let one see one's own acts, done and undone. 50. Do not give your attention to what others do or fail to do, whether they are doing what is right or what is wrong. Rather, give your attention to what you do or fail to do, whether you are doing what is right or what is wrong. 50. Not with other men's faults and other men's failings,
Nor the things they have done, nor the things left undone,
Should the wise man be concerned;
Let him look to his own things done and undone.
50. Let the aspirant observe not the perversities of others, nor what others have and have not done; rather should he consider what he has done and what he has yet to do. It is no the shortcomings of others, nor what others have done or not done that one should think about, but what one has done or not done oneself. 50 50. Not the perversities of others, not their sins of commission or omission, but his own misdeeds and negligences should a sage take notice of. (50) One should not look at others' wrong deeds, what the others have done or not.
One should look only at what one oneself has and has not done.
Pay no attention to the faults of others,
Things done or left undone by others.
Consider only what by oneself
Is done or left undone.
50. One should pay no heed to the faults of others, what they have done and not done. Rather should one consider the things that one has oneself done and not done. 50. Be not concerned with other men's evil words or deeds or neglect of good : look rather to thine own sins and negligence [lit. " sins of commission and omission " : things done and undone]. Not others’ opposition
nor what they did or failed to do,
but in oneself should be sought
things done, things left undone.
7. Do not seek others’ faults, or what others have done or not done, think what you yourself have done and have not done. (50)
# 8 51. Like a beautiful flower full of color but without fragrance, even so, fruitless are the fair words of one who does not practice them. 51. Just as a lovely flower, full of color but lacking in fragrance, cannot give anyone the benefit of its scent, the well-spoken words of the Buddha are of no benefit to those who do not put the Dhamma into practice. 51. Fair is the flow'r with its hue and its colour;
But if it lack odour its beauty is hollow.
So fair are the words well-spoken,
But how empty the words which deeds do not follow.
51. Like unto a lovely flower which is exquisite in color, yet lacking in fragrance, even so prove futile the well-spoken words of the man who acts not up to them. Like a fine flower, beautiful to look at but without scent, fine words are fruitless in a man who does not act in accordance with them. 51 51. Like a beautiful flower, full of colour, but without scent, are the fine but fruitless words of him who does not act accordingly. (51) Just like a beautiful flower, colorful but without smell,
is a well said speech of somebody, who does not act accordingly.
As a flower that is lovely
And colourful, but scentless,
Even so fruitless is the well-spoken word
Of one who follows it not.
51. Like a beautiful flower, brightly coloured but without scent, even so useless is the well-uttered speech of one who does not act accordingly. 51. As some bright flower fair to look at, but lacking fragrance so are fair words which bear no fruit in action. Just as a gorgeous blossom
brilliant but unscented,
so fruitless the well-spoken words
of one who does not act.
8. Like a flower that is lovely and beautiful, but has no scent, even well spoken word hear no fruit is one who does not practice it. (51)
# 9 52. Like a beautiful flower full of color and also fragrant, even so, fruitful are the fair words of one who practices them. 52. Just as a lovely flower, full of both color and fragrance, will give the benefit of its scent to all, the well-spoken words of the Buddha will benefit those who put the Dhamma into practice. 52. Fair is the flow'r with its hue and its colour;
But if it have odour its beauty's not hollow;
So fair are the words well-spoken;
Well-spoken indeed are the words which deeds follow.
52. Like unto a lovely flower of charming color and sweet fragrance, even so prove fruitful the words of him who acts according to them. Like a fine flower, beautiful to look at and scented too, fine words bear fruit in a man who acts well in accordance with them. 52 52. But, like a beautiful flower, full of colour and full of scent, are the fine and fruitful words of him who acts accordingly. (52) Just like a beautiful flower, colorful and with smell,
is a well said speech of somebody, who does act accordingly.
As a flower that is lovely,
Colourful, and fragrant
Even so fruitful is the well-spoken word
Of one who practises it.
52. Like a beautiful flower, brightly coloured and scented, even so useful is the well-uttered speech of one who acts accordingly. 52. As some bright flower, fragrant as it is fair, so are fair words whose fruit is seen in action. Just as a gorgeous blossom
brilliant and sweet-scented,
so fruitful the well-spoken words
of one who acts as well.
9. Like a flower that is lovely and beautiful and also has scent, even so well-spoken words bear fruit in one who practices it. (52)
# 10 53. As from a great heap of flowers many garlands can be made, even so should many good deeds be done by one born a mortal. 53. Just as many garlands can be made from a heap of flowers, many good deeds can be done in this life (through the sharing of one’s wealth with others). 53. As one from a heap of gathered flowers
Makes many a garland, many a crown;
So by a mortal being
Many a seed of good may be sown.
53. As many a garland can be strung from a mass of flowers, so should mortal man born in this world perform many wholesome deeds. Just as one can make a lot of garlands from a heap of flowers, so man, subject to birth and death as he is, should make himself a lot of good karma. 53 53. As many kinds of wreaths can be made from a heap of flowers, so many good things may be achieved by a mortal when once he is born. (53) Just as from the heap of flowers one can do a lot of garlands,
so a born mortal should do a lot of meritorious deeds.
As from a heap of flowers
Many kinds of garlands can be made,
So many good deeds should be done
By one born a mortal.
53. As many garlands are made from a heap of flowers, so one who is a mortal born should perform many ethically skilful deeds. 53. As if from a pile of flowers one were to weave many a garland, so let mortals string together much merit. As from a mass of flowers
many a garland may be made,
so by one born mortal
should many good deeds be done.
10. As from a heap of flowers, many garlands and wreaths can be made; many good deeds can be done by a mortal being. (53)
# 11 54. Not the sweet smell of flowers, not even the fragrance of sandal, tagara, or jasmine blows against the wind. But the fragrance of the virtuous blows against the wind. Truly the virtuous man pervades all directions with the fragrance of his virtue. 54. The scent of flowers cannot travel against the wind, nor can the scent of sandalwood or rhododendron or jasmine; but the fragrance of those who do good spreads everywhere. 54. The odour of flowers cannot prevail
'Gainst the wind, nor of sandal and tagara fair;
'Gainst the wind goes the odour of saints;
The odour of saints goeth everywhere.
54. The fragrance of flowers does not travel against the wind, be it that of sandalwood, tagara, or jasmine. But the fragrance of the virtuous man travels even against the wind. The virtuous man pervades all directions with his purity. The scent of flowers cannot travel against the wind, and nor can that of sandalwood or jasmine, but the fragrance of the good does travel against the wind, and a good man perfumes the four quarters of the earth. 54 54. The scent of flowers does not travel against the wind, nor (that of) sandal-wood, or of Tagara and Mallika flowers; but the odour of good people travels even against the wind; a good man pervades every place. (54) The scent of flowers, sandal, tagara or jasmine does not go against the wind.
The scent of true ones goes against the wind. The true person pervades all directions.
The perfume of flower blows not against the wind,
Nor does the fragrance of sandal-wood, tagara and jasmine,
But the fragrance of the virtuous blows against the wind.
The virtuous man pervades all directions.
54. The fragrance of flowers, of sandalwood, of aromatic resin or jasmine, does not go against the wind, (whereas) the fragrance of the good does go against the wind. 54. No scent of flower is borne against the wind, though it were sandal, or incense or jasmine : but the fragrance of the holy is borne against the wind : the righteous pervade all space [with their fragrance]. The fragrance of flowers drifts with the wind
as sandalwood, jasmine of lavender.
The fragrance of virtue o’ersweeps the wind,
all pervasive is virtue of the good.
11. The scent of flowers does not go against the wind; not sandalwood, not tagara, not jasmine. But the scent of the virtuous does go against the wind; the scent of virtues perfumes all directions. (54)
# 12 55. Of all the fragrances -- sandal, tagara, blue lotus and jasmine -- the fragrance of virtue is the sweetest. 55. Neither the scent of sandalwood nor rhododendron, neither the scent of lotus nor jasmine, can come near the fragrance of those who do good. 55. Sweet is the sandal and sweet is the tagara,
And sweet of the lily the odour faint;
But of all sweet-savoured things
Sweetest by far is the scent of the saint.
55. Among all the fragrant scents, like sandalwood, tagara, the water lily and the wild jasmine, the fragrance of moral purity is foremost and unique. Sandalwood, tagara, lotus, jasmine -- the fragrance of virtue is unrivalled by such kinds of perfume. 55 55. Sandal-wood or Tagara, a lotus-flower, or a Vassiki, among these sorts of perfumes, the perfume of virtue is unsurpassed. (55) Sandal or tagara, lotus and jasmine,
of these kinds of scent, the scent of the virtue is highest.
Sandal-wood, tagara, lotus and wild jasmine - Of all these kinds of fragrance, The fragrance of virtue is by far the best. 55. Sandalwood or aromatic resin, blue lotus, or wild jasmine, of all these kinds of fragrance, the odour of virtue is unsurpassed. 55. More excellent than the scent of sandal and incense, of lily and jasmine, is the fragrance of good deeds. Sandalwood or lavender,
lotus or the jasmine great,
of these many fragrances
virtue’s fragrance is supreme.
12. Sandalwood, tagara, lotus, jasmine — even among all these kinds of fragrance, the perfume of virtue is by far the best. (55)
# 13 56. Faint is the fragrance of tagara and sandal, but excellent is the fragrance of the virtuous, wafting even amongst the gods. 56. Faint is the scent of sandalwood and rhododendron, but the fragrance of those who do good rises high, even to the abode of the gods. 56. How small a thing is the odour of wood
Of the sandal or jasmine! How poor is their scent!
Yet the odour of saints prevails
E'en 'mongst the gods, most excellent.
56. That scent of sandalwood, tagara plant (and other fragrant things) is of little account; whereas the aroma of the virtuous expands in a greater sphere, even up to the gods. The perfume of tagara and sandalwood is of little enough power, while the supreme fragrance, that of the virtuous, reaches even up to the devas. 56 56. Mean is the scent that comes from Tagara and sandal-wood;--the perfume of those who possess virtue rises up to the gods as the highest. (56) Very faint is this scent of tagara and sandal.
Highest is the scent of a virtuous one; it blows even amongst the gods.
Little is the fragrance of tagara
And sandal-wood,
But the fragrance of virtue is excellent
And blows even among the devas.
56. Insignificant in comparison is this fragrance of aromatic resin and sandalwood. The fragrance of virtue it is that blows among the gods as the highest. 56. A slight thing is this scent of incense and of sandal- wood, but the scent of the holy pervades the highest heaven. Faint is this fragrance
of lavender and sandalwood,
but fragrance of the virtuous
soars sublime amongst the gods.
13. The fragrance of tagara or sandal is but slight; the fragrance of virtuous people is supreme, which blows even amongst the gods. (56)
# 14 57. Mara never finds the path of the truly virtuous, who abide in heedfulness and are freed by perfect knowledge. 57. Māra cannot find the path taken by those who are endowed with virtue, who live mindfully, and who have been freed from moral defilements by Right Knowledge. 57. Men who live righteously, men who live heedfully,
Perfect in wisdom, rebirth have transcended:
Though he search for the prints of their feet,
Death cannot find them: their journey is ended.
57. Mara (the Evil One) cannot approach the path of the virtuous, the vigilant, and those who are emancipated through wisdom. Perfect of virtue, always acting with recollection, and liberated by final realisation -- Mara does not know the path such people travel. 57 57. Of the people who possess these virtues, who live without thoughtlessness, and who are emancipated through true knowledge, Mara, the tempter, never finds the way. (57) Mara doesn't find the way of those endowed with virtue,
living in conscientiousness and freed by the right knowledge.
Of those who possess these virtues,
Who live without negligence,
Who are freed by perfect knowledge,
Mara finds not their way.
57. Mara does not find the path of those who are virtuous, who live mindfully, and who are freed through Perfect Knowledge (sammadanna). 57. Death finds not the path of the righteous and strenuous, who are set free by their perfect wisdom. Of those with perfect virtue
who dwell in heedfulness,
freed by Final Knowledge:
Mara cannot know their path.
14. There is no way for Mara to find the path of those who are virtuous, vigilant in living, and are liberated by right knowledge. (57)
# 15 58. Upon a heap of rubbish in the road-side ditch blooms a lotus, fragrant and pleasing. 58–59. A true follower of the Buddha shines among blind mortals, as the fragrant lotus, growing in the garbage by the roadside, brings joy to all who pass by. 58-9. On a heap of dung by the high road hurled,
As a lily may bloom and grow,
Delighting the mind with its fragrance pure:
So, lit by the wisdom of those who know,
'mid those who on the dung-hill grow
A disciple shines out in the darkened world.
58, 59. As upon a heap of rubbish, thrown on the highway, a lily grows and blooms, fragrant and elegant, so among the ignorant multitudes does the disciple of the Fully Enlightened One shine in resplendent wisdom. Like a beautiful, fragrant lotus, springing up on a pile of rubbish thrown out on the highway, so a disciple of the Enlightened One stands out among rubbish-like and blinded ordinary people by virtue of his wisdom. 58, 59 58, 59. As on a heap of rubbish cast upon the highway the lily will grow full of sweet perfume and delight, thus the disciple of the truly enlightened Buddha shines forth by his knowledge among those who are like rubbish, among the people that walk in darkness. (58) Just as at the rubbish heap, thrown out by the big road,
can grow a lotus, of pure smell and delightful,
Just as on a heap of rubbish
Thrown upon the highway
Grows the lotus sweetly fragrant
And delighting the heart.
58. As pink lotuses, sweet-scented and lovely, spring from a heap of rubbish thrown in the highway, 58. 59. As on some roadside dung-heap, a flower blooms fragrant and delightful, so amongst the refuse of blinded mortals shines forth in wisdom the'follower of the true Buddha. As beside the highroad
where rubbish in a pit is flung
there flourishes the lotus bloom
fragrant and the mind’s delight.
15-16. Just as a fragrant, lovely lotus grows from a heap of rubbish thrown on the road, so does a disciple of the Fully Enlightened One shine pure light of wisdom in the midst of blind mortal. (58-59)
# 16 59. Even so, on the rubbish heap of blinded mortals the disciple of the Supremely Enlightened One shines resplendent in wisdom. (59) Thus, amidst the dust-like beings, amongst ignorant ordinary people, The disciple of the truly and completely Awakened One magnificently shines with wisdom. Even so among those blinded mortals
Who are like rubbish,
The disciple of the Fully-Enlightened One
Shines with exceeding glory by his wisdom.
59. so among those who have become (as) rubbish, (among) ignorant, ordinary people, the Disciple of the Perfectly Enlightened One shines forth exceedingly in wisdom. So among rubbish-beings,
common humans blind-become,
the Perfect Buddha’s pupil
outshines with wisdom bright.
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
V Bala
vagga
The Fool The Immature Fools The Fool The Fool The Fool The Fool The Fool The Spiritually Immature The Fool Fools Fools
# 1 60. Long is the night to the sleepless; long is the league to the weary. Long is worldly existence to fools who know not the Sublime Truth. 60. Long is the night to those who cannot sleep; long is the road to the weary. Long is the cycle of birth and death to those who do not know the Dhamma. 60. Long is the night to him that is waking,
Long is a league to the traveller worn,
Long is the coil of births
For fools that know not the truth of the Norm.
60. Long is the night to a sleepless person; long is the distance of a league to a tired person; long is the circle of rebirths to a fool who does not know the true Law. Long is the night for the sleepless. Long is the road for the weary. Long is samsara (the cycle of continued rebirth) for the foolish, who have not recognised the true teaching. 60 60. Long is the night to him who is awake; long is a mile to him who is tired; long is life to the foolish who do not know the true law. (60) Long is the night for a wakeful; long is a yojana for a tired.
Long is the Samsara for the fools who do not know the true Dharma.
Long is the night to the wakeful,
Long is the yojana to one who is weary,
Long is Sa�sara to the foolish
Who know not the true doctrine.
60. Long is the night to the wakeful, long the league to one who is exhausted (with travel). Long is the process of faring (through repeated existences) to those spiritually immature ones who do not know the real truth (saddhamma). 60. LONG is the night to the watcher, long is the league to the weary traveller : long is the chain of existence to fools who ignore the true Law. Long is the night for the sleepless,
long is the league for the weary one,
samsara’s way is long for fools
who know not the Dhamma True.
1. The night is long for the wakeful, the road is long for the weary, Samsara is long for the foolish who do not know the Sublime Truth. (60)
# 2 61. Should a seeker not find a companion who is better or equal, let him resolutely pursue a solitary course; there is no fellowship with the fool. 61. If, as you travel through life, you do not find another whose understanding of the Dhamma is either equal to or greater than your own, walk on alone. One cannot advance by associating with those lacking wisdom. 61. If one find not a comrade to join him in travel.
Either like unto self or better than self,
It is safer to push on alone;
What fellowship can there be with a fool?
61. If a genuine seeker, who sets forth in search of a superior friend, does not come in contact with such a one or at least an equal, then he should resolutely choose the solitary course, for there can be no companionship with the ignorant. If on one's way one does not come across one's better or an equal, then one should press on resolutely alone. There is no companionship with a fool. 61 61. If a traveller does not meet with one who is his better, or his equal, let him firmly keep to his solitary journey; there is no companionship with a fool. (61) If a wanderer should not find a companion better or similar to oneself,
then he should resolutely wander alone. There is no companionship with a fool.
If, as he fares, he finds no companion
Who is better or equal,
Let him firmly pursue his solitary career;
There is no fellowship with the fool.
61. If he who goes about (in search of truth) does not find one better than or (at least) similar to himself, let him firmly lead a solitary life. There is no companionship (for him) with the spiritually immature. 61. If on a journey thou canst not find thy peer or one better than thyself, make the. journey stoutly alone : there is no company with a fool. If a wayfarer fails to find
one better or equal,
steadfast he should fare alone
for a fools no fellowship.
2. The disciple who travels along cannot find a companion better or equal, let him firmly pursue his solitary career. There is no companionship with the foolish. (61)
# 3 62. The fool worries, thinking, "I have sons, I have wealth." Indeed, when he himself is not his own, whence are sons, whence is wealth? 62. The immature think, “These children are mine; this wealth is mine.” They cannot even call themselves their own, much less their children or wealth. 62. "I am father of sons! I am owner of wealth!"
Thinks the fool in his folly and thereat is troubled.
He himself is not owner of self;
Much less is he owner of sons and of wealth.
62. "I have children, I have wealth," thinking thus, the fool torments himself. But, when he is not the possessor of his own self, how then of children? How then of wealth? "I've got children", "I've got wealth." This is the way a fool brings suffering on himself. He does not even own himself, so how can he have children or wealth? 62 62. "These sons belong to me, and this wealth belongs to me," with such thoughts a fool is tormented. He himself does not belong to himself; how much less sons and wealth? (62) The fool worries: "I have sons, I have wealth."
He does not even own himself. Whence sons and wealth?
I have sons, I have wealth;'
So thinks the fool and is troubled.
He himself is not his own,
How then are sons, how wealth?
62. The spiritually immature person vexes himself (thinking) ‘Sons are mine, riches are mine’. He himself is not his own, even; how then sons? how then riches? 62. " I have sons and wealth," thinks the fool with anxious care ; he is not even master of himself, much less of sons and wealth. "Sons have I, wealth have I",
thus the fool is fretful.
He himself is not his own,
how then are sons, how wealth?
3. "I have sons, I have wealth" — the fool troubles himself. Even one’s self is not one’s own, how then sons, how then wealth? (62)
# 4 63. A fool who knows his foolishness is wise at least to that extent, but a fool who thinks himself wise is a fool indeed. 63. The immature who know they are immature have a little wisdom. But the immature who look on themselves as wise are utterly foolish. 63. Wise indeed is he that knoweth his folly;
Fool indeed is the fool that thinks himself wise.
63. The fool who knows of his ignorance, indeed, through that very consideration becomes a wise man. But that conceited fool who considers himself learned is, in fact, called a fool. A fool who recognises his own ignorance is thereby in fact a wise man, but a fool who considers himself wise -- that is what one really calls a fool. 63 63. The fool who knows his foolishness, is wise at least so far. But a fool who thinks himself wise, he is called a fool indeed. (63) A fool who knows about his foolishness, just by that he is like a wise man.
And a fool, who is proud of his cleverness, he is indeed called a fool.
The fool aware of his stupidity
Is in so far wise,
But the fool thinking himself wise
Is called a fool indeed.
63. The spiritually immature person who recognizes his immaturity is to that extent mature; the spiritually immature one who thinks of himself as mature is termed immature indeed. 63. The fool who knows his folly is so far wise : but the fool who reckons himself wise is called a fool indeed. Conceiving so his foolishness
the fool is thereby wise,
while ‘fool’ is called that fool
conceited that he’s wise.
4. The fool who knows that he is a fool is for that very reason a wise man; the fool who thinks that he is wise is called a fool indeed. (63)
# 5 64. Though all his life a fool associates with a wise man, he no more comprehends the Truth than a spoon tastes the flavor of the soup. 64. Those who are immature cannot understand the Dhamma even if they spend their whole life with the wise. How can the spoon know the taste of soup? 64. Tho' a fool in his folly sit all his life long
By the side of a wise man, he never gets wiser,
For he knows not the Norm and its worth,
As the spoon never knoweth the taste of the broth.
64. A fool who associates with a wise man throughout his life may not know the Dhamma any more than the ladle the taste of soup. Even if a fool lived with a wise man all his life, he would still not recognise the truth, like a wooden spoon cannot recognise the flavour of the soup. 64 64. If a fool be associated with a wise man even all his life, he will perceive the truth as little as a spoon perceives the taste of soup. (64) A fool can attend on a wise man even for whole his life,
he will not understand the Dharma, like a spoon does not know the taste of the soup.
Though through all his life
A fool associates with a wise man,
He yet understands not the Dhamma,
As the spoon, the flavour of soup.
64. Though throughout his life a spiritually immature person attends upon (or: honours) one who is spiritually mature, he does not necessarily know the truth, any more than the spoon knows the taste of the soup. 64. Though for a lifetime the fool keeps company with the wise, yet does he not learn righteousness, as spoon gets no taste of soup. Though all through life the fool
might wait upon the wise,
no more Dhamma can he sense
than spoon the taste of soup.
5. Though a fool lives with a wise man through all his life, he never understands the Dharma, just as a spoon never knows the taste of soup. (64)
# 6 65. Though only for a moment a discerning person associates with a wise man, quickly he comprehends the Truth, just as the tongue tastes the flavor of the soup. 65. If the mature spend even a short time with the wise, they will understand the Dhamma, just as the tongue knows the taste of soup. 65. But a wise man that sits by the wise but a minute,
Quickly learns of the Norm and its worth,
As the tongue quickly savours the taste of the broth.
65. As the tongue detects the taste of the broth, so the intelligent person who associates with a wise man even for a moment comes to realize the essence of the Law. Even if a man of intelligence lives with a wise man only for a moment, he will immediately recognise the truth, like one's tongue recognises the flavour of the soup. 65 65. If an intelligent man be associated for one minute only with a wise man, he will soon perceive the truth, as the tongue perceives the taste of soup. (65) An intelligent person can attend on a wise man even for a second,
he will quickly understand the Dharma, like a tongue knows the taste of the soup.
Though, for a moment only,
An intelligent man associates with a wise man
Quickly he understands the Dhamma,
As the tongue, the flavour of soup.
65. If for a moment a wise man attends upon one who is spiritually mature, he quickly perceives the truth, as the tongue at once detects the taste of the soup. 65. If but for a moment the thoughtful keep company with the wise, straightway he learns righteousness, as tongue tastes soup. Though briefly one intelligent
might wait upon the wise,
quickly Dhamma he can sense
as tongue the taste of soup.
6. Though an intelligent person lives with a wise man for only a moment, he quickly understands the Dharma, just as a tongue knows the taste of soup. (65)
# 7 66. Fools of little wit are enemies unto themselves as they move about doing evil deeds, the fruits of which are bitter. 66. The immature are their own enemies, doing selfish deeds which will bring them sorrow. 66. Fools fare up and down with themselves for their foe,
And work evil deeds whose fruit will be bitter;
66. The unwise, fools who are enemies to themselves, go about committing sinful deeds which produce bitter fruits. Stupid fools go through life as their own enemies, doing evil deeds which have bitter consequences. 66 66. Fools of little understanding have themselves for their greatest enemies, for they do evil deeds which must bear bitter fruits. (66) The stupid fools behave as if they themselves were their enemies,
doing bad deeds, which have bitter fruit.
Fool of little wit
Behave to themselves as enemies,
Doing evil deeds
The fruits whereof are bitter.
66. Of evil understanding, the spiritually immature live as enemies to themselves, committing sinful deeds, the consequences of which are bitter. 66. Fools and dolts go their way, their own worst enemies : working evil which bears bitter fruit. Fools of feeble wisdom fare
enemies to themselves,
making evil kamma
which is of bitter fruit.
7. A fool who thinks he is wise acts as the enemy to himself, doing evil deeds that in the end bear bitter fruits. (66)
# 8 67. Ill done is that action of doing which one repents later, and the fruit of which one, weeping, reaps with tears. 67. That deed is poorly done if one feels remorse for having done it and if it brings suffering in its wake. 67. Ill-done is the deed that brings sorrow in doing,
Whose fruit they will meet with tears and annoy;
67. Not well done is that deed which one, having performed, has to repent; whose consequence one has to face with tears and lamentation. A deed is not well done if one suffers after doing it, if one bears the consequences sobbing and with tears streaming down one's face. 67 67. That deed is not well done of which a man must repent, and the reward of which he receives crying and with a tearful face. (67) That deed is not well done, which one regrets when it is accomplished,
whose consequences one faces with a tearful face and crying.
That deed is not well-done,
After doing which one feels remorse
And the fruit whereof is received
With tears and lamentations.
67. That deed is not well done which, being done, one repents, (and) the result of which one suffers with tearful face and lamentations. 67. That is no good deed which brings remorse, whose reward one receives with tears and lamentation. That kamma’s not well-made
from which there is remorse,
of which one senses the result
with weeping and a tear-stained face.
8. That deed is not well done when being done, one repents. Weeping with tears, one reaps the bitter fruits of the wrong deed thereof. (67)
# 9 68. Well done is that action of doing which one repents not later, and the fruit of which one, reaps with delight and happiness. 68. But good is that deed which brings no remorse, only happiness, in its wake. 68. Well done is the deed that brings pleasure in doing,
Whose fruit they will welcome with gladness and joy.
68. Well done is that deed which one, having performed, does not repent, and whose consequence one experiences with delight and contentment. But a deed is well done if one does not suffer after doing it, if one experiences the consequences smiling and contented. 68 68. No, that deed is well done of which a man does not repent, and the reward of which he receives gladly and cheerfully. (68) That deed is well done, which one does not regret when it is accomplished,
whose consequences one faces delighted and happy.
Well-done is that deed
Which, done, brings no regret;
The fruit whereof is received
With delight and satisfaction.
68. That deed is well done which, being done, one does not repent, (and) the result of which one receives gladly. 68. But that is the good deed which brings no remorse, whose reward the doer takes with joy and gladness. But well-made is that kamma
which done brings no remorse,
of which one senses the result
with glad mind and with joy.
9. But that deed is indeed well done when being done, one has not to repent. Rejoicing with pleasure, one reaps the sweet fruits of the right deed thereof. (68)
# 10 69. So long as an evil deed has not ripened, the fool thinks it as sweet as honey. But when the evil deed ripens, the fool comes to grief. 69. As long as the evil deed does not bear fruit, the immature think it is sweet like honey. But when the evil deed ripens, they suffer. 69. "O! how sweet!" thinks the fool, ere his wicked deed ripens.
When his wicked deed ripens he knows what is sorrow.
69. So long as an evil deed does not mature (bring disastrous results), the fool thinks his deed to be sweet as honey. But, when his evil deed matures, he falls into untold misery. A fool thinks it like honey so long as the bad deed does not bear fruit, but when it does bear fruit he experiences suffering. 69 69. As long as the evil deed done does not bear fruit, the fool thinks it is like honey; but when it ripens, then the fool suffers grief. (69) The fool thinks it is as honey, as long as the evil is not ripe.
When the evil is ripe, then he undergoes suffering.
As sweet as honey the fool thinks an evil deed
So long as it does not bear fruit;
But when it ripens,
The fool comes to grief.
69. So long as it has not ripened, the spiritually immature one thinks sin as sweet as honey; (but) when sin does ripen, then the spiritually immature one suffers a downfall. 69. Honey-sweet to the fool is his sin until it ripens : then he comes to grief. When evil kamma’s immature
the fool thinks it is honeyed,
but when the evil has matured
then to the fool comes dukkha.
10. As long as it has not borne fruit, the fool thinks the fruit is as sweet as honey, but when the bitter fruit of evil deed ripens, then he comes to grief. (69)
# 11 70. Month after month a fool may eat his food with the tip of a blade of grass, but he still is not worth a sixteenth part of the those who have comprehended the Truth. 70. Even if the immature fast month after month, taking food sparingly with only the tip of a blade of grass, they are not worth a sixteenth part of those who truly understand the Dhamma. 70. Tho' month after month with the blade of a sword-grass
The fool eats his rice grain by grain,
Not one fourth of a quarter of good doth he gain
Such as those who are stablished in Dhamma obtain.
70. Though a fool (practicing austerity) may eat his food from the tip of a blade of kusa grass for months and months, he is not worth one-sixteenth part of those who have realized the Good Law. Even if a fool were to take his food month after month off the tip of a blade of grass, he would still not be worth a fraction of those who have understood the truth. 70 70. Let a fool month after month eat his food (like an ascetic) with the tip of a blade of Kusa grass, yet he is not worth the sixteenth particle of those who have well weighed the law. (70) Month by month can a fool eat his food with a blade of the kusa grass,
he is not worth a sixteenth part of those, who have realized the Dharma.
Month after month the fool may eat his food
With the tip of kusa grass;
Nonetheless he is not worth the sixteenth part
Of those who have well understood the Dhamma.
70. Month after month, a spiritually immature person may eat his food with the tip of a blade of (sacred) kusa-grass, (yet) his worth is not a fraction (lit., not a sixteenth part) of those who have ascertained the truth. 70. If once a month the fool sips his food from a blade of the sacred grass his is no fraction of the Arahat's worth. Month after month with blady-grass tip
the fool may take his food;
he’s not worth the slightest bit
of one who Dhamma knows.
11. Month after month a fool may fast by eating only as much food as can be picked up on the tip of a Kusa grass blade, yet his worth is not a sixteenth part of that of the wise man who have comprehended the Truth. (70)
# 12 71. Truly, an evil deed committed does not immediately bear fruit, like milk that does not turn sour all at once. But smoldering, it follows the fool like fire covered by ashes. 71. As fresh milk needs time to curdle, an evil deed needs time to bear its fruit. It follows the immature, eventually burning them, like fire smoldering under the ashes. 71. Now an ill deed, like milk, doth not change into curds,
But it burneth the fool—a live coal 'neath the ashes.
71. As fresh-drawn milk from the cow does not soon curdle, so an evil deed does not produce immediate fruits. It follows the wrongdoer like a smoldering spark that burns throughout and then suddenly blazes up. Like fresh milk a bad deed does not turn at once. It follows a fool scorching him like a smouldering fire. 71 71. An evil deed, like newly-drawn milk, does not turn (suddenly); smouldering, like fire covered by ashes, it follows the fool. (71) An evil deed when done, doesn't instantly bear fruits; just like milk
does not coagulate at once. Burning, it follows the fool like fire covered with ashes.
An evil deed committed
Does not immediately bear fruit,
Just as milk curdles not at once;
Smouldering like fire covered by ashes, It follows the fool.
71. Unlike milk, which flows7 immediately (the teat is sucked), the sin that has been committed does not at once bear fruit. (Instead) it pursues the spiritually immature person like a fire covered with ashes, burning him (only after a time). 71. Evil does not straightway curdle like milk, but is rather like a smouldering fire which attends the fool and burns him. As milk, is evil kamma done,
so slowly does it sour.
Smouldering does it follow the fool
like fire with ashes covered.
12. The effect of an evil deed does not come immediately, just as fresh milk does not turn sour at once. It follows the fool, like fire covered by ashes. (71)
# 13 72. To his own ruin the fool gains knowledge, for it cleaves his head and destroys his innate goodness. 72. Even if they pick up a little knowledge, the immature misuse it and break their heads instead of benefiting from it. 72. Since his knowledge is born to a fool all in vain,
His good luck is lost to him wholly;
On his own head it falls; he is crushed by his folly.
72. Whatever knowledge a fool acquires causes him only harm. It cleaves his head and destroys his good nature (through conceit). A fool acquires knowledge only to his own disadvantage. It destroys what good he has, and turns his brains. 72 72. And when the evil deed, after it has become known, brings sorrow to the fool, then it destroys his bright lot, nay, it cleaves his head. (72) A fool gains knowledge altogether for his harm.
It kills his fortune; it destroys his head.
The fool gains knowledge
Only for his ruin;
It destroys his good actions
And cleaves his head.
72. The spiritually immature person wins (theoretical religious) knowledge only to his own disadvantage; it destroys his better nature while splitting his head. 72. When the fool's wisdom bears evil fruit it bursts asunder his happiness, and smashes his head. Truly to his detriment
skill is born to the fool;
ruined is his better nature
and scattered are his wits.
13. Whatever the fool gains, knowledge and fame will ruin himself. It destroys the fool’s virtue, going to his head. (72)
# 14 73. The fool seeks undeserved reputation, precedence among monks, authority over monasteries, and honor among householders. 73. The immature Bhikkhus desire praise for qualities they do not have, preeminence among fellow monks, authority in the monasteries, and veneration from those not related to them. 73-4. If a fool long for credit that is not his due,
Chief seats in the monks' hall, respect from the Order,
And worship from laymen desiring;
"Let the monks and the laymen my deeds hold in honour
And in all things obey me, whate'er I may will—"
If such be the thoughts of the fool,
His pride and his longing increase in him still.
3, 74. Unwise is the monk who desires undue adoration from others, lordship over other monks, authority among the monastic dwellings and homage even from outside groups. Moreover, he thinks, "May both laymen and monks highly esteem my action! May they be subject to me in all actions, great or small." Such is the grasping desire of a worldly monk whose haughtiness and conceit ever increase. One may desire a spurious respect and precedence among one's fellow monks, and the veneration of outsiders. "Both monks and laity should think it was my doing. They should accept my authority in all matters great or small." This is a fool's way of thinking. His self-seeking and conceit just increase. 73, 74 73. Let the fool wish for a false reputation, for precedence among the Bhikshus, for lordship in the convents, for worship among other people! (73) He might want undue respect, deference from monks,
supremacy over dwellings and devotion from other families.
A foolish monk desires undue reputation,
Precedence among monks,
Authority in the monasteries,
Honour among other families.
73. One who is spiritually immature desires a false reputation, honour among fellow almsmen, authority over monastic settlements, and respect from the families (living) round about. 73. 74. If one desire the praise of knaves, or leadership amongst the Bhikkhus, and lordship in the convents, and the reverence of the laity, thinking "Let layman and religious alike appre- ciate my deeds ; let them do my bidding and obey my prohibitions," if such be his fond imaginings, then will ambition and self-will wax great. For position a fool may wish:
among the bhikkhus precedence,
in monasteries authority,
from other families honours.
14. The fool will desire undeserved reputation, precedence among the monks, authority in monasteries, and honor amongst other groups. (73)
# 15 74. "Let both laymen and monks think that it was done by me. In every work, great and small, let them follow me" -- such is the ambition of the fool; thus his desire and pride increase. 74. “Listen, monks and householders, I can do this; I can do that. I am right, and you are wrong. Obey me.” Fools, thinking thus, only increase their desires and pride. 74. "May both the layman and he who has left the world think that this is done by me; may they be subject to me in everything which is to be done or is not to be done," thus is the mind of the fool, and his desire and pride increase. (74) "Let both householders and monks think that it was done by me,
let them be under my will, in whatever duties."
Such are fool's thoughts. His desire and pride grows.
Let both laymen and monks think,
By me only was this done;
In every work, great or small,
Let them refer to me.'
Such is the ambition of the fool;
His desire and pride increase.
74. ‘Let both those householders and those who have gone forth (from the household life) approve what I have done; let them be subject to me in all undertakings, great and small.’ Such is the wish of the spiritually immature, (as a result of which) his craving and conceit increase. Both monks and laymen, let them think
'This was done by me
whatever the works, both great and small,
let them depend on me'.
Such the intention of a fool,
swollen his greed and conceit.
15. Let both laymen and monks think, "This I have done, and let them refer me in every work, no matter great or small". Such are the ambition of the fool. This desire and pride increase. (74)
# 16 75. One is the quest for worldly gain, and quite another is the path to Nibbana. Clearly understanding this, let not the monk, the disciple of the Buddha, be carried away by worldly acclaim, but develop detachment instead. 75.One path leads to worldly gain and pleasure, another to nibbāna. Fully realizing this, do not, O disciples of the Buddha, take delight in worldly gain and honor, but devote yourselves instead to solitude, detachment, and the realization of nibbāna. 75. "Success here is one thing, Nibbāna another:"
When a monk, the Buddha's disciple, is sure
Of this truth, he delights not in honour, eschews
The ways of the world and lives a recluse.
75. One path leads to worldly gain and honor; quite another path leads to nirvana. Having realized this truth, let not the monk, the true follower of the Enlightened One, yearn for homage from others, but let him cultivate serenity of mind and dispassion. One way leads to acquisition, the other leads to nirvana. Realising this a monk, as a disciple of the Buddha, should take no pleasure in the respect of others, but should devote himself to solitude. 75 75. "One is the road that leads to wealth, another the road that leads to Nirvana;" if the Bhikshu, the disciple of Buddha, has learnt this, he will not yearn for honour, he will strive after separation from the world. (75) Something else are worldly gains, something else is the path leading to the Nirvana.
Thus let a monk, the Buddha's student, having fully understood this, not rejoice at worship, but let him devote himself to solitude.
One is the way to worldly gain;
To Nibbāna another leads.
Clearly realizing this,
The bhikkhu, disciple of the Buddha,
Should not delight in worldly favour,
But devote himself to solitude.
75. One thing is that which leads to (worldly) gain; quite another the way that leads to Nirvana. Thus comprehending, let the almsman, the disciple of the Buddha, take no delight in respectful greetings, but devote himself to solitude. 75. One is the road leading to gain, another is that leading to Nirvana : knowing this, let the Bhikkhu, the follower of Buddha, strive in solitude, not seeking the praise of men, One is the way to worldly gain,
another to Nibbana goes.
Clearly comprehending this
the bhikkhu, Buddha’s follower
should wallow not in proffered gifts,
surrendering instead to solitude.
16. Surely, the Bhikshus, the disciple of the Buddha, understands the path that leads to worldly wealth and another path that leads to Nirvana. They should not rejoice in worldly honor, but cultivate for detachment. (75)
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
VI Pandita
vagga
The Wise The Wise (Man) The Wise The Wise The Wise Man The Wise Man The Wise The Wise The Spiritually Mature The Wise Man The Wise The Wise
# 1 76. Should one find a man who points out faults and who reproves, let him follow such a wise and sagacious person as one would a guide to hidden treasure. It is always better, and never worse, to cultivate such an association. 76. If you find someone wise, who can steer you away from the wrong path, follow that person as you would one who can reveal hidden treasures. Only good can come from following such a person. 76. If thou see a man of wisdom,
Like a guide to treasure-trove,
Pointing out thy faults and failings,
Follow him; such company
Brings prosperity, not woe.
76. The disciple should associate with a wise friend, who detects and censures his faults, and who points out virtues as a guide tells of buried treasures. There is happiness, not woe, to him who associates with such an intelligent friend. Like one pointing out hidden treasure, if one finds a man of intelligence who can recognise one's faults and take one to task for them, one should cultivate the company of such a wise man. He who cultivates a man like that is the better for it, not worse. 76 76. If you see an intelligent man who tells you where true treasures are to be found, who shows what is to be avoided, and administers reproofs, follow that wise man; it will be better, not worse, for those who follow him. (76) Should one see an intelligent person, who speaks rebukingly,
who can see faults as if showing treasures, one should associate with such a wise one.
Associating with such people is better, not worse.
Should one see a wise man,
Who, like a revealer of treasures,
Points out faults and reproves,
Let one associate with such a one,
Well is it, not ill, to associate with such a one.
76. Should one see a man of understanding who, as if indicating a (buried) treasure, points out faults and administers reproof, let one associate with such a spiritually mature person. To associate with one like this is good, not evil. 76. Look upon him who shows you your faults as a revealer of treasure : seek his company who checks and chides you, the sage who is wise in reproof : it fares well and not ill with him who seeks such company. Should one a man of wisdom meet
who points out faults and gives reproof,
who lays a hidden treasure bare,
with such a sage should one consort.
Consorting so is one enriched
and never in decline.
1. If one looks upon a wise man who points out faults as a revealer of hidden treasures, one should associate with a wise man. (76)
# 2 77. Let him admonish, instruct and shield one from wrong; he, indeed, is dear to the good and detestable to the evil. 77. Those who are wise should admonish others; they should give advice to others; and they should prevent others from doing what is wrong. Ones such as these are held dear by the good; they are disliked only by the bad. 77. He who gives advice and teaching,
And restrains thy feet from wrong,
By the righteous is beloved,
But the wicked love him not.
77. The man who exhorts, instructs and dissuades his fellowmen from unworthy acts is dear to the virtuous and hated by the wicked. If a man disciplines, instructs and restrains them from what is not right, he will be dear to the good, and disliked by the bad. 77 77. Let him admonish, let him teach, let him forbid what is improper!- -he will be beloved of the good, by the bad he will be hated. (77) He should admonish, he should advice, and he should restrain one from evil.
He is indeed dear to the good ones and he is not agreeable to the bad ones.
Let him admonish, exhort,
And shield from wrong.
Truly, pleasing is he to the good,
Displeasing is he to the bad.
77. Let him instruct, let him advise, let him restrain (one) from uncivilized behaviour, (and the result will be that) he will be dear to the good and detestable to the bad. 77. Let a man admonish, and advise, and keep others from strife ! So will he be dear to the righteous, and hated by the unrighteous. Let him exhort, let him instruct,
and check one from abasement.
Dear indeed is he to the true,
not dear is he to the false.
2. Let the wise man advise, instruct and restrain one from evil. He will be truly pleased by those who are good, and displeased by those who are not. (77)
# 3 78. Do not associate with evil companions; do not seek the fellowship of the vile. Associate with the good friends; seek the fellowship of noble men. 78. Make friends with those who are good and worthy, not with those who are bad and low. 78. Have no fellowship with evil;
Make no friends among the vile;
Make the virtuous thy companions;
Follow thou the Perfect Men.
78. Do not keep company with evildoing friends nor with people who are base; associate with the good, associate with the best of men. Don't cultivate the company of bad companions. Don't cultivate depraved men. Cultivate companions of good character. Cultivate superior men. 78 78. Do not have evil-doers for friends, do not have low people for friends: have virtuous people for friends, have for friends the best of men. (78) One should not associate with evil friends; one should not associate with vile people.
Associate with virtuous friends; associate with noble people.
Associate not with evil friends;
Associate not with mean men;
Associate with good friend;
Associate with noble men.
78. Do not associate with evil friends; do not associate with low fellows. Associate with spiritual friends; associate with superior men (purisuttamas). 78. Avoid bad friends, avoid the company of the evil : seek after noble friends and men of lofty character. Don’t go around with evil friends,
with rogues do not resort.
Spend your time with noble friends,
and worthy ones consort.
3. Do not associate with evil friends, and do not associate with mean men. Do associate with good friends and do associate with noblemen. (78)
# 4 79. He who drinks deep the Dhamma lives happily with a tranquil mind. The wise man ever delights in the Dhamma made known by the Noble One (the Buddha). 79. Those who imbibe the Dhamma live in joy with a serene mind. The wise take delight in the Dhamma expounded by the Noble Ones. 79. They who drink the Good Norm's nectar
Live in bliss with tranquil mind;
In the Norm by saints expounded
Wise men ever take delight.
79. One who drinks the nectar of the Good Law lives happily with a tranquil mind. The wise man ever delights in the Dhamma as realized by the Noble Ones. He who drinks in the Truth will live happily with a peaceful mind. A wise man always delights in the Truth taught by the saints. 79 79. He who drinks in the law lives happily with a serene mind: the sage rejoices always in the law, as preached by the elect (Ariyas). (79) One who finds joy in the Dharma dwells happily, with a bright mind.
The wise man always delights in the Dharma taught by the noble ones.
He who imbibes the Dhamma
Lives happily with the mind at rest.
The wise man ever delights
In the Dhamma revealed by the Noble.
79. One who has imbibed the Truth lives happily with well-seeing mind. The spiritually mature person delights in the Truth made known by the Noble (ariyas). 79. He who drinks in the law lives glad, for his mind is serene : in the law preached by the Noble the sage ever finds his joy. Happy is he who Dhamma drinks
with heart that’s clear and cool.
One so wise e’er delights
in Dhamma declared by the Noble.
4. He drinks of the Dharma and abides in happiness. The wise man ever delights in the Dharma revealed by the Ariyas. (79)
# 5 80. Irrigators regulate the rivers; fletchers straighten the arrow shaft; carpenters shape the wood; the wise control themselves. 80. As irrigators channel water where they want, as archers make their arrows straight, as carpenters fashion timber, the wise shape their minds. 80. Irrigators guide the waters,
Fletchers straighten out the shaft,
Carpenters unwarp the timber,
But the wise subdue themselves.
80. Irrigators conduct the water wherever they wish; fletchers shape the shafts; carpenters work the wood, and wise men discipline themselves. Navvies channel water, fletchers fashion arrows, and carpenters work on wood, but the wise disciple themselves. 80 80. Well-makers lead the water (wherever they like); fletchers bend the arrow; carpenters bend a log of wood; wise people fashion themselves. (80) Irrigators lead water. Arrow-makers bend arrow-shaft.
Carpenters bend wood. Wise ones master themselves.
Irrigators lead water;
Fletchers fashion shafts;
Carpenters bend wood;
The wise tame themselves.
80. Irrigators draw off waters; fletchers straighten arrows; carpenters shape wood; the spiritually mature discipline themselves. 80. Engineers control the water ; fletchers straighten the arrow ; carpenters fashion their wood. Sages control and fashion themselves. Irrigators govern waters,
fletchers fashion shafts,
as joiners shape their timber
those who are wise tame themselves.
5. Irrigators guide water in channelling, fletchers make the arrows straight in bending, carpenters control the timber in cutting. The wise control their own minds. (80)
# 6 81. Just as a solid rock is not shaken by the storm, even so the wise are not affected by praise or blame. 81. As a solid rock cannot be moved by the wind, the wise are not shaken by praise or blame. 81. As the solid rock for ever
Rests unshaken by the wind,
Wise men rest unwavering,
Troubled not by praise or blame.
81. As a solid rock is not shaken by the wind, so the wise are not shaken by censure or praise. Like a solid rock is not shaken by the wind, so the wise are not moved by praise or blame. 81 81. As a solid rock is not shaken by the wind, wise people falter not amidst blame and praise. (81) Just like a compact rock is not moved by the wind,
so the wise ones are not shaken by blame or praise.
Even as a solid rock
Is not shaken by the wind.
So do the wise remain unmoved
By praise or blame.
81. As a solid rock cannot be shaken by the wind, so the spiritually mature person is unmoved by praise or blame. 81. As some massive rock stands unmoved by the storm-wind, so the wise stand unmoved by praise or blame. Just as a mighty boulder
stirs not with the wind,
so the wise are never moved
either by praise or blame.
6. As a solid rock is not shaken by the wind, the wise are not moved by praise or blame. (81)
# 7 82. On hearing the Teachings, the wise become perfectly purified, like a lake deep, clear and still. 82. When the wise listen to the words of the Dhamma, their minds become calm and clear, like the waters of a still lake. 82. As a deep clear pool of water
Lies unruffled by the wind,
To the Good Norm listening
Wise men reach tranquillity.
82. The wise, having hearkened to the Good Law, become serene like unto a deep, calm and crystal-clear lake. The wise find peace on hearing the truth, like a deep, clear, undisturbed lake. 82 82. Wise people, after they have listened to the laws, become serene, like a deep, smooth, and still lake. (82) Just like a lake, deep, bright and clean,
so the wise ones become tranquil, after having heard the teachings.
Just as a lake, deep, clear, and still
Even so, on hearing the Dhamma,
The wise become exceedingly peaceful.
82. Hearing the Truth of Things, the spiritually mature win insight like a deep lake (suddenly) becoming clear and undisturbed. 82. As a deep lake, clear and undefiled, so are sages calmed by hearing the law. Even as a fathomless lake,
a lake so calm and clear,
so dhammas having heard
serene the wise become.
7. Just as a deep lake is clear and still, the wise become exceedingly peaceful when they hear the Dharma. (82)
# 8 83. The good renounce (attachment for) everything. The virtuous do not prattle with a yearning for pleasures. The wise show no elation or depression when touched by happiness or sorrow. 83. Those who are virtuous surrender all. They do not engage in idle chatter, nor do they hanker for sense pleasures. They are the same in good fortune and in bad. 83. When the good men go about,
Sensual babble is not theirs;
They, when touched by pain or pleasure,
Show a calm untroubled face.
83. Good men abandon lusting after things; they take no pleasure in sensual speech; when touched by happiness or sorrow, the wise show no elation or dejection. The good renounce everything. The pure don't babble about sensual desires. Whether touched by pleasure or pain, the wise show no change of temper. 83 83. Good people walk on whatever befall, the good do not prattle, longing for pleasure; whether touched by happiness or sorrow wise people never appear elated or depressed. (83) True people abandon everything. Good people do not mutter, desiring pleasure.
Wise people do not show elation or depression when they are affected by happiness or suffering.
The good renounce everything
And do not speak hankering after desires.
Touched by sorrow or happiness,
The wise become neither elated nor depressed.
83. True men give up everything; the righteous do not speak wishing for sensuous pleasures. Touched now by pleasure, now by pain, the spiritually mature show neither elation nor depression. 83. Freely go the righteous ; the holy ones do not whine and pine for lusts : unmoved by success or failure, the wise show no change of mood. Everything the good renounce,
the peaceful chatter not of fond delights,
and whether touched by pleasure or pain
nor joy or woe in the wise is seen.
8. The good give up attachment for everything. The sagely do not speak idle words on sensual craving. Whenever they are affected by happiness or by pain, the wise show neither elation nor depression. (83)
# 9 84. He is indeed virtuous, wise, and righteous who neither for his own sake nor for the sake of another (does any wrong), who does not crave for sons, wealth, or kingdom, and does not desire success by unjust means. 84. If one desires neither children nor wealth nor power nor success by unfair means, either for one’s own sake or for the sake of others, know such a one to be good, wise, and virtuous. 84. Not for self and not for others
Do they long for sons or wealth,
Not for rule, nor by injustice
Self-advancement to attain;
Righteous, wise and just are they.
84. For the sake of oneself, or for the sake of another, one should not long for a son, wealth or a kingdom. He who does not crave success or prosperity by wrongful means is indeed virtuous, wise and honorable. If a man does not seek children, wealth or power either for himself or for someone else, if he does not seek his own advantage by unprincipled means, he is a virtuous man, a wise man and a righteous man. 84 84. If, whether for his own sake, or for the sake of others, a man wishes neither for a son, nor for wealth, nor for lordship, and if he does not wish for his own success by unfair means, then he is good, wise, and virtuous. (84) One should not want a son, wealth or kingdom, not for one's own sake, not
for the sake of others,
one should not want one's own prosperity by injustice. Such a person is virtuous,
wise and righteous.
Neither for one's own nor another's sake
Should one commit any wrong,
Nor, by unjust means, should one desire
Sons, wealth, state or one's own success.
He should be virtuous, wise, and righteous.
84. Not for one’s own sake, nor for the sake of others, should one desire sons, wealth, or territory; one should not desire success for oneself by unrighteous means. He (who behaves in such a way) is virtuous, is wise, is righteous. 84. Desire not a son for thyself nor for another, nor riches nor a kingdom ; desire not thy gain by another's loss : so art thou righteous, wise, and good. Neither for one’s own, nor for another’s sake
one should wish for children, wealth, estate,
nor success desire by means unjust,
thus virtuous, and wise, righteous one would be.
9. Neither for the sake of oneself nor for the sake of another, he should not desire son, wealth, or kingdom by unrighteous means. By unrighteous means, he should not seek his own success. Then, such a person is indeed virtuous, wise and righteous. (84)
# 10 85. Few among men are those who cross to the farther shore. The rest, the bulk of men, only run up and down the hither bank. 85. Few are those who reach the other shore; most people keep running up and down this shore. 85. Few are they among us mortals
Who have reached the further shore
Over yonder. But we others
On this side fare up and down.
85 Few among men cross over to the further shore; the multitudes who remain run to and fro on this shore. Few are those among men who have crossed over to the other shore, while the rest of mankind runs along the bank. However those who follow the principles of the well-taught Truth will cross over to the other shore, out of the dominion of Death, hard though it is to escape. 85, 86 85. Few are there among men who arrive at the other shore (become Arhats); the other people here run up and down the shore. (85) Few are those amongst people, who have gone to the other shore.
And these other people just follow this shore.
Few are there among men
Who go to the further shore,
The rest of this mankind
Only run up and down the hither bank.
85. Few among men are those who go to the Further Shore. The other (ordinary) people chase up and down this shore. 85. Few amongst men are they who reach the farther shore : the rest, a great multitude, stand only on the bank. Among folk they are few
who go to the Further Shore,
most among humanity
scurry on this hither shore.
10. Few people amongst men can reach the Beyond (Nirvana); the rest of mankind only runs along the shore. (85)
# 11 86. But those who act according to the perfectly taught Dhamma will cross the realm of Death, so difficult to cross./td> 86. But those who follow the Dhamma, when it has been well taught, will reach the other shore, hard to reach, beyond the power of death. 86. They who hold fast to the teaching
Of the Norm expounded well
They shall reach the shore and pass
The realm of Death so hard to cross.
86. Those who live according to the Dhamma which has been well proclaimed (by the Buddha) will cross over the impassable realm of death to the further shore. 86. But those who, when the law has been well preached to them, follow the law, will pass across the dominion of death, however difficult to overcome. (86) And those who in the well-taught Dharma behave according to it,
those people will go beyond the realm of death, that is so difficult to cross.
Those who conform themselves to the Dhamma
That has been well-expounded -
Those are they who will reach the further shore,
Crossing the realm of death, so hard to cross.
86. Those people who conform themselves to the well-explained Truth of Things and who are desirous of (reaching) the Further Shore will pass over the Realm of Death, so difficult to transcend. 86. The righteous followers of the well-preached law, these are the mortals who reach the far shore. But hard is their journey through the realm of Death. But they who practise Dhamma
according to Dhamma well-told,
from Death’s Domain hard to leave
they’ll cross to the Further Shore.
11. For those who act properly according to the teaching, and explain correctly the truth, they will reach the Beyond (Nirvana) crossing the realm of passions, which is hard to cross over. (86)
# 12 87-88. Abandoning the dark way, let the wise man cultivate the bright path. Having gone from home to homelessness, let him yearn for that delight in detachment, so difficult to enjoy. Giving up sensual pleasures, with no attachment, let the wise man cleanse himself of defilements of the mind. 87–88. Those who are wise, leaving craving behind and having nibbāna as their goal, should abandon evil ways and cultivate pure, good ones. They should seek delight in solitude, detachment, and nibbāna, which an ordinary person finds so difficult to enjoy. They should also abandon sense pleasures and, clinging to nothing, should cleanse themselves of all impurities of the mind. 87-8. Giving up the state of darkness,
Let the wise embrace the pure;
Giving up home for the homeless
Loneliness, where joys are rare,
Let him long for bliss unbounded
Casting all desire aside,
Owning naught, and, firm in wisdom,
Cleanse his heart from passion's stain.
87. Having abandoned the ways of darkness, let the wise follow the light. Having come from home to homelessness, let him enjoy the bliss of solitude, so difficult to achieve. A wise man, abandoning the principle of darkness, should cultivate what is pure. Leaving home for the homeless life, let him seek his joy in the solitude which people find so hard to enjoy, and, abandoning sensual pleasures, let him cleanse himself of inner defilements, looking on nothing as his own. 87, 88 87, 88. A wise man should leave the dark state (of ordinary life), and follow the bright state (of the Bhikshu). After going from his home to a homeless state, he should in his retirement look for enjoyment where there seemed to be no enjoyment. Leaving all pleasures behind, and calling nothing his own, the wise man should purge himself from all the troubles of the mind. (87) Having abandoned the bad states let the wise man develop the good states.
having come from the house into houselessness, into solitude, which is not fit for pleasures.
Coming from home to the homeless,
The wise man should abandon dark state
And cultivate the bright.
He should seek great delight in solitude,
So hard to enjoy.
87. Forsaking dark ways, the spiritually mature person cultivates the bright. Coming from home to the homeless (life), he (abides) in solitude (which) is hard to enjoy. 87. 88. Leaving the way of darkness, let the sage cleave to the way of light : let him leave home for the homeless life, that solitude so hard to love [Nirvana]. Putting away lust and possessing nothing, let the sage cleanse himself from every evil thought. Abandoning the dhammas dark
the wise should cultivate the bright,
having from home to homeless gone
in solitude unsettling.
12-13. Leaving behind the path of darkness and cultivating the path of brightness, let the wise man leave his home life and go into a life without home. He should seek great delight in detachment, which is difficult to enjoy. Giving up the sensual pleasure with no hindrance, the wise man should cleanse himself of the impurities of the mind. (87-88)
# 13 88. He should focus his mind upon that exalted state (nirvana). Having given up all sense pleasures, possessing nothing, let the wise, cleansing the mind from defilements, purify the self. (88) A wise one should want delight there, having renounced the sense-pleasures,
without anything and having cleansed himself from the impurities of mind.
Giving up sensual pleasures,
With no attachment,
The wise man should cleanse himself
Of the impurities of the mind.
88. Giving up delight in sensuous pleasures the spiritually mature person, the man-of-no-possessions, should purify himself from (all) mental defilements. Let them desire that rare delight
renouncing pleasures, owing nought,
those wise ones should cleanse themselves
from all defilements of the mind.
# 14 89. Those whose minds have reached full excellence in the factors of enlightenment, who, having renounced acquisitiveness, rejoice in not clinging to things -- rid of cankers, glowing with wisdom, they have attained Nibbana in this very life. 89. Those whose minds are well trained in the Seven Factors of Enlightenment and who have rid themselves of all clinging, rejoice in having abandoned craving. Such ones, who have eradicated all moral intoxicants, have attained nibbāna even in this world. 89. They whose mind is rightly tempered
In the Wisdom's seven ways,
Who have left desire behind them,
Void of clinging, they rejoicing
Passionless and all-resplendent,
Even in this world are freed.
89. Those whose minds are well fixed upon the elements of enlightenment (sambodhi),(2) who, without hankering after anything, glory in renunciation, whose biases are extinguished, who are full of light, they indeed have attained the bliss of nirvana in this very world. Those whose minds are thoroughly practices in the factors of enlightenment, who find delight in freedom from attachment in the renunciation of clinging, free from the inflow of thoughts, they are like shining lights, having reached final liberation in the world. 89 89. Those whose mind is well grounded in the (seven) elements of knowledge, who without clinging to anything, rejoice in freedom from attachment, whose appetites have been conquered, and who are full of light, are free (even) in this world. (89) People, whose mind is truly well developed in the constituents of awakenment,
who are delighting in renunciation of attachments, without clinging,
with the taints removed and brilliant, they are completely emancipated in this world.
Whose minds are well perfected
In the Factors of Enlightenment,
Who without clinging, delight in detachment-
They, the corruption-free, radiant ones,
Have attained Nibbana in the Here-and-Now.
89. They whose minds have cultivated to perfection the Factors of Enlightenment and who, free from clinging, delight in the giving up of attachment, those bias-free radiant ones become Cool (nibbuta) even in this world (i.e., in this life). 89. They are serene in this world, whose mind is perfected in that clear thought which leads to Arahatship, whose delight is in re- nunciation, free from taints, and lustrous. Those who come to Wakening
with mind full-cultivated,
delight, no longer clinging,
in relinquishing attachment:
they, without pollution, radiant,
in this world have reach Nibbana.
14. For those whose mind is properly cultivated in the Limbs of Perfect Enlightenment, who have no attachment and enjoy in giving up of grasping, and who are free from the corruption, and shine pure in a radiance of light, then attain Nirvana even in this mortal world. (89)
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
VII Arahanta
vagga
The Arahant or Perfected One The Arahat The Arahat The Holy One The Enlightened The Venerable (Arhat) The Arahant The Worthy The Supremely Worthy The Arahat The Saints The Worthy/td>
# 1 90. The fever of passion exists not for him who has completed the journey, who is sorrowless and wholly set free, and has broken all ties. 90. They have completed their journey; they are freed from sorrow and from all else. The bonds of life have fallen from them, and the fever (of passions) no longer exists in them. 90. He for whom life's journey's over, free from sorrow, free from pain
Who has all the knots unfastened, suffering knows not again.
90. The fever of passion afflicts not the holy one (arahant), who has completed his samsaric journey (cycle of rebirths), who is free from sorrow, absolutely emancipated, and who has destroyed all knots of attachment. Journey over, sorrowless, freed in every way, and with all bonds broken -- for such a man there is no more distress. 90 90. There is no suffering for him who has finished his journey, and abandoned grief, who has freed himself on all sides, and thrown off all fetters. (90) Pain does not exist for one, who has finished the journey, is without sorrow, who is emancipated in every respect and who has abandoned all bonds. For him who has completed his journey course
For him who is wholly free from all,
For him who has destroyed all bonds
The fever of passion exists not.
90. The burning fever of passion does not exist for one who has finished his journey (i.e., completed his spiritual evolution), who is free from sorrow, wholly emancipated, and released from all the bonds (of conditionality). 90. No remorse is found in him whose journey is accomplished, whose sorrow ended, whose free- dom complete, whose chains are all shaken off. With journey finished and sorrowless, from everything completely free, for one who has loosened all the ties passion’s fever is not found. 1. For those who have completed the journey, left sorrow behind, being completely free from everything and destroyed all bondage, the fever of passion does not exist. (90)
# 2 91. The mindful ones exert themselves. They are not attached to any home; like swans that abandon the lake, they leave home after home behind. 91. The thoughtful strive diligently. They take no delight in home-life, but forsake home after home, as swans leave the lake. 91. Household life for them no joys hath; striving and intent in mind
As the swan deserts the marshes, every home they leave behind.
91. Mindful ones constantly strive, they do not cling to a dwelling place; like swans that abandon a lake, the holy ones abandon house and home. The recollected go forth to lives of renunciation. They take no pleasure in a fixed abode. Like wild swans abandoning a pool, they leave one resting place after another. 91 91. They depart with their thoughts well-collected, they are not happy in their abode; like swans who have left their lake, they leave their house and home. (91) Mindful ones depart; they do not find delight in houses. They abandon every abode, just like swans leave a pond. The mindful ones who leave their homes
To no abode are they attached;
Like swans that quit their pools,
Home after home they leave behind.
91. The mindful who leave home do not delight in an abode; like wild geese quitting a lake, they abandon whatever security they have. 91. The mindful press on, casting no look behind to their home-life ; as swans deserting a pool they leave their dear home. Mindful Ones exert themselves, in no abode do they delight, as swans abandoning their lake home after home they leave behind. 2. The mindful people exert themselves, and do not like to remain in the same place. Like swans that leave their pools and go home after home. (91)
# 3 92. Those who do not accumulate and are wise regarding food, whose object is the Void, the Unconditioned Freedom -- their track cannot be traced, like that of birds in the air. 92. Arahats accumulate nothing. When taking food, they reflect over it with full understanding of its nature. Their sole goal is liberation, which is void and signless. Like the flight of birds in the sky, their path cannot be traced. 92. They who gather up no treasure, feeding on the food that's known,
They who range in mind the Void, the unconditioned formless Space,
As the bird's path in the ether, so their ways are hard to trace.
92. Those who have no accumulation (of worldly possessions), who have a well-regulated diet, who are within range of perfect deliverance through realization of the Void and the conditionlessness of all forms (sunnata and animitta), their holy path is as difficult to trace as is the track of birds in the air. Those for whom there is no more acquisition, who are fully aware of the nature of food, whose dwelling place is an empty and imageless release -- the way of such people is hard to follow, like the path of birds through the sky. 92 92. Men who have no riches, who live on recognised food, who have perceived void and unconditioned freedom (Nirvana), their path is difficult to understand, like that of birds in the air. (92) Those, who do not accumulate and have well understood food, whose sphere is the void emancipation without attributes - their course is difficult to find out - like the course of the birds in the sky. Those for whom there is no accumulation,
Who reflect well over their food,
Who have perceived void and unconditioned freedom -
Their path is hard to trace,
Like that of birds in the air.
92. Those who do not accumulate (material or mental possessions), who thoroughly understand (the true nature of) the food they eat, and whose range of experience (lit., pasture) is liberation through (the realization of) the Empty (sunna) and Unconditioned (animitta), their path, like that of birds in the sky, is difficult to trace. 92. Some there are who have no treasure here, temperate ones whose goal is the freedom which comes of realising that life is empty and impermanent : their steps are hard to track as the flight of birds through the sky. For those who don’t accumulate, who well reflect upon their food, they have as range the nameless and the void of perfect freedom too. As birds that wing through space, hard to trace their going. 3. For those who have no accumulation, who eat the right food of life, and who have deliverance that is void and signless, they are the objects in the path that cannot be traced, like birds flying in the air. (92)
# 4 93. He whose cankers are destroyed and who is not attached to food, whose object is the Void, the Unconditioned Freedom -- his path cannot be traced, like that of birds in the air. 93. Arahats are free from cankers; they are not attached to food. Their sole goal is liberation, which is void and signless. Like the flight of birds in the sky, their path cannot be traced. 93. They whose taints are all evanished, independent of support,
They who range in mind the Void, the unconditioned, formless Space,
As the bird's path in the ether, so their tracks are hard to trace.
93. He whose mental attachments are extinguished, who is not immoderate in food, who is within range of perfect deliverance through realization of the Void and the conditionlessness of all forms, his holy path is as difficult to trace as is the track of birds in the air. He whose inflowing thoughts are dried up, who is unattached to food, whose dwelling place is an empty and imageless release -- the way of such a person is hard to follow, like the path of birds through the sky. 93 93. He whose appetites are stilled, who is not absorbed in enjoyment, who has perceived void and unconditioned freedom (Nirvana), his path is difficult to understand, like that of birds in the air. (93) Whose taints are completely removed, who is not attached to food, whose sphere is the void emancipation without attributes - his course is difficult to find out - like the path of the birds in the sky. He whose corruptions are destroyed,
He who is not attached to food,
He who has perceived void and unconditioned freedom -
His track cannot be traced,
Like that of birds in the air.
93. He whose impurities are extinct, who is not attached to food, and whose range of experience (lit., pasture) is liberation through (the realization of) the Empty (sunna) and Unconditioned (animitta), his path, like that of birds in the sky, is difficult to trace. 93. He whose taints are purged away, who is indifferent to food, whose goal is the freedom which comes of realising life's emptiness and transciency, is hard to track as the flight of birds in the sky. For whom pollutions are destroyed, not attached to any food, he has as range the nameless and the void of perfect freedom too. As birds that wing through space, hard to trace his going. 4. For those whose corruptions are destroyed, who are not attached to food, and who has deliverance that is void and signless, they are the objects in the path that cannot be traced, like birds flying in the sky. (93)
# 5 94. Even the gods hold dear the wise one, whose senses are subdued like horses well trained by a charioteer, whose pride is destroyed and who is free from the cankers. 94. Even the gods cherish such steadfast ones, whose sense faculties are calm, like horses well-trained by charioteers, and who are free from pride and cankers. 94. He whose senses now are tranquil, like a horse by trainer tamed
(Pride struck off, the taints evanished), to the very gods is famed.
94. He whose senses are subdued, like horses well trained by a charioteer, whose pride is destroyed and who is free from corruption, even the gods cherish such a one. When a man's senses have come to peace, like a horses well broken by the trainer, when he is rid of conceit and without inflowing thoughts -- even devas envy such a well set man. 94 94. The gods even envy him whose senses, like horses well broken in by the driver, have been subdued, who is free from pride, and free from appetites. (94) Whose senses are quieted, just like horses well tamed by the charioteer, even the gods do envy such one, who has abandoned pride and is free from taints. He whose senses are subdued,
Like steeds well-trained by a charioteer;
He who is free from pride and corruption -
Such a steadfast one even the gods hold dear.
94. He whose senses are pacified like horses well controlled by the charioteer, who has eradicated conceit and who is free from impurities – the very gods love a man of such (good) qualities (as these). 94. Even the gods emulate him whose senses are quiet as horses well-tamed by the charioteer, who has renounced self-will, and put away all taints. Whose faculties are pacified as steeds by charioteers well-tamed, with pride abandoned, unpolluted, to even devas this One’s dear. 5. For those who subdue their senses, like the charioteers trained and controlled their horses, and who destroy their pride and is free from the corruptions, they are admired even by the gods. (94)
# 6 95. There is no more worldly existence for the wise one who, like the earth, resents nothing, who is firm as a high pillar and as pure as a deep pool free from mud. 95. Like the earth, Arahats are patient and cannot be provoked to respond in anger. They stand firm and steady, like a column. They are serene and pure, like a lake without mud. They are free from the cycle of birth and death. 95. Like the solid ground unshaken, like the threshold of a door,
Like a pool by mud unsullied, such a saint is born no more.
95. He who is unperturbed like the earth, who is steadfast like Indra's post (in the portal of a city), whose character is as pure and translucent as a clear lake, to such a holy one there are no further cycles of rebirth (samsara). Like the earth he is not disturbed, like a great pillar he is firmly set and reliable, like a lake he is free from defilement. There are no more rebirths for such a well set man. 95 95. Such a one who does his duty is tolerant like the earth, like Indra's bolt; he is like a lake without mud; no new births are in store for him. (95) Such a one, who is not obstructed, just like the earth, who is similar to the Indra's stake, who is virtuous, who is like a lake without mud - for such a one there is no more round of rebirth. Like the earth the worthy one resents not;
Like the chief post is he of a firm mind;
Like an unsullied pool is he of pure conduct;
To such a one life's wanderings are no more.
95. Like the earth, he offers no opposition; like the main pillar (of the city gate), he stands firm. He is (pure) like a lake free from mud. For a man of such (good) qualities (as these) there are no more wanderings (from life to life). 95. No more will he be born whose patience is as the earth's, who is firm as a pillar and pious, pure as some unruffled lake. Like earth is one who’s well-behaved, secure and not resentful, as city-post, as filth-free lake, no wanderings-on for One Who’s Thus. 6. A balanced and well-disciplined person does not resent like the earth. He is comparable to an Indakhila, (i.e. a firm column). He is not sullied by mud like a pool. He does not wander (in Samsara) for such a balanced life. (95)
# 7 96. Calm is his thought, calm his speech, and calm his deed, who, truly knowing, is wholly freed, perfectly tranquil and wise. 96. Wisdom has stilled their minds, and their thoughts, words, and deeds are filled with peace. Truly knowing the Dhamma, they are free from moral defilements and are unperturbed by the ups and downs of life. 96. Calm the mind of such a being, calm his thoughts and words and deeds,
Set free by the perfect knowledge, liberated from life's needs.
96. His mind becomes calm. His word and deed are calm. Such is the state of tranquillity of one who has attained to deliverance through the realization of truth. Freed by full realisation and at peace, the mind of such a man is at peace, and his speech and action peaceful. 96 96. His thought is quiet, quiet are his word and deed, when he has obtained freedom by true knowledge, when he has thus become a quiet man. (96) Peaceful is his mind; peaceful are his speech and deeds – of such a one, who is freed by the right knowledge and tranquil. Calm is his mind;
Calm is his speech;
Calm is his bodily action;
Who, through right knowledge, is wholly freed,
Perfectly peaceful and equipoised.
96. Tranquil is the thought, tranquil the word and deed, of that supremely tranquil person who is emancipated through Perfect Knowledge. 96. Calm is the thought, calm the words and deeds of such a one, who has by wisdom attained true freedom and self-control. Peaceful his mind and peaceful his speech and actions too, perfect in knowledge of freedom, One Thus is of utmost peace. 7. His mind is calm. His speech is calm. His action is calm. He knows correctly that he is completely freed, perfectly peaceful and steadily balanced. (96)
# 8 97. The man who is without blind faith, who knows the Uncreate, who has severed all links, destroyed all causes (for karma, good and evil), and thrown out all desires -- he, truly, is the most excellent of men. 97. Those who are not credulous, who have realized the unconditioned, who have cut off the links of the round of rebirths, who have destroyed all consequences of good and bad deeds, who have discarded all craving, are indeed the noblest of all. 97. Self-dependent, self-sufficing, knower of the Uncreate
Who hath loosed the bonds of action, from the chain of births set free,
All desires are fallen from him, noblest of all beings he.
97. He who is not credulous, who knows the nature of the Uncreated (akata), who has severed all the bonds (of rebirth), who has destroyed all the influxes of evil and given up all cravings, he, indeed, is noblest among men. He has no need for faith who knows the uncreated, who has cut off rebirth, who has destroyed any opportunity for good or evil, and cast away all desire. He is indeed the ultimate man. 97 97. The man who is free from credulity, but knows the uncreated, who has cut all ties, removed all temptations, renounced all desires, he is the greatest of men. (97) A man who is not blindly trusting, who knows the Nirvana, who has broken the connections, who has cut off the opportunities and who has given up all wishes - he is a greatest person indeed. He who is not credulous,
He who knows the uncreated,
He who has severed all ties,
He who has put an end to opportunity,
He who has removed all desires
He, indeed, is the greatest of men.
97. He is a superior man (uttamaporiso) who does not (merely) believe (but) who knows the Unmade, who has severed all links (with conditioned existence), put an end to the occasions (of good and evil), and who has renounced (lit., vomited up) all worldly hopes. 97. Excellent is the man who is not credulous, who knows Nirvana, who has cut all bonds, destroyed the germs of rebirth, cast off lust. With no beliefs, the Unmade known, with fetters finally severed, with kammas cut and craving shed, attained to humanity’s heights. 8. For a man who is free from credulous beliefs, who understands the eternal, Nirvana, who cuts off the links, who has put an end to occasion (of good and evil), and who eschews all desires, he is indeed a supreme man. (97)
# 9 98. Inspiring, indeed, is that place where Arahats dwell, be it a village, a forest, a vale, or a hill. 98. They make holy wherever they dwell, in a village or a forest, in a valley or on a hill. 98. In the village or the forest, on the water or the ground,
Where the worthy ones are dwelling, there the earth's delights are found.
98. That spot is truly delightful where the Holy Ones (arahant) reside, be it village or forest, valley or high ground. Whether in the village or the forest, whether on high ground or low, wherever the enlightened live, that is a delightful spot. 98 98. In a hamlet or in a forest, in the deep water or on the dry land, wherever venerable persons (Arhanta) dwell, that place is delightful. (98) In the village or in the forest, in the valley or on the hill - wherever Arahants live, that place is pleasant. Whether in village or in forest,
Whether in vale or on hill,
Wherever the Worthy Ones dwell,
Delightful, indeed, is that spot.
98. Whether village or forest, plain or hill, delightful is that spot where the (Supremely) Worthy dwell. 98. In the village or the jungle, on sea or land, wherever lives the Arahat, there is the place of delight. Whether in town or woods, whether in vale, on hill, wherever dwell the Arahats so pleasing there the earth. 9. Wherever the Arhats dwell in a village or in a forest, in a valley or on a hill, that spot is a place of delight. (98)
# 10 99. Inspiring are the forests in which worldlings find no pleasure. There the passionless will rejoice, for they seek no sensual pleasures.T 99. With their senses at peace and their minds full of joy, they take delight in secluded forests, where worldlings are loath to go. 99. Ah! delightful are the forests! where the worldling finds no joy,
There the passionless find pleasure, whom the senses do not cloy.
99. Charming are the forests which do not attract the multitudes. But the holy ones, free from attachments, find delight in them for they are not seekers after the allurements of the senses. Delightful for them are the forests where men find no delight. The desire-free find delight there, for they seek no sensual joys. 99 99. Forests are delightful; where the world finds no delight, there the passionless will find delight, for they look not for pleasures. (99) Delightful are the forests, where the crowd doesn't find delight. Those free of passion will find delight there. They are not seeking pleasures. Delightful are the forests
Where worldings find no joy,
There the passionless rejoice
For they seek no sensual pleasures.
99. Delightful are the forests where ordinary people find no pleasure. Those who are free from passion delight (in them), (for) they do not go in quest of sensuous enjoyment. 99. Pleasant are the glades where the herd come not to disport themselves : there shall the Holy take their pleasure, who seek not after lust. Delightful are the forests where folk do not delight, there the Passionless delight, they’re not pleasure-seekers. 10. Forests are delightful where other people do not because the one who is free from passion rejoices therein seeking no sensual pleasure. (99)
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
VIII Sahassa
vagga
The Thousands Thousands Thousands The Thousands The Thousands The Thousands The Thousand The Thousands The Thousands The Thousands Thousands Thousands
# 1 100. Better than a thousand useless words is one useful word, hearing which one attains peace. 100. Better than a speech of a thousand words that are senseless and unconnected with the realization of nibbāna is one thoughtful word that brings peace to the mind. 100. Tho' one's speech be a thousand words,
Vain words all strung together,
Better a single phrase
Which calms the one that hears.
100. A single word full of meaning, hearing which one becomes at peace, is better than a thousand words which are empty of meaning. Better than a thousand pointless words is one saying to the point on hearing which one finds peace. 100 100. Even though a speech be a thousand (of words), but made up of senseless words, one word of sense is better, which if a man hears, he becomes quiet. (100) Rather then a thousand speeches without meaningful words, is better one meaningful word, after hearing which, one can attain calm. Better than a thousand useless words
Is one beneficial single word,
Hearing which one is pacified.
100. Better than a thousand meaningless words collected together (in the Vedic oral tradition) is a single meaningful word on hearing which one becomes tranquil. 100. Better than a thousand empty words is one pregnant word, which brings the hearer peace. Through a thousand speeches be composed of meaningless lines, better the single meaningful line one hears, then comes to calm. 1. Better than a thousand useless words is one single beneficial word, by hearing which, one is pacified. (100)
# 2 101. Better than a thousand useless verses is one useful verse, hearing which one attains peace. 101. Better than a poem of a thousand verses that are senseless and unconnected with the realization of nibbāna is one thoughtful line of verse that brings peace to the mind. 101. Tho' a song have a thousand words,
Vain words all strung together,
Better a single verse
Which calms the one that hears.
101. A single couplet pregnant with meaning, hearing which one becomes at peace, is better than a thousand couplets composed of meaningless words. Better than a thousand pointless verses is one stanza on hearing which one finds peace. 101 101. Even though a Gatha (poem) be a thousand (of words), but made up of senseless words, one word of a Gatha is better, which if a man hears, he becomes quiet. (101) Rather then a thousand verses without meaningful words, is better one word of a verse, after hearing which, one can attain calm. Better than a thousand useless verses
Is one beneficial single line,
Hearing which one is pacified.
101. Better than a thousand meaningless verses collected together (in the Vedic oral tradition) is one (meaningful) line of verse on hearing which one becomes tranquil. 101. Better than a thousand idle songs is a single song, which brings the hearer peace. Though a thousand verses be composed of meaningless lines, better the single line of verse one hears, then comes to calm. 2. Better than a thousand useless verses is one beneficial single verse, by hearing which, one is pacified. (101)
# 3 102. Better than reciting a hundred meaningless verses is the reciting of one verse of Dhamma, hearing which one attains peace. 102. Better than the recitation of a hundred verses that are senseless and unconnected with the realization of nibbāna is one word of the Dhamma that brings peace to the mind. 102. Tho' one utter a hundred songs,
Vain words all strung together,
Better one verse of the Norm
Which brings peace to the hearer
102. One word of the Dhamma, hearing which one becomes at peace, is better than the utterance of a hundred verses which consist of superficial words. Better than reciting a hundred pointless verses is one verse of the teaching (one dhammapada) on hearing which one finds peace. 102 102. Though a man recite a hundred Gathas made up of senseless words, one word of the law is better, which if a man hears, he becomes quiet. (102) Who should say even a hundred verses without meaningful words, better is one verse on the Dharma, after hearing which, one can attain calm. Should one recite a hundred useless verses,
Better is one single word of the Dhamma,
Hearing which one is pacified.
102. Though one should recite a hundred (Vedic) verses, (verses) without meaning, better is one line (or: a single word) of Dhamma on hearing which one becomes tranquil. 102. Better it is to chant one verse of the law, that brings the hearer peace, than to chant a hundred empty songs. Though a thousand verses chant composed of meaningless lines, better the single Dhamma-line one hears, then comes to calm. 3. Should one recites a hundred useless verses, better is one single word of the Dharma, by hearing which, one is pacified. (102)
# 4 103. Though one may conquer a thousand times a thousand men in battle, yet he indeed is the noblest victor who conquers himself. 103. One who conquers oneself is greater than another who conquers a thousand times a thousand men on the battlefield. 103. Tho' one conquer a thousand times
A thousand men in battle,
Who conquers self alone
Is the best of conquerors.
103. Though one were to conquer a million men in battle, that man who conquers himself is the greater victor. Though one were to defeat thousands upon thousands of men in battle, if another were to overcome just one -- himself, he is the supreme victor. 103 103. If one man conquer in battle a thousand times thousand men, and if another conquer himself, he is the greatest of conquerors. (103) If one should conquer thousands of people in the battle, and if one should conquer just one thing - himself, he indeed is the victor of the highest battle. Though one should conquer in battle
A thousand times a thousand men,
Yet should one conquer just oneself
One is indeed the greatest victor.
103. Though one should conquer in battle thousands upon thousands of men, yet he who conquers himself is (truly) the greatest in battle. 103. If one were to conquer a thousand thousand in the battle he who conquers self is the greatest warrior. Though thousand times a thousand in battle one may conquer, yet should one conquer just oneself one is the greatest conqueror. 4. Though one conquers a million people in battle, he is the noblest victor who has conquered himself. (103)
# 5 104-105. Self-conquest is far better then the conquest of others. Not even a god, an angel, Mara or Brahma can turn into defeat the victory of a person who is self-subdued and ever restrained in conduct. 104—105. It is better to be victorious over yourself than to conquer others. When you attain victory over yourself, neither the gods nor Māra can turn it into defeat. 104. Tis better to conquer self
Than all this multitude;
If one be self-subdued
And ever self-controlled,
104,105. To overcome one's own self is indeed better than to conquer others.
Neither god nor demigod, nor Mara with Brahma, can undo the victory of him who has subjugated himself and who practices self-restraint.
Victory over oneself is better than that over others. When a man has conquered himself and always acts with self-control, neither devas, spirits, Mara or Brahma can reverse the victory of a man like that. 104, 105 104, 105. One's own self conquered is better than all other people; not even a god, a Gandharva, not Mara with Brahman could change into defeat the victory of a man who has vanquished himself, and always lives under restraint. (104) It is better to conquer oneself than to conquer other people. Of a person, who tamed himself, who is always acting with self-control, [Continued in 105] Better indeed is it to conquer oneself,
Neither a god nor a Gandhabba,
Neither Mara nor Brahma
Could turn into defeat the victory of such a man
Who is self-mastered and self-controlled.
104. It is indeed better to conquer oneself than to conquer other people. Of a man who has subdued himself, (and) who lives (self-)controlled, 104, 105. Self-conquest is better than other victories : neither god nor demi-god, neither Mara nor Brahma, can undo the victory of such a one, who is self -controlled and always calm. Greater the conquest of oneself than subjugating others, that one who’s always self-restrained, that one who’s tamed of self . 5-6. Self-conquest is indeed, far greater than the conquest of all other people; neither a god nor a Gandhabba nor Mara with Brahma can win back the victory of such a person who is self-subdued and self-disciplined. (104-105)
# 6 105. Not the gods or demi-gods
Nor the Lord of the world below
Nor the God Supreme have power
To undo his victory.
(105) [continued from 104] not a god, not a Gandharva, not Mara with Brahma, can turn into defeat the victory of a person of such form. Better indeed is it to conquer oneself,
Neither a god nor a Gandhabba,
Neither Mara nor Brahma
Could turn into defeat the victory of such a man
Who is self-mastered and self-controlled.
105. neither a god nor a celestial musician (gandhabba), nor Mara together with Brahma, can undo the victory – the victory of a person who is (subdued and controlled) like that. Neither deva nor minstrel divine, nor Mara together with Brahma, can overthrow the victory of such a one as this.
# 7 106. Though month after month for a hundred years one should offer sacrifices by the thousands, yet if only for a moment one should worship those of perfected minds that honor is indeed better than a century of sacrifice. 106. Better than performing a thousand rituals month after month for a hundred years is paying homage, even if only for a moment, to one living in wisdom. 106. Tho' one for a hundred years
Month after month should pray
With a thousand offerings,
Yet if for a moment's space
He worship the feet of one
Whose self is self-subdued,
His worship is better far
Than his age-long offerings.
106. Were a man month after month for a hundred years to offer sacrifices by the thousands, and were he to pay homage even for a moment to one who is self-governed, that homage is superior to the sacrifices of a hundred years. Though one were to perform sacrifices by the thousand month after month for a hundred years, if another were to pay homage to a single inwardly perfected man for just a moment, that homage is better than the hundred years of sacrifices. 106 106. If a man for a hundred years sacrifice month after month with a thousand, and if he but for one moment pay homage to a man whose soul is grounded (in true knowledge), better is that homage than sacrifice for a hundred years. (106) If one should sacrifice every month thousand times even by hundreds, and if one should even for a moment pay respects to somebody, who has developed himself, then such a devotion is better than hundred years of sacrifice. Though month after month, with a thousand,
One should sacrifice for a hundred years,
Yet, if only for a moment,
One should honour the self-restrained,
That honour, indeed, is better
Than a century of sacrifice.
106. If month after month for a hundred years one should offer sacrifices by the thousand, and if for a single moment one should venerate a (spiritually) developed person, better is that (act of) veneration than the hundred years (of sacrifices). 106. If month by month throughout a hundred years one were to offer sacrifices costing thou- sands, and if for a moment another were to reverence the self-controlled this is the better worship. Month by month for a hundred years a thousand one might sacrifice, but if for only a moment one might honour the self-developed, such honour were better by far than century of sacrifice. 7. Even if one makes an offering a thousand times every month for a hundred years, if one honors a sage who has perfected himself, for even a moment, that honor is better than what is sacrificed in a century. (106)
# 8 107. Though for a hundred years one should tend the sacrificial fire in the forest, yet if only for a moment one should worship those of perfected minds, that worship is indeed better than a century of sacrifice. 107. Better than tending the sacrificial fire in the forest for a hundred years is paying homage, even if only for a moment, to one living in wisdom. 107. Tho' a hundred years in the woods
One tend the sacred fire,
Yet if for a moment's space
He worship the feet of one
Whose self is self-subdued;
Such worship is better far
Than his age-long offerings
107. Were a man for a hundred years to tend the sacrificial fire in the forest, and were he to pay homage even for a moment to one who is self-governed, that homage is superior to the fire-sacrifice of a hundred years. Though one were to tend the sacrificial fire for a hundred years in the forest, if another were to pay homage to a single inwardly perfected man for just a moment, that homage is better than the hundred years of sacrifice. 107 107. If a man for a hundred years worship Agni (fire) in the forest, and if he but for one moment pay homage to a man whose soul is grounded (in true knowledge), better is that homage than sacrifice for a hundred years. (107) Whatever person should worship fire in the forest for hundred years, and if one should even for a moment pay respects to somebody, who has developed himself, then such a devotion is better than hundred years of sacrifice. Though one for a century,
Should tend the fire in the forest,
Yet, if only for a moment,
He should honour the self-restrained,
That honour, indeed, is better
Than a century of sacrifice.
107. Though one should tend the sacred fire in the forest for a hundred years, yet if he venerates a (spiritually) developed person even for a moment, better is that (act of) veneration than the hundred years (spent tending the sacred fire). 107. If one for a hundred years tended the sacred fire in the glade, and another for a moment reverenced the self-con trolled, this is the better worship. One might tend for a hundred years the forest’s sacred fire, but if for only a moment one might honour the self-developed, such honour were better by far than centuries of sacrifice. 8. Even if one tends the (sacred) fire in the forest for a hundred years, if one honors a sage who has perfected himself, for even a moment, that honor is better than what is sacrificed in a century. (107)
# 9 108. Whatever gifts and oblations one seeking merit might offer in this world for a whole year, all that is not worth one fourth of the merit gained by revering the Upright Ones, which is truly excellent. 108. Making gifts and sacrificial offerings, great and small, for a whole year to earn merit is not worth a quarter of the honor paid to the Noble Ones who walk the right path. 108. Not all the sacrifice
That is offered in all the world
For a year, with a view to gain,
Is worth a single quarter
Of the worship that is paid
To the upright holy man.
108. Whatever offering or sacrifice a person, who is desirous of gaining merit, may make throughout the course of a year, that is not worth one fourth of the merit acquired by homage paid to one of upright life. All the sacrifices and offerings a man desiring merit could make in a year in the world are not worth a quarter of the better merit of homage to the righteous. 108 108. Whatever a man sacrifice in this world as an offering or as an oblation for a whole year in order to gain merit, the whole of it is not worth a quarter (a farthing); reverence shown to the righteous is better. (108) Whatever sacrifice or oblation in the world might someone sacrifice in a year, looking for merit, all that is not worth one fourth. Showing respect to those of upright conduct is better. Whatever oblations and sacrifices
One might offer for a year,
Seeking merit hereby,
All that is not worth a single quarter.
Better is homage towards the upright.
108. Whatever oblations and sacrifices one might offer here on earth in the course of the whole (Vedic) religious year, seeking to gain merit thereby, all that is not a quarter (as meritorious) as paying respect to those who live uprightly, which is (indeed) excellent. 108. Whatsoever sacrifice or offering a man makes for a full year in hope of benefits, all is not worth a quarter of that better offering reverence to the upright. Whatever one who merit seeks should for a year make sacrifice, all comes not to a quarter part of honouring the Noble. 9. Whatever gift or alms are offered for a year in this world in order to seek merit, all of that is less than a single quarter of the reverence towards the upright people. (108)
# 10 109. To one ever eager to revere and serve the elders, these four blessing accrue: long life and beauty, happiness and power. 109. To those who respect and honor the wise and follow them, four gifts will come in increasing measure: health, happiness, beauty, and long life. 109. Whoso hath reverence
For those advanced in years,
Four blessings thrive for him,
Life, beauty, bliss and strength.
109. In him, who always honors and respects the aged, four conditions will increase: longevity, beauty, happiness and strength. Four principal things increase in the man who is respectful and always honours his elders -- length of life, good looks, happiness and health. 109 109. He who always greets and constantly reveres the aged, four things will increase to him, viz. life, beauty, happiness, power. (109) For somebody, who is showing respect to those of virtuous character, who is always paying homage to the venerable ones, four things grow for him: life-span, beauty of complexion, happiness, strength. He who ever reverences and respects elders
Four qualities for him increase:
Long life, fame, happiness and strengh.
109. For him who is of a reverential disposition, four things constantly increase: life, beauty, happiness, and strength. 109. In him who is trained in constant courtesy and reverence to the old, four qualities increase : length of days, beauty, gladness, and strength. For one of respectful nature who ever the elders honours, long life and beauty, joy and strength, these qualities increase. 10. For one who is in the habit of constantly honoring and respecting the elders, one’s four blessings increase — age, beauty, bliss and strength. (109)
# 11 110. Better it is to live one day virtuous and meditative than to live a hundred years immoral and uncontrolled. 110. Better than living for a hundred years with those who are immoral and who have no control over their senses is one day living with those who are virtuous and who cultivate calm abiding and insight meditation. 110. Tho' one live a hundred years,
Immoral, uncontrolled,
'Tis better to live for a day,
Moral and well controlled.
110. One day's life of an Arhat who is virtuous and contemplative is better than a hundred years of life of one who is dissolute and of uncontrolled mind. Though one were to live a hundred years immoral and with a mind unstilled by meditation, the life of a single day is better if one is moral and practises meditation. 110 110. But he who lives a hundred years, vicious and unrestrained, a life of one day is better if a man is virtuous and reflecting. (110) Who would live for hundred years, with bad morality, without a firm mind, better is the life for one day of somebody who is virtuous and meditating. Though one should live a hundred years,
Without conduct and concentration,
Yet, better is a single day's life
Of one who is moral and meditative.
110. Though one should live a hundred years unethical and unintegrated (asamahita), better is one single day lived ethically and absorbed (in higher meditative states). 110. Better than a hundred years of impure and intemperate existence is a single day of moral, contemplative life. Though one should live a hundred years foolish, uncontrolled, yet better is life for a single day moral and meditative. 11. It is better to have a single day in one’s life, which is moral and meditative, than to have a hundred years in one’s life, which is immoral and uncontrolled. (110)
# 12 111. Better it is to live one day wise and meditative than to live a hundred years foolish and uncontrolled. 111. Better than living for a hundred years with those who are ignorant and who have no control over their senses is one day living with those who are wise and who cultivate calm abiding and insight meditation. 111. Tho' one live a hundred years
Foolish and uncontrolled,
'Tis better to live for a day
Wisely and well controlled.
111. One day's life of him who is wise and contemplative is better than a life of a hundred years of one who is unwise and of uncontrolled mind. Though one were to live a hundred years without wisdom and with a mind unstilled by meditation, the life of a single day is better if one is wise and practises meditation. 111 111. And he who lives a hundred years, ignorant and unrestrained, a life of one day is better if a man is wise and reflecting. (111) Who would live for hundred years, without wisdom, without a firm mind, better is the life for one day of somebody who is wise and meditating. Though one should live a hundred years,
Without wisdom and concentration,
Yet, better is a single day's life
Of one who is wise and meditative.
111. Though one should live a hundred years of evil understanding and unintegrated, better is one single day lived possessed of wisdom and absorbed (in higher meditative states). 111. Better is one day of wise and contem- plative life than a thousand years of folly and intemperance. Though one should live a hundred years foolish, uncontrolled, yet better is life for a single day wise and meditative. 12. It is better to have a single day in one’s life, which is wise and meditative, than to have a hundred years in one’s life, which is without wisdom and control. (111)
# 13 112. Better it is to live one day strenuous and resolute than to live a hundred years sluggish and dissipated. 112. Better than living for a hundred years with those who are idle and inactive is one day living with those who make zealous and strenuous effort (to cultivate calm abiding and insight meditation). 112. Tho' one live a hundred years
Listless and lacking zeal,
'Tis better to live for a day
While striving manfully.
112. One day's life of a person who is vigorous and resolute is better than a life of a hundred years of him who is weak and indolent. Though one were to live a hundred years lazy and effortless, the life of a single day is better if one makes a real effort. 112 112. And he who lives a hundred years, idle and weak, a life of one day is better if a man has attained firm strength. (112) Who would live for hundred years, indolent and of poor effort, better is the life for one day of somebody who has undertaken a firm effort. Though one should live a hundred years,
Sluggish and inactive
Yet, better is a single day's life
Of one who intensely exerts himself.
112. Better than a hundred years lived lazily and with inferior energy is one single day lived with energy aroused and fortified./td> 112. Better one day of earnest energy than a hundred years of sloth and lassitude. Though one should live a hundred years lazy, of little effort, yet better is life for a single day strongly making effort. 13. It is better to have a single day in one’s life, which makes an internse effort than to have a hundred year in one’s life, which is idle and inactive. (112)
# 14 113. Better it is to live one day seeing the rise and fall of things than to live as hundred years without ever seeing the rise and fall of things. 113. Better than living for a hundred years with those who do not perceive the arising and dissolution of the five aggregates is one day living with those who perceive the arising and dissolution of the five aggregates. 113. Tho' one live a hundred years
Blind to the rise and fall,
'Tis better to live for a day
Seeing the rise and fall.
113. A single day's life of one who clearly sees the origin and cessation (of all composite things), is better than a hundred years of life of him who does not perceive the origin and cessation of things. Though one were to live a hundred years without seeing the rise and passing of things, the life of a single day is better if one sees the rise and passing of things. 113 113. And he who lives a hundred years, not seeing beginning and end, a life of one day is better if a man sees beginning and end. (113) Who would live for hundred years, not seeing rise and fall of things, better is the life for one day of somebody who is seeing their rise and fall. Better is a single day's life of one
Who discerns the rise and fall of things
Than a hundred years's life of one
Who is not comprehending.
113. Better than a hundred years lived unaware of the rise and fall (of conditioned things) is one single day lived aware of the rise and fall (of conditioned things). 113. Better one day of insight into the fleeting nature of the things of sense, than a hundred years of blindness to this transiency. Though one should live a hundred years not seeing rise and fall, yet better is life for a single day seeing rise and fall. 14. It is better to have a single day in one’s life, which comprehends how all things rise and pass away, than to have one hundred years in one’s life, which does not comprehend how all things rise and pass away. (113)
# 15 114. Better it is to live one day seeing the Deathless than to live a hundred years without ever seeing the Deathless. 114. Better than living for a hundred years with those who do not perceive the deathless state is one day living with those who perceive the deathless state. 114. Tho' one live a hundred years
And see not the Deathless State,
'Tis better to live for a day
And see the Deathless State.
114. A single day's life of one who perceives the immortal state is far better than if one were to live a hundred years without perceiving this state. Though one were to live a hundred years without seeing the deathless state, the life of a single day is better if one sees the deathless state. 114 114. And he who lives a hundred years, not seeing the immortal place, a life of one day is better if a man sees the immortal place. (114) Who would live for hundred years, not seeing the state of deathlessness, better is the life for one day of somebody who is seeing the state of deathlessness. Better is a single day's life of one
Who sees the Deathless
Than a hundred years's life of one
Who sees not that state.
114. Better than a hundred years lived unaware of the Deathless State is one single day lived aware of the Deathless State. 114. Better one day of insight into the deathless state [Nirvana], than a hundred years of blindness to this immortality. Though one should live a hundred years not seeing the Deathless State, yet better is life for a single day seeing Deathlessness. 15. It is better to have a single day in one’s life, which sees one’s own immorality, than to have one hundred years in one’s life, which does not see one’s own immortality. (114)
# 16 115. Better it is to live one day seeing the Supreme Truth than to live a hundred years without ever seeing the Supreme Truth. 115. Better than living for a hundred years with those who do not comprehend the Noble Dhamma is one day living with those who comprehend the Noble Dhamma. 115. Tho' one live a hundred years
And see not the Norm Supreme,
'Tis better to live for a day
And see the Norm Supreme.
115. A single day's life of one who realizes the Sublime Truth is indeed better than a life of a hundred years of one who does not realize the Sublime Truth. Though one were to live a hundred years without seeing the supreme truth, the life of a single day is better if one sees the supreme truth. 115 115. And he who lives a hundred years, not seeing the highest law, a life of one day is better if a man sees the highest law. (115) Who would live for hundred years, not seeing the highest Law, better is the life for one day of somebody who is seeing the highest Law. Better is a single day's life of one
Who understands the truth sublime
Than a hundred years's life of one
Who knows not that truth, so high.
115. Better than a hundred years lived unaware of the Supreme Truth (dhammam uttamam) is one single day lived aware of the Supreme Truth. 115. Better one day of insight into the Supreme Law, than a hundred years of blindness to that Law. Though one should live a hundred years not seeing Dhamma Supreme, yet better is life for a single day seeing Dhamma Supreme. 16. It is better to have a single day in one’s life, which sees the ultimate truth, than to have a hundred years in one’s life, which does not see the ultimate truth. (115)
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
IX Papa
vagga
Evil Evil Evil Evil Evil Evil The Evil The Evil Evil Vice Evil Evil
# 1 116. Hasten to do good; restrain your mind from evil. He who is slow in doing good, his mind delights in evil. 116. Hasten to do good; restrain your mind from evil; for the mind of one who is slow in doing good tends to take delight in doing evil. 116. Haste to do good; thy thoughts from ill restrain;
Sloth in good deeds makes one for evil fain.
116. Make haste in doing good and restrain the mind from evil; if one is slow in doing good, the mind finds delight in evil. Be urgent in good; hold your thoughts off evil. When one is slack in doing good the mind delights in evil. 116 116. If a man would hasten towards the good, he should keep his thought away from evil; if a man does what is good slothfully, his mind delights in evil. (116) You should be quick in doing good. One should restrain mind from evil. The mind of somebody, who is slow in doing good, delights in evil. Make haste in doing good,
And check your mind from evil
Who is slow in making merit -
His mind delights in evil.
116. Be quick to do what is (morally) beautiful. Restrain the mind from evil. He who is sluggish in doing good, his mind delights in evil. 116. Cling to what is right : so will you keep the mind from wrong. Whoso is slack in well- doing comes to rejoice in evil. Make haste towards the good and check the mind for evil. The one who’s is slow to make merit delights in the evil mind. 1. Make haste in doing good and check your mind from evil. If a man is slow in doing meritorious actions, his mind delights in evil. (116)
# 2 117. Should a person commit evil, let him not do it again and again. Let him not find pleasure therein, for painful is the accumulation of evil. 117. If you do what is evil, do not repeat it or take pleasure in making it a habit. An evil habit will cause nothing but suffering. 117. If thou do ill, cease, and thy sin forgo;
Take not delight therein; ill deeds bring woe.
117. If a man commits evil let him not repeat it again and again; let him not delight in it, for the accumulation of sin brings suffering. If a man has done evil, let him not keep on doing it. Let him not create an inclination to it. The accumulation of evil means suffering. 117 117. If a man commits a sin, let him not do it again; let him not delight in sin: pain is the outcome of evil. (117) Should a person do evil, let him not do it again and again. One should not wish for it. Accumulation of evil is painful. Should a man commit evil,
Let him not do it again and again,
Nor turn his heart to delight therein;
Painful is the heaping-up of evil.
117. Should a man (once) do evil, let him not make a habit of it; let him not set his heart on it. Painful is the heaping up of evil. 117. If one offends, let him not repeat his offence ; let him not set his heart upon it. Sad is the piling up of sin. If one some evil does then do it not again and again. Do not wish for it anew for evil grows to dukkha. 2. Should a man commits evil, he should not do it again and again. He should not find pleasure therein, because accumulation of evil is painful. (117)
# 3 118. Should a person do good, let him do it again and again. let him fin pleasure therein, for blissful is the accumulation of good. 118. If you do what is good, keep repeating it and take pleasure in making it a habit. A good habit will cause nothing but joy. 118. If thou do good, thy life in good employ;
Take thou delight therein; good deeds bring joy.
118. If a man commits a meritorious deed, let him perform it again and again; let him develop a longing for doing good; happiness is the outcome of the accumulation of merit. If a man has done good, let him keep on doing it. Let him create an inclination to it. The accumulation of good means happiness. 118 118. If a man does what is good, let him do it again; let him delight in it: happiness is the outcome of good. (118) Should a person do good, let him do it again and again. One should wish for it. Accumulation of good is pleasant. Should a man perform merit,
Let him do it again and again,
And turn his mind to delight therein;
Blissful is the piling-up of merit.
118. Should a man (once) do good, let him make a habit of it; let him set his heart on it. Happy is the heaping up of good. 118. If one does well, let him repeat his well- doing : let him set his heart upon it. Glad is the storing up of good. If one should some merit make do it again and again. One should wish for it anew for merit grows to joy. 3. Should a man performs a meritorious action, he should do it again and again. He should find pleasure therein because accumulation of merits is blissful. (118)
# 4 119. It may be well with the evil-doer as long as the evil ripens not. But when it does ripen, then the evil-doer sees (the painful results of) his evil deeds. 119. Even though those who are evil may still find happiness as long as they do not reap what they have sown, when they do, sorrow overcomes them. 119. Sinners see bliss while their ill deeds are green;
When the sin ripens, sorrow then is seen.
119. Even the wrongdoer finds some happiness so long as (the fruit of) his misdeed does not mature; but when it does mature, then he sees its evil results. An evil man encounters good so long as his evil behaviour does not bear fruit, but when his evil behaviour bears fruit, then the evil man encounters the evil consequences. 119 119. Even an evil-doer sees happiness as long as his evil deed has not ripened; but when his evil deed has ripened, then does the evil-doer see evil. (119) An evil person may even see goodness [in his evil deeds] as long as the evil has not ripened. When the evil has ripened, then the evil person sees those evil deeds. For the evil-doer all is well,
While the evil ripens not;
But when his evil yields its fruit,
He sees the evil results.
119. As long as it bears no fruit, so long the evildoer sees the evil (he has done) as good. When it bears fruit (in the form of suffering) he recognizes it as evil. 119. The bad man sees good days, until his wrong-doing ripens ; then he beholds evil days. As long as evil ripens not even the evil one goodness knows, but when the evil ripens then the person evil knows. 4. Even one who is evil sees good as long as the evil has not developed, but when the evil has developed, one sees the evil results. (119)
# 5 120. It may be ill with the doer of good as long as the good ripens not. But when it does ripen, then the doer of good sees (the pleasant results of) his good deeds. 120. Even though those who are good may still encounter suffering as long as they do not reap what they have sown, when they do, joy overcomes them. 120. Good men see ill while their good deeds are green;
When the good ripens, happiness is seen.
120. Even the doer of good deeds knows evil (days) so long as his merit has not matured; but when his merit has fully matured, then he sees the happy results of his meritorious deeds. An good man encounters evil so long as his good behaviour does not bear fruit, but when his good behaviour bears fruit, then the good man encounters the good consequences. 120 120. Even a good man sees evil days, as long as his good deed has not ripened; but when his good deed has ripened, then does the good man see happy days. (120) A good person may even see evil [in his good deeds] as long as the goodness has not ripened. When the goodness has ripened, then the good person sees those good deeds. For the good man, perhaps, all is ill
While as yet his good is not ripe;
But when it bears its fruit,
He sees the good results.
120. As long as it bears no fruit, so long the good man sees (the good he has done) as evil. When it bears fruit (in the form of happiness), then he recognizes it as good. 120. Even a good man may see evil days till his well-doing comes to fruition ; then he beholds good days. As long as goodness ripens not even the good one evil knows, but when the goodness ripens then that person knows the good. 5. Even one who is good sees evil as long as the good has not developed, but when the good has developed, one sees the good results. (120)
# 6 121. Think not lightly of evil, saying, "It will not come to me." Drop by drop is the water pot filled. Likewise, the fool, gathering it little by little, fills himself with evil. 121. No one should think lightly of evil, imagining: “Sorrow will not come to me.” Little by little, a person will be filled with evil, as a pot is filled by drops of water. 121. Think not of ill: "It cannot be my fate";
As drop by drop the water fills the pot,
So slowly good men good accumulate.
121. Do not think lightly of evil, saying, "It will not come to me." By the constant fall of waterdrops, a pitcher is filled; likewise the unwise person, accumulating evil little by little, becomes full of evil. Do not think lightly of evil that not the least consequence will come of it. A whole waterpot will fill up from dripping drops of water. A fool fills himself with evil, just a little at a time. 121 121. Let no man think lightly of evil, saying in his heart, It will not come nigh unto me. Even by the falling of water-drops a water-pot is filled; the fool becomes full of evil, even if he gather it little by little. (121) Do not disregard evil, "It will not come to me!" Falling drops of water can fill up even a water jar. The fool fills himself up with evil, even if collecting it just little by little. Despise not evil,
Saying it will not come to me'
Drop by drop, is the water pot filled,
Likewise the fool, gathering little by little,
Fills himself with evil.
121. Do not underestimate evil, (thinking) ‘It will not approach me.’ A water- pot becomes full by the (constant) falling of drops of water. (Similarly) the spiritually immature person little by little fills himself with evil. 121. Think not lightly of evil "It will not come nigh me." Drop by drop the pitcher is filled : slowly yet surely the fool is saturated with evil. Think lightly not of evil, ‘It will not come to me’, for by the falling of water drops a water jar is filled. The fool with evil fills himself, he soaks up little by little. 6. Do not disregard evil, saying "It will not come close to me". The falling of drops of water will in time fill a water jar. Even so the fool fills himself with evil by gathering it little by little. (121)
# 7 122. Think not lightly of good, saying, "It will not come to me." Drop by drop is the water pot filled. Likewise, the wise man, gathering it little by little, fills himself with good. 122. No one should think lightly of good, imagining: “Joy will not come to me.” Little by little, a person will be filled with merit, as a pot is filled by drops of water. 122. Think not of good: "It cannot be my fate";
As drop by drop the water fills the pot,
So slowly bad men woes accumulate.
122. Do not think lightly of merit, saying, "It will not come to me." By the constant fall of waterdrops, a pitcher is filled; likewise the wise person, accumulating merit little by little, becomes full of merit. Do not think lightly of good that not the least consequence will come of it. A whole waterpot will fill up from dripping drops of water. A wise man fills himself with good, just a little at a time. 122 122. Let no man think lightly of good, saying in his heart, It will not come nigh unto me. Even by the falling of water-drops a water-pot is filled; the wise man becomes full of good, even if he gather it little by little. (122) Do not disregard goodness, "It will not come to me!" Falling drops of water can fill up even a water jar. The clever one fills himself up with goodness, even if collecting it just little by little. Despise not merit,
Saying It will not come to me'
Drop by drop, is the water pot filled,
Likewise the wise, gathering little by little,
Fills himself with merit.
122. Do not underestimate good, (thinking) ‘It will not approach me.’ A water- pot becomes full by the (constant) falling of drops of water. (Similarly) the wise man little by little fills himself with good. 122. Think not lightly of good "It will not come nigh me." Drop by drop the pitcher is filled : slowly yet surely the good are filled with merit. Think lightly not of goodness, ‘It will not come to me’, for by the falling of water drops a water jar is filled. The sage with goodness fills himself, he soaks up little by little. 7. Do not disregard merit, saying "It will not come close to me". The falling of drops of water will in time fill a water jar. Even so the wise man fills himself with good by gathering it little by little. (122)
# 8 123. Just as a trader with a small escort and great wealth would avoid a perilous route, or just as one desiring to live avoids poison, even so should one shun evil. 123. As a rich merchant traveling alone avoids dangerous roads, as one who loves life avoids poison, let everyone avoid evil deeds. 123. Just as the lord of some rich caravan,
Whose guard is scanty, fears the highwayman;
As one who loves his life must poison shun,
Be wise and guard 'gainst evil deeds begun.
123. As a merchant who has limited escort, yet carries much wealth, avoids a perilous road, as a man who is desirous of living long avoids poison, so in the same way should the wise shun evil. One should avoid evil like a merchant with much goods and only a small escort avoids a dangerous road, and like a man who loves life avoids poison. 123 123. Let a man avoid evil deeds, as a merchant, if he has few companions and carries much wealth, avoids a dangerous road; as a man who loves life avoids poison. (123) Like a merchant with a small caravan and a lot of money would avoid a dreadful path, like someone who wants to live would avoid a poison, so should one avoid evil. Evoids a dangerous path,
Just as one who loves life avoids poison,
Even so should one shun evil.
123. As a merchant (travelling) with a small caravan and much wealth avoids a dangerous road, or as one desirous of life shuns poison, so should one keep clear of evil. 123. A trader whose pack is great and whose caravan is small shuns a dangerous road ; a man who loves his life shuns poison : so do thou shun evil. As merchant on a perilous path, great wealth having little guard, as life-loving man with poison so with evil heedful be. 8. Just as a merchant, with a small escort but great wealth, avoids a dangerous route, let a man who desires to live avoid drinking poison and the dangers of evil. (123)
# 9 124. If on the hand there is no wound, one may carry even poison in it. Poison does not affect one who is free from wounds. For him who does no evil, there is no ill. 124. If you have no wound on your hand, you can touch poison without being harmed. No harm comes to those who do no harm. 124. Thou mayest poison handle if thy palm
Contain no wound; whole skin no poison fears;
There is no ill for him that doth no harm.
124. If one does not have a wound in his hand, he may carry poison in his palm. Poison does not affect him who has no wound. There is no ill effect for the person who does no wrong. If there is no wound on one's hand, one can handle poison. Poison has no effect where there is no wound. There is no evil for the non-doer. 124 124. He who has no wound on his hand, may touch poison with his hand; poison does not affect one who has no wound; nor is there evil for one who does not commit evil. (124) If there is no wound in the palm, one can carry poison with it. The poison does not affect one who is without a wound. There is no evil for one, who is not doing it. If no wound there be in the hand,
One may handle poison;
Poison does not effect one who has no wound;
There is no ill for him who does no wrong.
124. If one has no wound in one’s hand one may (safely) handle poison. The unwounded hand is not affected by poison. (Similarly) no evil befalls him who does no wrong. 124. He who has no wound can handle poison : the unwounded hand cannot absorb it. There is no evil to him that does no evil. If in the hand’s no wound poison one may bear. A woundless one is poisoned not, non-doers have no evil. 9. If there is no wound in one’s hand, one may carry poison in it. Poison does not affect one who has no wound. There is no evil for one who does none. (124)
# 10 125. Like fine dust thrown against the wind, evil falls back upon that fool who offends an inoffensive, pure and guiltless man. 125. If you harm a person who should not be harmed, one who is pure and free from moral defilements, you harm yourself, as dust thrown against the wind comes back to the thrower. 125. Who on a harmless creature worketh pain,
In whom no fault, in whom no ill is found,
Upon that fool his evil deeds rebound
As fine dust cast i' the wind falls back again.
125. Whoever offends an innocent, pure and faultless person, the evil (of his act) rebounds on that fool, even as fine dust thrown against the wind. Whoever does harm to an innocent man, a pure man and a faultless one, the evil comes back on that fool, like fine dust thrown into the wind. 125 125. If a man offend a harmless, pure, and innocent person, the evil falls back upon that fool, like light dust thrown up against the wind. (125) Who offends against an uncorrupted man, against a trusting and pure person, the evil will fall back upon such a fool, like minute dust thrown against the wind. Whosoever offends a harmless person,
One pure and guiltless,
Upon that very fool the evil recoils
Even as fine dust thrown against the wind.
125. Whoever offends against an innocent man, one who is pure and faultless, to that spiritually immature person the evil (he has committed) comes back like fine dust thrown against the wind. 125. Whoso is offended by the inoffensive man, and whoso blames an innocent man, his evil returns upon him as fine dust thrown against the wind. Who offends the inoffensive, the innocent and blameless one, upon that fool does evil fall as fine dust flung against the wind. 10. If anyone offends an innocent person, the evil of that will come back to that fool, like fine dust thrown against the wind. (125)
# 11 126. Some are born in the womb; the wicked are born in hell; the devout go to heaven; the stainless pass into Nibbana. 126. Some are born again as human beings. Those caught in evil ways go to a state of intense suffering; those who have done good go to a state of joy; but those who are free from moral intoxicants realize nibbāna. 126. Some men by birth a life on earth attain;
The wicked go to hell, the good to heaven;
But holy saints are never born again.
126. (After death), some are reborn in the womb; evildoers are born in hell; those who commit meritorious deeds go to heaven; and those who are free from worldly desires realize nirvana. Some are reborn in a human womb, evil-doers go to hell, the good go to heaven, and those without inflowing thoughts achieve final liberation. 126 126. Some people are born again; evil-doers go to hell; righteous people go to heaven; those who are free from all worldly desires attain Nirvana. (126) Some are born in the womb; evildoers arise in hell; righteous ones go to heaven; those without taints are completely emancipated. Some are born in the womb again,
The evil-doers in Hell;
The good go to Heaven;
The undefiled ones attain Nibbana.
126. Some (beings) arise (by way of conception) in the womb. Evildoers are born in a state of woe. Those who do good go to heaven. Those who are free from defilements become utterly ‘Cool’. 126. Some go to the womb ; some, evil-doers, to hell ; the good go to heaven ; the sinless to Nirvana. Some find birth within a womb, evil-doer quicken in hell, good-farers to the heavens go, the Unpolluted wholly cool. 11. Some are born in a womb. Those who are evil are born in evil realms. People whose conduct is good go to heaven. People who are free from defilement enter Nirvana. (126)
# 12 127. Neither in the sky nor in mid-ocean, nor by entering into mountain clefts, nowhere in the world is there a place where one may escape from the results of evil deeds. 127. Not in the sky, nor in the middle of the ocean, nor in mountain canyons, nor anywhere else in the world is there a place where one can escape from the consequences of one’s evil deeds. 127. Not in the air nor middle of the sea,
Nor entering a mountain cave to hide,
Nor anywhere on earth can'st thou abide
Where from thy ill deeds thou can'st set thee free.
127. Not in the sky, not in the middle of the ocean, not even in the cave of a mountain, should one seek refuge, for there exists no place in the world where one can escape the effects of wrongdoing. Not in the sky, nor in the depths of the sea, nor hiding in the cleft of the rocks, there is no place on earth where one can take one's stand to escape from an evil deed. 127 127. Not in the sky, not in the midst of the sea, not if we enter into the clefts of the mountains, is there known a spot in the whole world where a man might be freed from an evil deed. (127) Not in the air, not in the middle of the ocean, not entering the hole in the mountains. There is no place in the world, where being one would be released from the [consequences of] evil deeds. Neither in the sky nor in mid-ocean,
Nor in the clefts of the rocks,
Nowhere in the world is a place to be found
Where abiding one may escape from
(the consequences of) an evil deed.
127. Not in the sky, nor in the midst of the sea, nor yet in the clefts of the mountains, nowhere in the world (in fact) is there any place to be found where, having entered, one can abide free from (the consequences of) one’s evil deeds. 127. Not in the sky, nor in mid-ocean, nor in mountain-cave can one find sanctuary from his sins. Neither in sky nor surrounding by sea, nor by dwelling in a mountain cave, nowhere is found that place in earth where one’s from evil kamma free. 12. There is nowhere on earth — not in the sky, nor in the sea, nor in a mountain cave, that one may escape from the effects of one’s evil deed. (127)
# 13 128. Neither in the sky nor in mid-ocean, nor by entering into mountain clefts, nowhere in the world is there a place where one may will not be overcome by death. 128. Not in the sky, nor in the ocean, nor in mountain canyons, nor anywhere else in the world is there a place where one can hide from death. 128. Not in the air nor middle of the sea,
Nor entering a mountain cave to hide,
Nor anywhere on earth can'st thou abide
Where death shall not pursue and conquer thee.
128. Not in the sky, not in the middle of the ocean, not even in the cave of a mountain, should one seek refuge, for there exists no place in the world where one will not be overpowered by death. Not in the sky, nor in the depths of the sea, nor hiding in the cleft of the rocks, there is no place on earth where one can take one's stand to not be overcome by death. 128 128. Not in the sky, not in the midst of the sea, not if we enter into the clefts of the mountains, is there known a spot in the whole world where death could not overcome (the mortal). (128) Not in the air, not in the middle of the ocean, not entering the hole in the mountains. There is no place in the world, where being, one would not be overcome by death. Neither in the sky nor in mid-ocean,
Nor in the clefts of the rocks,
Nowhere in the world is found that place
Where abiding one will not be overcome by death.
128. Not in the sky, nor in the midst of the sea, nor yet in the clefts of mountains, nowhere in the world (in fact) is there any place to be found where, having entered, one will not be overcome by death. 128. Not in the sky, not in mid-ocean, not in mountain-cave can one find release from the conquering might of death. Neither in sky nor surrounding by sea, nor by dwelling in a mountain cave, nowhere is found that place in earth where one’s by death not overcome. 13. There is nowhere on earth — not in the sky, nor in the sea, nor in a mountain cave, that one will not be overcome by death. (128)
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
X Danda
vagga
Violence Punishment Punishment The Rod of Punishment Punishment The Punishment The Punishment Punishment Punishment Punishment Punishment Punishment
# 1 129. All tremble at violence; all fear death. Putting oneself in the place of another, one should not kill nor cause another to kill. 129. Everyone fears punishment; everyone fears death, just as you do. Therefore, do not kill or cause to kill. 129. All beings fear the rod, all fear to die;
Regard them as thyself; strike not nor slay.
129. All tremble before the rod of punishment; all fear death; likening others to oneself, one should neither slay nor cause to slay. All fear violence, all are afraid of death. Seeing the similarity to oneself, one should not use violence or have it used. 129 129. All men tremble at punishment, all men fear death; remember that you are like unto them, and do not kill, nor cause slaughter. (129) Everybody trembles at punishment; everybody fears death. Having made the comparison with oneself, let one not kill, nor cause another to kill. All tremble at punishment;
All fear death;
Comparing others with oneself,
One should neither kill nor cause to kill.
129. All (living beings) are terrified of punishment (danda); all fear death. Making comparison (of others) with oneself, one should neither kill nor cause to kill. 129. All fear the rod, all quake at death. Judge then by thyself, and forbear from slaughter, or from causing to slay. All tremble at force, of death are all afraid. Likening others to oneself kill not nor cause to kill. 1. All tremble at the rod. All fear death. Comparing others with oneself, one should neither kill nor cause to kill. (129)
# 2 130. All tremble at violence; life is dear to all. Putting oneself in the place of another, one should not kill nor cause another to kill. 130. Everyone fears punishment; everyone loves life, just as you do. Therefore, do not kill or cause to kill. 130. All beings fear the rod; all love their life;
Regard them as thyself; strike not nor slay.
130. All tremble before the rod of punishment; for all life is dear; likening others to oneself, one should neither slay nor cause to slay. All fear violence, life is dear to all. Seeing the similarity to oneself, one should not use violence or have it used. 130 130. All men tremble at punishment, all men love life; remember that thou art like unto them, and do not kill, nor cause slaughter. (130) Everybody trembles at punishment; life is dear to everybody. Having made the comparison with oneself, let one not kill, nor cause another to kill. All tremble at punishment;
To all life is dear;
Comparing others with oneself,
One should neither kill nor cause to kill.
130. All (living beings) are terrified of punishment (danda); to all, life is dear. Making comparison (of others) with oneself, one should neither kill nor cause to kill. 130. To all is life dear. Judge then by thyself, and forbear to slay or to cause slaughter. All tremble at force, dear is life to all. Likening others to oneself kill not nor cause to kill. 2. All tremble at the rod. Life is dear to all. Comparing others with oneself, one should neither kill nor cause to kill. (130)
# 3 131. One who, while himself seeking happiness, oppresses with violence other beings who also desire happiness, will not attain happiness hereafter. 131. If, hoping to be happy, you strike at others who are also seeking happiness, you will be happy neither here nor hereafter. 131. Whoso treats pleasure-loving creatures ill,
When he seeks bliss for self he shall not find it.
131. He who, desirous of happiness for himself, torments with a rod others who are likewise seeking enjoyment, shall not obtain happiness in the hereafter. He who does violence to creatures seeking happiness like himself does not find happiness after death. 131 131. He who seeking his own happiness punishes or kills beings who also long for happiness, will not find happiness after death. (131) Who hurts with a stick beings that desire happiness, searching for happiness himself, he will not reach happiness after death. Whoso, himself seeking happiness,
Harms with rod pleasure loving beings -
He gets no happiness hereafter.
131. Whoever torments with the stick (danda) creatures desirous of happiness, he himself thereafter, seeking happiness, will not obtain happiness. 131. Whoso himself desires joy, yet hurts them who love joy, shall not obtain it hereafter. Whoever harms with force those desiring happiness, as seeker after happiness one gains no future joy. 3. Whoever, seeking his own happiness, hurts with the rod other living beings who all want happiness will not experience happiness hereafter. (131)
# 4 132. One who, while himself seeking happiness, does not oppress with violence other beings who also desire happiness, will find happiness hereafter. 132. If, hoping to be happy, you do not strike at others who are also seeking happiness, you will be happy here and hereafter. 132. Whoso treats pleasure-loving creatures well,
When he seeks happiness for self shall find it.
132. He who, desirous of happiness for himself, does not torment others who likewise long for happiness, shall obtain happiness in the hereafter. He who does no violence to creatures seeking happiness like himself does find happiness after death. 132 132. He who seeking his own happiness does not punish or kill beings who also long for happiness, will find happiness after death. (132) Who does not hurt with a stick beings that desire happiness, searching for happiness himself, he will reach happiness after death. Whoso, himself seeking happiness,
Harms not with rod pleasure loving beings -
He gets happiness hereafter.
132. Whoever does not torment with the stick (danda) creatures desirous of happiness, he himself thereafter, seeking happiness, will obtain happiness. 132. Whoso himself desires joy and hurts not them who love it, shall hereafter attain to joy. Whoever doesn’t harms with force those desiring happiness, as seeker after happiness one gains future joy. 4. Whoever, seeking his own happiness, does not hurt other living beings who all want happiness will experience happiness hereafter. (132)
# 5 133. Speak not harshly to anyone, for those thus spoken to might retort. Indeed, angry speech hurts, and retaliation may overtake you. 133. Speak quietly to everyone, and they too will be gentle in their speech. Harsh words hurt and come back to the speaker. 133. Use not harsh speech; when harshly spoken to
Men may retort; painful are quarrellings,
And punishment may follow thy harsh words.
133. Do not speak harshly to anyone; those thus spoken to will retaliate in kind; discordant indeed will be the response, and soon retribution will overtake you. Don't speak harshly to anyone. If you do people will speak to you in the same way. Harsh words are painful and their retaliation will hurt you. 133 133. Do not speak harshly to anybody; those who are spoken to will answer thee in the same way. Angry speech is painful, blows for blows will touch thee. (133) Do not say anything harsh, those spoken to might reply to that. Angry talk is painful, retribution might be attached to it. Speak not harshly to anyone.
Those thus addressed will retort.
Painful indeed is vindictive speech.
Blows in exchange may bruise you./td>
133. Do not speak roughly to anyone: those thus spoken to will answer back. Painful indeed is angry talk, (as a result of which) one will experience retribution. 133. Speak not harshly to any one : else will men turn upon you. Sad are the words of strife : retribution will follow them. Speak not harshly to other folk, speaking so, they may retort. Dukkha indeed is quarrelsome speech and force for force may hurt you. 5. Do not speak harsh words, because once spoken will retort to you. Angry words are painful. There may be blows for blows that cause retaliation. (133)
# 6 134. If, like a broken gong, you silence yourself, you have approached Nibbana, for vindictiveness is no longer in you. 134. If you can keep your mind calm and quiet, like a broken gong which is no longer resonant, you are sure to realize nibbāna, leaving all harsh speech behind you. 134. If thou can'st keep thy tongue from wagging oft,
Silent as some cracked gong, thou hast thereby
Nibbāna won; no brawling is in thee.
134. If you can make yourself as silent as a shattered bronze gong, then you have attained to the peace of nirvana, for now there is no discord in you. If you don't disturb yourself, like a broken gong does not vibrate, then you have achieved nirvana. Irritability no longer exists for you. 134 134. If, like a shattered metal plate (gong), thou utter not, then thou hast reached Nirvana; contention is not known to thee. (134) If you yourself do not vibrate, just like a broken gong, then you have reached Nirvana. Anger does not exist for you. If you silence yourself as a broken gong,
You have already attained Nibbana.
No contention will be found in you.
134. If you (can) silence yourself like a shattered metal plate you have already attained Nirvana: no anger is found in you. 134. Be silent as a broken gong : so wilt thou reach peace ; for strife is not found in thee. If like a broken gong never you reverberate, quarreling’s not part of you, that Nibbana’s reached. 6. If you keep silence like a broken gong, you have already attained Nirvana. No vindictiveness will be found in you. (134)
# 7 135. Just as a cowherd drives the cattle to pasture with a staff, so do old age and death drive the life force of beings (from existence to existence). 135. As, with a staff, a cowherd drives cattle to fresh pastures, so also, old age and death drive the life of all beings. 135. As with a stick the herdsman drives his kine,
So death and age compel the lives of men.
135. As a cowherd with his rod drives cattle to the pasture, so do old age and death drive the lives of sentient beings. Like a cowherd driving cows off to the fields, so old age and death take away the years from the living. 135 135. As a cowherd with his staff drives his cows into the stable, so do Age and Death drive the life of men. (135) Just like a cowherd drives cows to pasture with a stick, so old age and death drive the life of living beings. As with a staff the cowherd drives
His cattle out to pasture-ground,
So do old age and death compel
The life of beings (all around).
135. As a cowherd drives cows out to pasture with a stick, so do old age and death drive the life out of living beings. 135. As the herdsman drives out his cows to the pasture, so Old Age and Death drive out the life of men. As with force the cowherds drive their cattle out to graze, like this decay and death drive out the life from all beings. 7. As a cowherd drives his cattle to pasture with a rod, even so do old age and death drive out the lives of beings. (135)
# 8 136. When the fool commits evil deeds, he does not realize (their evil nature). The witless man is tormented by his own deeds, like one burnt by fire. 136. While they are performing evil deeds, the immature do not know what is in store for them. They will suffer for their evil deeds, like one who is burned by fire. 136. The fool in doing ill knows not his folly;
His own deeds, like a fire, the fool consume.
136. When a person ignorant (of the Dhamma) commits evil deeds, he does not realize their nature. The stupid man burns (suffers) through these deeds as if consumed by fire. Even when he is doing evil, the fool does not realise it. The idiot is punished by his own deeds, like one is scorched by fire. 136 136. A fool does not know when he commits his evil deeds: but the wicked man burns by his own deeds, as if burnt by fire. (136) A fool does not realize when he is committing bad deeds. The stupid person is tormented by his own deeds just as if burned by fire. When a fool does wicked deeds,
He does not know their future fruit.
The witless one is tormented by his own deeds.
136. A spiritually immature person performs evil deeds not realizing (their true nature). By his own actions is the man of evil understanding tormented (lit. burned) as though consumed by fire. 136. Verily the fool sins and knows it not : by his own deeds is the fool tormented as by fire. When the fool does evil deeds their end he does not know, such kamma burns the one unwise as one who’s scorched by fire. 8. When a fool commits evil deeds; he does not realize that he is tormented by his own deeds, like one burnt by fire. (136)
# 9 137. He who inflicts violence on those who are unarmed, and offends those who are inoffensive, will soon come upon one of these ten states: 137—140. If one harms those who are innocent and who should not be harmed, suffering will come in one of these ten ways: they may suffer severe pain, or poverty, or injury to the body (such as, for example, loss of limbs), or serious illness (such as, for example, leprosy), or insanity, or misfortunes, or wrongful or serious accusations,or loss of relatives, or loss of wealth, or the burning down of their house by fire or lightning, and, after death, they will be reborn in a place of continuous suffering. 137. He who offends the harmless innocent
Soon reaches one of these ten states of woe;
137. He who inflicts punishment upon those who do not deserve it, and hurts those who are harmless, such a person will soon come to face one of these ten states: He who does violence to the peaceful and harmless soon encounters one of ten things -- He may experience cruel pain, disaster, physical injury, severe illness, or insanity, or else trouble with the authorities, grave accusation, bereavement, or loss of property, or else destruction of his house by fire, and on the death of his body the fool goes to hell. 137, 138, 139, 140 137. He who inflicts pain on innocent and harmless persons, will soon come to one of these ten states: (137) Who offends with a stick somebody who is uncorrupted and without violence, he will quickly go to one of the ten states: [continued in 138] He who inflicts punishment on those
Who are harmless and who offend no one
Speedily comes to one of these ten states:
137. Whoever inflicts punishment on the innocent, (or) who offends against the unoffending, he speedily falls into one of the ten states: 137. He who strikes those who strike not and are innocent will come speedily to one of these ten states : Whoever forces the forceless or offends the inoffensive, speedily comes indeed to one of these ten states: 9-12. Whoever hurts with his rod those who are harmless, will soon come to one of these ten states: acute pain disaster, body injury, grievous sickness, loss of mind, oppression by the king, heavy accusation, lose of relatives, destruction of wealth, ravaging fire that will burn his house, to be born in hell when his body dissolves. (137-140)
# 10 138-140 Sharp pain, or disaster, bodily injury, serious illness, or derangement of mind, trouble from the government, or grave charges, loss of relatives, or loss of wealth, or houses destroyed by ravaging fire; upon dissolution of the body that ignorant man is born in hell. 138. Sharp pain, disease, or bodily decay,
Grievous disaster, or a mind distraught;
138,139,140. He may soon come to terrible pain, great deprivations, physical injury, deep-rooted ailment or mental disorder, the wrath of the monarch or a dreadful accusation, loss of relatives, the complete destruction of wealth, or a sudden fire may break out and burn his houses. After the dissolution of his physical body, he will surely be born in hell. 138. He will have cruel suffering, loss, injury of the body, heavy affliction, or loss of mind, (138) [continued from 137] He would get harsh pain, loss of property, and bodily injury, serious illness, or derangement of mind. [continued in 139] To grievous bodily pain, to disaster,
To bodily injury, to serious illness,
To loss of mind, will he come.
138. He meets either with intense physical pain, or material loss, or bodily injury, or serious illness, or mental derangement; 138. To cruel torment, loss, accident, severe illness, and madness he will come : Sharp pain or deprivation, or injury to body, or to a serious disease, derangement of the mind;
# 11 139. Oppression by the king, or calumny,
Loss of relations, loss of all his wealth,
139. Or a misfortune coming from the king, or a fearful accusation, or loss of relations, or destruction of treasures, (139) [continued from 138] Or a trouble from the king, and cruel accusations, or loss of relatives, or destruction of wealth. [continued in 140] To oppression by the king,
To grave accusation,
To loss of relatives,
To destruction of wealth, (will he come).
139. Or (he meets with) trouble from the Government or a serious accusation, or bereavement, or loss of wealth: 139. To visitation from the King, grievous slander, loss of kith and kin, and perishing of his wealth he will come : Troubled by the government, or else false accusation, or by loss of relatives, destruction of one’s wealth;
# 12 140. His house burned by a thunderbolt or fire;
At death, poor fool, he finds rebirth in hell.
140. Or lightning-fire will burn his houses; and when his body is destroyed, the fool will go to hell. (140) [continued from 139] Or then a blazing fire will burn his houses. And after death this fool will be reborn in hell. Or his house will be burnt up with fire,
And that unwise one will pass to
Hell in the world to come.
140. Or else his houses are consumed by fire, (while) on the dissolution of the body that man of evil understanding is reborn in a state of woe. 140. Ravaging fire will destroy his houses, and after death the poor wretch will go to hell. Or one’s houses burn on raging conflagration, at the body’s end, in hell arises that unwise one.
# 13 141. Neither going about naked, nor matted locks, nor filth, nor fasting, nor lying on the ground, nor smearing oneself with ashes and dust, nor sitting on the heels (in penance) can purify a mortal who has not overcome doubt. 141. Not by going about naked, nor by having matted hair, nor by smearing oneself with mud, nor by fasting, nor by sleeping on the ground, nor by covering oneself with dust, nor by sitting motionless — no amount of penance can purify a person who has not overcome doubt. 141. Not nakedness, nor matted hair nor filth,
Not fasting long, nor lying on the ground,
Not dust and dirt, nor squatting on the heels.
Can cleanse the mortal that is full of doubt.
141. Neither nakedness, nor matted locks; neither applying mud (all over the body), nor fasting, nor lying on the bare earth; neither besmearing oneself with soot, nor squatting on one's heels, can purify a man who has not got rid of his doubts. Neither naked asceticism, matted hair, dirt, fasting, sleeping on the ground, dust and mud, nor prolonged sitting on one's heels can purify a man who is not free of doubts. 141 141. Not nakedness, not platted hair, not dirt, not fasting, or lying on the earth, not rubbing with dust, not sitting motionless, can purify a mortal who has not overcome desires. (141) Not wandering around naked, not matted hair, not mud on the body, not fasting, nor lying on the bare ground, dust and sweat, sitting on one's heels - nothing can purify a mortal who has not overcome his doubts. /td> Not nakedness, nor matted hair,
Nor dirt, nor fasting,
Nor lying on the ground,
Nor besmearing oneself with ashes,
Nor squatting on the heels,
Can purify a mortal
Who has not overcome doubts.
141. Not going about naked, not (the wearing of) matted locks, not abstention from food, not sleeping on the (bare) ground, not (smearing the body with) dust and ashes, nor yet (the practice of) squatting (on the balls of the feet), can purify a mortal who has not overcome his doubts. 141. Not nakedness, nor matted hair, not dirt, nor fastings, not sleeping in sanctuaries, nor ashes, nor ascetic posture none of these things purifies a man who is not free from doubt. Not going naked, nor matted hair, nor filth, nor fasting, not sleeping on bare earth, no penance on heels, nor sweat nor grime can purify a mortal still overcome by doubt. 13. Neither nakedness, nor matted hair, nor filth, nor fasting, nor lying on the ground, nor dust and dirt, nor striving squatting on the heels, can purify a mortal who has not overcome doubts and desires. (141)
# 14 142. Even though he be well-attired, yet if he is posed, calm, controlled and established in the holy life, having set aside violence towards all beings -- he, truly, is a holy man, a renunciate, a monk. 142. But those whose mind is serene, who are free from moral defilements, who have their senses controlled, who are established in Path Insight, who are perfectly pure, and who have laid aside violence towards all beings — these are true brāhmaṇas, true ascetics, true monks, even if they wear fine clothes. 142. But one that lives a calm and tranquil life,
Though gaily decked, if tamed, restrained, he live
Walking the holy path in righteousness,
Laying aside all harm to living things,
True mendicant, ascetic, Brāhmin he!
142. Even though a person be dressed in fine clothes, if he develops tranquillity, is quiet, self-disciplined, resolute and practices celibacy, and abstains from injuring all other beings, he is indeed a Brahman, an ascetic and a monk. Even if richly dressed, when a man behaves even-mindedly and is at peace, restrained and established in the right way, chaste and renouncing violence to all forms of life, then he is a brahmin, he is a holy man, he is a bhikkhu (true Buddhist monk). 142 142. He who, though dressed in fine apparel, exercises tranquillity, is quiet, subdued, restrained, chaste, and has ceased to find fault with all other beings, he indeed is a Brahmana, an ascetic (sramana), a friar (bhikshu). (142) Even if one would walk around like an adorned man, [but he would be] peaceful, self-controlled, restrained and pure, having given up punishing of all living beings, he is a Brahmin, he is a recluse, he is a monk. In whatever he be decked,
If yet he cultivates tranquility of mind,
Is calm, controlled, certain and chaste,
And has ceased to injure all other beings,
He is indeed, a brahman, a samana, a bhikkhu.
142. If one who is richly adorned lives in tranquillity, is calm, controlled, assured (of eventual enlightenment), and devotes himself to the spiritual life, laying down the stick with regard to all living beings, then (despite his being richly adorned), he is a brahmana, he is an asketic, he is an almsman. 142. If even a fop fosters the serene mind, calm and controlled, pious and pure, and does no hurt to any living thing, he is the Brahmin he is the Samana, he is the Bhikkhu. Even though adorned, if living in peace calm, tamed, established in the holy life, for beings all laying force aside: one pure, one peaceful, a bhikkhu is he. 14. Though a man may wear fine clothing, if he lives peacefully, subdues his passion, control his senses, has faith, is perfectly pure, lays aside the rod towards all living beings, he is a Brahman, an ascetic, a monk called Bhikkhu. (142)
# 15 143. Only rarely is there a man in this world who, restrained by modesty, avoids reproach, as a thoroughbred horse avoids the whip. 143. It is rare to find in this world those who, out of a sense of shame, refrain from doing evil and who have trained their minds. As a well-trained horse needs no whip, a well-trained mind needs no prodding to be good. 143. Who in this world is so restrained by shame
That, like a thoroughbred flicked by the whip.
He can think lightly of the lash of blame?
143. Is there any man in this world so self-restrained through modesty that he avoids censure as a self-respecting horse avoids the whip? Where is that man in the world who is so restrained by shame that he avoids laziness like a thoroughbred horse avoids the whip? 143 143. Is there in this world any man so restrained by humility that he does not mind reproof, as a well-trained horse the whip? (143) In this world, does there exist a person restrained by conscience, who avoids blame, like a good horse avoids a whip? Rarely is found in this world
Anyone who is restrained by shame and wide-awake
As a thorough-bred horse avoids the whip.
143. In the (whole) world is there a man to be found who, restrained by a sense of shame, avoids censure as a good horse avoids the whip? 143. Is there in all the world a man so modest that he provokes no blame, as a noble steed never deserves the whip ? As a noble steed stung by the whip, be ye spirited and swift. Where in the world is found one restrained by shame, awakened out of sleep as splendid horse with whip? 15. It is rare to find anyone in this world restrained by modesty, who avoids reproach, just as a good horse needs no whipping. (143)
# 16 144. Like a thoroughbred horse touched by the whip, be strenuous, be filled with spiritual yearning. By faith and moral purity, by effort and meditation, by investigation of the truth, by being rich in knowledge and virtue, and by being mindful, destroy this unlimited suffering. 144. Like a well-trained horse, touched by the whip, be diligent and zealous. Through confidence, virtue, effort, concentration, and investigation of the Truth, be endowed with knowledge and firm in the practice of morality; with mindfulness, leave this great misery behind. 144. By faith and virtue, energy, and mind
In perfect balance, searching of the Norm,
Perfect in knowledge and good practices,
Perfect in concentration of your thoughts,
Ye shall strike off this multitude of woes.
144. As a well-trained horse when touched by the whip, even so be you strenuous and eager. By devotion, virtue, effort, concentration, and by the critical investigation of truth (dhamma) may you abandon this great suffering (of samsara), perfect in wisdom, conduct and awareness. Like a thoroughbred horse touched by the whip, be strenuous and determined. Then you will be able to rid yourself of this great suffering by means of faith, morality, energetic behaviour, stillness of mind and reflection on the teaching, after you have become full of wisdom, good habits and recollection. 144 144. Like a well-trained horse when touched by the whip, be ye active and lively, and by faith, by virtue, by energy, by meditation, by discernment of the law you will overcome this great pain (of reproof), perfect in knowledge and in behaviour, and never forgetful. (144) Be like a good horse when touched by a whip - strenuous and anxious. By faith, virtue, effort and concentration, by investigation of truth, by having knowledge and conduct, by being mindful abandon this big suffering. Even as a thorough-bred horse once touched by the whip,
Becomes agitated and exertes himself greatly,
So be strenuous and filled with religious emotion.
By confidence, virtue, effort and concentration,
By the investigation of the Doctrine,
By being endowed with knowledge and conduct
And by keeping your mind alert,
Will you leave this great suffering behind.
144. Like a good horse touched by the whip, be zealous and stirred by profound religious emotion. By means of faith, upright conduct, energy, concentration (samadhi), and investigation of the Truth, (as well as by being) endowed with (spiritual) knowledge and (righteous) behaviour, and by being mindful, leave this great suffering behind. 144. By faith, by righteousness, by manliness, by meditation, by just judgment, by theory and practice, by mindfulness, leave aside sorrow no slight burden. As splendid horse touched with whip, be ardent, deeply moved, by faith and virtue, effort too, by meditation, Dhamma’s search, by knowledge, kindness, mindfulness; abandon dukkha limitless! 16. Like a good horse, touched by the whip, be strenuous and zealous by faith, by virtue, by effort, by concentration, by studying the truth, by being endowed with knowledge and conduct and by being mindful, one shall get rid of this great suffering. (144)
# 17 145. Irrigators regulate the waters, fletchers straighten arrow shafts, carpenters shape wood, and the good control themselves. 145. As irrigators channel water where they want, as archers make their arrows straight, as carpenters fashion timber, the wise shape their minds. 145. As cultivators guide the water-course,
As fletchers straighten out the arrow-shaft,
As carpenters warp timber to their needs,
So righteous men subdue and train themselves.
145. Irrigators conduct water wherever they wish; fletchers shape the shafts; carpenters work the wood, and wise men discipline themselves. Navies channel water, fletchers fashion arrows, and carpenters work on wood, but the good disciple themselves. 145 145. Well-makers lead the water (wherever they like); fletchers bend the arrow; carpenters bend a log of wood; good people fashion themselves. (145) Irrigators lead water. Arrow-makers bend arrow-shaft. Carpenters bend wood. Virtuous ones master themselves. Irigators lead water;
Fletchers fashion shafts;
Carpenters bend wood;
The good tame themselves.
145. Irrigators draw off the waters; fletchers straighten arrows; carpenters shape wood; righteous men discipline themselves. 145. Engineers control the water, fletchers fashion their shafts, carpenters shape the wood : it is themselves that the pious fashion and control. Irrigators govern water, fletchers fashion shafts, as joiners shape their timber those of good conduct tame themselves. 17. Irrigators guide water in chanelling, the fletchers make the arrows straight in bending, the carpenters control the timber in cutting, the virtuous control themselves. (145)
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
XI Jara
vagga
Old Age Old Age Old Age Old Age Old Age Old Age The Old Age Old Age Decay Old Age Old Age Old Age
# 1 146. When this world is ever ablaze, why this laughter, why this jubilation? Shrouded in darkness, will you not see the light? 146. Why is there laughter, why merriment, when this world is on fire? When you are living in darkness, why do you not look for light? 146. Laugh ye, rejoice ye, when this world is burning?
O wrapped in darkness, will ye not seek light?
146. Why laugh, why be jubilant, when all is constantly burning (with desires)? Should you not seek the light of wisdom when you are enveloped by the darkness of ignorance? What is this laughter, what is this delight, forever burning (with desires) as you are? Enveloped in darkness as you are, will you not look for a lamp? 146 146. How is there laughter, how is there joy, as this world is always burning? Why do you not seek a light, ye who are surrounded by darkness? (146) What laughter? Why joy? When everything is constantly burning? Covered by darkness, you do not seek light? What this laughter, what this joy
When the world is ever on fire?
Shrouded all about by darkness,
Will you not then look for light?
146. What mirth can there be, what pleasure, when all the time (everything) is blazing (with the threefold fire of suffering, impermanence, and insubstantiality)? Covered (though you are) in blind darkness, you do not seek a light! 146. Where is the joy, what the pleasure, whilst all is in flames ? Benighted, would ye not seek a torch ? Why this laughter, why this joy, when it’s ever blazing? Shrouded all about in gloom won’t you look for the light? 1. What is laughter, what is joy, when the world is ever burning? When you are in deep darkness, would you not seek the light? (146)
# 2 147. Behold this body -- a painted image, a mass of heaped up sores, infirm, full of hankering -- of which nothing is lasting or stable! 147. Behold this lovely body, this mass of sores, supported by bones, subject to illness, highly thought of. Indeed, this body is neither permanent nor enduring. 147. Behold this body decked, a mass of sores,
Sickly and swayed by multitudinous thoughts.
Impermanent, unstable, uncomposed!
147. Behold this illusory human image, embellished (by rich attire and jewels), full of corruptions, a structure of bones, liable to constant illness, full of countless hankerings, in which there is nothing permanent or stable. Look at the decorated puppet, a mass of wounds and of composite parts, full of disease and always in need of attention. It has no enduring stability. 147 147. Look at this dressed-up lump, covered with wounds, joined together, sickly, full of many thoughts, which has no strength, no hold! (147) Look at this mind-created image, a compounded heap of sores, diseased, with many plans, which does not have any permanence or stability. Behold this beautiful body,
A mass of sores, a bone-gathering,
Diseased and full of hankerings,
With no lasting, no persisting.
147. Look at this painted doll (i.e., the body), this pretentious mass of sores, wretched and full of cravings (or: much hankered after), nothing of which is stable or lasting! 147. Look at this painted image, wounded and swollen, sickly and full of lust, in which there is no permanence ; See this body beautiful a mass of sores, a congeries, much considered but miserable where nothing’s stable, nothing persists. 2. Consider this beautiful body! It is a mass of sores, diseased, full of imaginations. It is never permanent, for ever changing. (147)
# 3 148. Fully worn out is this body, a nest of disease, and fragile. This foul mass breaks up, for death is the end of life. 148. Quite worn out is this body, a nest for disease, subject to decay. This putrid body will eventually disintegrate; life, indeed, ends with death. 148. Poor worn-out carcase, home of sicknesses,
Fragile, corrupting mass, mere life in death!
148. This frail form is a nest of diseases. It is fragile and putrid. It disintegrates and death is the end of life. This body is worn out with age, a nest of diseases and falling apart. The mass of corruption disintegrates, and death is the end of life. 148 148. This body is wasted, full of sickness, and frail; this heap of corruption breaks to pieces, life indeed ends in death. (148) Decayed is this body, a frail nest of diseases. This foul mass breaks up. Indeed, the life ends in death. Thoroughly worn out is this body -
A net of diseases and very frail.
This heap of corruption breaks to pieces -
For life indeed ends in death.
148. Wasted away is this body, a nest of disease, and perishable. The putrid mass breaks up: death is the end of life. 148. This wasted form is a nest of disease and very frail : it is full of putrid matter and perishes. Death is the end of life. All decrepit is this body, diseases’ nest and frail; this foul mass is broken up for life does end in death. 3. This body is decaying! A nest of diseases, perishable. This putrid mass breaks up. Truly life ends in death. (148)
# 4 149. These dove-colored bones are like gourds that lie scattered about in autumn. Having seen them, how can one seek delight? 149. What pleasure can there be for those who see that their white bones will be cast away, like gourds in the autumn? 149. What joy to look upon these bleached bones,
Like useless gourds in autumn thrown aside!—
149. These dove-grey bones are like unto the gourds thrown away in the autumnal season. What pleasure is there in looking at them? When these grey bones are cast aside like gourds in autumn, what pleasure will there be in looking at them? 149 149. Those white bones, like gourds thrown away in the autumn, what pleasure is there in looking at them? (149) Those gray bones, thrown away like pumpkins in fall. Seeing them, what love can there be? As gourds are cast away in Autumn,
So are these dove-hued bones.
What pleasure is there found
For one who looks at them?
149. When like gourds in autumn these dove-grey bones lie here discarded, what pleasure (can one take) in looking at them? 149. What delight is there for him who sees these grey bones scattered like gourds in autumn ? These dove-hued bones scattered in Fall, like long white gourds, what joy in seeing them? 4. Look at these grey white dried bones, like gourds cast away in autumn. What pleasure is there in looking at them? (149)
# 5 150. This city (body) is built of bones, plastered with flesh and blood; within are decay and death, pride and jealousy. 150. Around the bones is built a house, plastered with flesh and blood, in which dwell pride and scorn, old age and death. 150. A township built of bones and plastered o'er
With flesh and blood, the home and dwelling-place
Of age and death, pride and hypocrisy!
150. Here is a citadel built of bones, plastered with flesh and blood, wherein are concealed decay, death, vanity and deceit. It is a city built of bones, and daubed with flesh and blood, in which old age and death, pride and hypocrisy are the inhabitants. 150 150. After a stronghold has been made of the bones, it is covered with flesh and blood, and there dwell in it old age and death, pride and deceit. (150) There is a city made of bones, plastered with flesh and blood, where there are deposited old age, death, conceit and hypocrisy. Of bones is this city made,
Plastered with flesh and bones.
Herein dwell decay and death,
Pride and detraction.
150. (The body) is a city built of bones and plastered with flesh and blood, (a city) wherein lie concealed decay and death, pride and hypocrisy. 150. Here is a citadel of bones plastered with flesh and blood, and manned by old age and death, self-will and enmity. This city’s made of bones plastered with flesh and blood, within are stored decay and death, besmearing and conceit. 5. This body is made of bones covered with flesh and blood. Herein are stored decay, death, conceit and detraction. (150)
# 6 151. Even gorgeous royal chariots wear out, and indeed this body too wears out. But the Dhamma of the Good does not age; thus the Good make it known to the good. 151. Even the ornamented chariot of a king loses its glitter in the course of time; so, too, the body loses its health and strength. But the Dhamma of the righteous does not grow old with the passage of time. Thus do the righteousreveal it to those ready to listen. 151. Just as a royal chariot gaily decked
Falls to decay, so grows this body old;
But Truth and Norm old age cannot assail,
The holy ones indeed know no decay.
151. The gaily decorated royal chariots wear out. So likewise does this body. But the truth of the righteous does not wear out with age. Thus do the enlightened proclaim it to the wise. Even kings' splendid carriages wear out, and the body is certain bound to grow old, but the Truth found by the saints is not subject to aging. That is what the saints themselves proclaim. 151 151. The brilliant chariots of kings are destroyed, the body also approaches destruction, but the virtue of good people never approaches destruction,--thus do the good say to the good. (151) Beautiful king's chariots wear out. And also the body gets old. But the teaching of the good ones does not get old. The good ones teach it to each other. Splendid royal chariots wear away,
The body too comes to old age.
But the good's teaching knows not decay.
Indeed, the good teach the good in this way.
151. Even the richly decorated royal chariots (in time) wear out; likewise the body also perishes. (But) the Truth (dhamma) of the mindful does not perish, (for) those who are tranquil (santa) speak of it to the well-bred (sabbhi). 151. As even the king's bright chariot grows old, so the body of man also comes to old age. But the law of the holy never ages : the holy teach it to the holy. Even royal chariots rot, the body too does rot, decay, but undecaying’s Dhamma of the Good who to the good declare. 6. Even ornamented royal chariots wear out, so the body reaches old age too. However, the Dharma of good virtues never grows old. Thus, teach the good to those who are good. (151)
# 7 152. The man of little learning grows old like a bull. He grows only in bulk, but, his wisdom does not grow. 152. A man who does not learn from life grows old like an ox; his body grows, but not his wisdom. 152. Just like an ox, the witless man grows old;
His flesh grows, but his wits do not increase.
152. The man of little spiritual learning grows like an ox; his flesh increases, but his wisdom does not. An ignorant man ages like an ox. His flesh may increase, but not his understanding. 152 152. A man who has learnt little, grows old like an ox; his flesh grows, but his knowledge does not grow. (152) The person without learning grows old like an ox. His flesh grows; his wisdom does not. Just as the ox grows old,
So ages he of little learning
His flesh increases,
His wisdom is waning.
152. The man of little learning lives like a stalled ox: his flesh increases but his wisdom does not. 152. The simpleton ages like the ox : his weight increases, but not his wisdom. Just as the ox grows old so this man of little learning: his fleshiness increases, his wisdom doesn’t grow. 7. If a man does not learn, he grows old just like an ox! His muscles grow, but his wisdom does not. (152)
# 8 153. Through many a birth in samsara have I wandered in vain, seeking in the builder of this house (of life). Repeated birth is indeed suffering! 153. I have gone through many rounds of birth and death, seeking, but not finding, the builder of this house. Sorrowful, indeed, is birth and death again and again! 153-4. Thro' many a round of birth and death I ran,
Nor found the builder that I sought. Life's stream
Is birth and death and birth, with sorrow filled.
Now, housebuilder, thou'rt seen! No more shalt build!
Broken are all thy rafters, split thy beam!
All that made up this mortal self is gone;
Mind hath slain craving; I have crossed the stream!
153. For countless births have I passed through this cycle of births and deaths, seeking the builder of this tabernacle, but in vain. Sorrowful indeed is this cyclic repetition of births. I have passed in ignorance through a cycle of many rebirths, seeking the builder of the house. Continuous rebirth is a painful thing. But now, housebuilder, I have found you out. You will not build me a house again. All your rafters are broken, your ridge-pole shattered. My mind is free from active thought, and has made an end of craving. 153, 154 153, 154. Looking for the maker of this tabernacle, I shall have to run through a course of many births, so long as I do not find (him); and painful is birth again and again. But now, maker of the tabernacle, thou hast been seen; thou shalt not make up this tabernacle again. All thy rafters are broken, thy ridge-pole is sundered; the mind, approaching the Eternal (visankhara, nirvana), has attained to the extinction of all desires. (153) Through many rounds of rebirth have I ran, looking for the house-builder, but not finding him. Painful is repeated rebirth. Seeking but not finding the House Builder,
I hurried through the rounds of many births.
Painful is birth ever again and again.
153. Many a birth have I undergone in this (process of) faring on (in the round of conditioned existence), seeking the builder of the house and not finding him. Painful is (such) repeated birth. 153. Many births have I traversed seeking the builder; in vain! Weary is the round of births. Trough many of samsara’s births I hasten seeking, finding not the builder of this house: pain is birth again, again. 8. I wandered in Samsara through many a birth, seeking but not finding the builder of the house of life and death. It is sorrowful to be born again and again. (153)
# 9 154. O house-builder, you are seen! You will not build this house again. For your rafters are broken and your ridgepole shattered. My mind has reached the Unconditioned; I have attained the destruction of craving. 154. But now I have seen you, O house-builder; you shall not build this house (for me) again — its rafters are broken; its ridgepole is shattered. My mind has reached the unconditioned; the end of craving has been attained. 154. O builder of the house, I have seen you; you shall not build the house again. All the rafters are broken; the ridgepole is sundered. Mind has arrived at dissolution (nirvana), having attained the extinction of all cravings (tanha). (154) Oh, house-builder, you are seen! You will not build this house again! All your ribs are broken; the roof is destroyed. My mind is dissolute; I have attained the end of all cravings. O House Builder, you have been seen,
You shall not build the house again.
Your rafters have been broken,
Your ridge pole demolished too.
My mind has now attained the Unconditioned.
And reached the end of all craving.
154. House-builder, (now) you are seen! Never again shall you build (me) a house. Your rafters are all broken, your ridgepole shattered. The (conditioned) mind too has gone to destruction: one has attained to the cessation of craving. 154. Now art thou seen, Builder. Never- more shalt thou build the house ! All thy beams are broken ; cast down is thy cornerstone. My mind is set upon Nirvana ; it has attained the extinction of desire. you shall not build a house again, all your beams have given away, rafters of the ridge decayed, mind to the unconditioned gone, exhaustion of craving has it reached. 9. O house-builder, you have been seen! You will not rebuild again. Your framing is all broken, and your ridgepole is destroyed. My mind has attained the unconditioned without any attachment. The end of carving is also achieved. (154)
# 10 155. Those who in youth have not led the holy life, or have failed to acquire wealth, languish like old cranes in the pond without fish. 155. Those who have not practiced spiritual disciplines, who have not acquired wealth in their youth, pine away, like old herons in a lake without fish. 155. They who in youth have never trod the way
Of righteousness, nor garnered wisdom's store.
Like herons in a fishless pool decay.
155. Those who do not practice self-discipline, who do not acquire wealth in their youth, when they become old, pine away, like old herons in a dried-up lake where there are no fish. Those who have not lived the holy life, and have not acquired wealth in their youth, grow old like withered cranes beside a fishless pool. 155 155. Men who have not observed proper discipline, and have not gained treasure in their youth, perish like old herons in a lake without fish. (155) Those, who have not led the holy life, and have not obtained wealth while young, ponder just like old herons in the lake without fish. Having led neither a good life,
Nor acquired riches while young,
They pine away as aged herons
Around a fishless pond.
155. Those who have not led the spiritual life (brahmacariya), or obtained the wealth (of merit) in their youth, (such as these) brood over the past like aged herons in a pond without fish. 155. They who have not lived purely nor stored up riches in their youth, these ruefully ponder, as old herons by a lake without fish. Who have not led the holy life nor riches won while young, they linger on as aged cranes around a fished-out pond. 10. Those who have not led the Holy Life, and who have not acquired wealth in their youth, pine away, like old herons at a pond without fish. (155)
# 11 156. Those who in youth have not lead the holy life, or have failed to acquire wealth, lie sighing over the past, like worn out arrows (shot from) a bow. 156. Those who have not practiced spiritual disciplines, who have not acquired wealth in their youth, lie like worn-out bows, sighing over the past. 156. They who in youth have never trod the way
Of righteousness, nor garnered wisdom's store.
Like broken bows, lie weeping their lost day.
156. Those who do not practice self-discipline, who do not acquire wealth in their youth, lie like broken arrows, lamenting the deeds of the past. Those who have not lived the holy life, and have not acquired wealth in their youth, lie like spent arrows, grieving for times past. 156 156. Men who have not observed proper discipline, and have not gained treasure in their youth, lie, like broken bows, sighing after the past. (156) Those, who have not led the holy life, and have not obtained wealth while young, lie just like arrows shot from a bow, moaning over the past. Having led neither a good life,
Nor acquired riches while young,
They lie about like broken bows,
Sighing about the past.
156. Those who have not led the spiritual life (brahmacariya), or obtained the wealth (of merit) in their youth, (such as these) lie like worn-out arrows, lamenting the things of old. 156. They who have not lived purely nor stored up riches in their youth, are as arrows that are shot in vain : they mourn for the past. Who have not led the holy life nor riches won while young, they languish on, worn-out bows, sighing for the past. 11. Those who have not led the Holy Life, who have not acquired wealth in their youth, lie like worn-out bows, sighing after the past. (156)
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
XII Atta
vagga
The Self The Self The Self The Self Self Self The Self The Self Self Self Self Self
# 1 157. If one holds oneself dear, one should diligently watch oneself. Let the wise man keep vigil during any of the three watches of the night. 157. If you hold yourself dear, guard yourself diligently. Keep vigil (against evil) during one of the three watches of the night. 157. Hast thou regard for self? Then keep thyself well guarded.
Be wise and keep good watch for one of the three watches.
157. If a man esteems the self, let him guard himself with great care. Let the wise man keep vigil over himself, in one of the three watches (of life or of the night). Knowing that one is dear to oneself, one should guard oneself well. For one out of the three watches of the night a wise man should keep watch. 157 157. If a man hold himself dear, let him watch himself carefully; during one at least out of the three watches a wise man should be watchful. (157) If someone holds oneself dear, let him guard himself very well. In any of the three watches of the night let the wise one be watchful. If one holds oneself dear,
One should protect oneself well.
During any of the three watches (of life)
The wise should keep vigil.
157. If a man (really) regards himself as dear, let him well and truly protect himself. During one or another of the three watches (of the night) the spiritually mature person should keep wide awake. 157. IF a man love himself, let him diligently watch himself : the wise will keep vigil for one of the three watches of the night. If one holds oneself as dear, protected, one protects oneself. One who’s wise should be aware through all the watches three. 1. If one holds oneself dear, one should protect oneself well. Of the three watches of his times, the wise man keeps a vigil. (157)
# 2 158. One should first establish oneself in what is proper; then only should one instruct others. Thus the wise man will not be reproached. 158. One should first learn for oneself what is right; then only should one teach others. By wisely following this course of action, one will be beyond reproach. 158. First ground thyself in fitness; next, another teach.
Thus shalt thou wisdom gain and suffer no reproach.
158. Let each first firmly establish himself in right conduct, then only may he admonish others. Such a wise man does not suffer blemish. First he should establish himself in what is right. Then if he teaches others, the wise man will not be corrupted. 158 158. Let each man direct himself first to what is proper, then let him teach others; thus a wise man will not suffer. (158) Let one first establish oneself in what is proper, and then instruct others. A wise one should not be impure. One should first establish oneself
In what is proper,
And then instruct others.
A wise man who acts in this way
Shall never get defiled.
158. First establish yourself in what is suitable, then advise others. The spiritually mature person should not besmirch himself (by acting otherwise). 158. Keep first thyself aright : then mayest thou advise others. So is the wise man un- blameable. One should first establish oneself in what is proper. One may then teach others, and wise, one is not blamed. 2. Let one first establish oneself in what is proper, and then instruct others. Such a wise man will not be defiled. (158)
# 3 159. One should do what one teaches others to do; if one would train others, one should be well controlled oneself. Difficult, indeed, is self-control. 159. One should also do what one instructs others to do. Before trying to train others, one should first train oneself. It is difficult to learn to train oneself. 159. First carry out thyself whate'er thou teachest others.
Self-tamed, thou'lt tame another; but self is hard to tame.
159. Let a man mold himself into what he admonishes others to be. Thus well-controlled he can control others. It is extremely difficult indeed to control one's own self. If one would only apply to oneself what one teaches others, when one was well disciplined oneself one could train others. It is oneself who is hard to train. 159 159. If a man make himself as he teaches others to be, then, being himself well subdued, he may subdue (others); one's own self is indeed difficult to subdue. (159) If only one always did what one advises others! One well restrained can teach others. Indeed, it is difficult to control oneself. As he instructs others
He should himself act.
Himself fully controlled,
He should control others.
Difficult indeed is to control oneself.
159. Should you act as you advise others to act, then it would be (a case of) one who was (self-) controlled exercising control (over others). The self is truly difficult to control. 159. If one so shapes his own life as he directs others, himself controlled, he will duly control others : self, they say, is hard to tame. As one teaches others so should one do oneself. Well-tamed, on may tame others, oneself to tame is hard. 3. If he makes himself as what he instructs others to be, then he can teach others in truth. Self-control is indeed difficult. (159)
# 4 160. One truly is the protector of oneself; who else could the protector be? With oneself fully controlled, one gains a mastery that is hard to gain. 160. You alone are your own refuge; who else could be? With yourself thoroughly controlled, you gain a refuge very difficult to find. 160. Self is the lord of self; who else could be the lord?
By taming self one gains a lord most hard to gain.
160. The self is the master of the self. Who else can that master be? With the self fully subdued, one obtains the sublime refuge which is very difficult to achieve. One is one's own guardian. What other guardian could one have? With oneself well disciplined one obtains a rare guardian indeed. 160 160. Self is the lord of self, who else could be the lord? With self well subdued, a man finds a lord such as few can find. (160) One is indeed one's own lord. What other lord would there be? With oneself well restrained, one will obtain the lord that is so hard to get. Oneself indeed is master of oneself,
Who else could other master be?
With oneself perfectly trained,
One obtains a refuge hard to gain.
160. One is indeed one’s own saviour (or: protector). What other saviour should there be? With oneself well-controlled, one finds a saviour (who is) hard to find. 160. A man is his own helper : who else is there to help ? By self-control man is a rare help to himself. Oneself is refuge of oneself, who else indeed could refuge be? By good training of oneself one gains a refuge hard to gain. 4. Only a man himself can be the savior of himself, who else from outside could be his savior? With oneself controlled, one obtains a savior that is difficult to find. (160)
# 5 161. The evil a witless man does by himself, born of himself and produced by himself, grinds him as a diamond grinds a hard gem. 161. The evil done by oneself, arising in oneself, and caused by oneself crushes those who lack wisdom, as a diamond crushes the rock from which it was formed. 161. The evil done by self, self-born and self-begotten,
Crushes the senseless fool, as a bolt the jar of stone.
161. The sin committed by oneself, born of oneself, produced by oneself, crushes the evil-minded one as the diamond cuts the precious stone. The evil he has done himself and which had its origin and being in himself breaks a fool, like a diamond breaks a precious stone. 161 161. The evil done by oneself, self-begotten, self-bred, crushes the foolish, as a diamond breaks a precious stone. (161) The evil is done by oneself, proceeding from oneself, originating from oneself. It crushes the fool, just like a diamond crushes a hard gem. The evil, done by oneself,
Self-begotten and self-produced,
Crushes the witless one,
As the diamond grinds the hardest gem.
161. The evil done by oneself, born of oneself, produced by oneself, destroys the man of evil understanding as a diamond pulverizes a piece of rock crystal. 161. The ill that is begun and has its growth and its being in self, bruises the foolish one, as the diamond pierces its own matrix. By oneself is evil done, it’s born of self and self-produced. Evil grinds the unwise one as diamond does the hardest gem. 5. Any evil done by a man is born in himself and is caused by himself; and this crushes the unwise man as a diamond grinds a weaker stone. (161)
# 6 162. Just as a single creeper strangles the tree on which it grows, even so, a man who is exceedingly depraved harms himself as only an enemy might wish. 162. As a vine overpowers a tree, suffering overpowers those who do evil, trapping them in a situation that only their enemies would wish them to be in. 162. He who is choked by sins, as a creeper chokes a tree,
Doth to himself what e'en his foes would have him do.
162. As the parasitic maluva creeper destroys the sal tree which it entwines, so the immoral conduct of a man gradually makes of him what his enemy would have him be. A man of great immorality is like a creeper, suffocating the tree it is on. He does to himself just what an enemy would wish him. 162 162. He whose wickedness is very great brings himself down to that state where his enemy wishes him to be, as a creeper does with the tree which it surrounds. (162) Who is of extremely bad morality, like a creeper spread over a Sala tree, he will do unto himself, what an enemy wishes to do unto him. An exceedingly corrupted man is like
A Māluva creeper strangling a sal-tree
Surely, he does unto himself
What his enemy would wish for him.
162. He whose unprincipled behaviour is without limit, like a maluva(-creeper) overspreading a sal tree, does to his own self that which his enemy wishes (to do to him). 162. As the creeper overpowers the tree, so he whose sin is great, works for himself the havoc his enemy would wish for him. He whose conduct’s very bad like oak-tree choked with ivy, so he does towards himself what enemies would wish. 6. And, a man who is exceeding corrupt, is just like a maluva creeper strangling a sal tree; and the man is brought down to that condition in which his own enemy would wish him to be. (162)
# 7 163. Easy to do are things that are bad and harmful to oneself. But exceedingly difficult to do are things that are good and beneficial. 163. It is easy to do things that are bad and unbeneficial to oneself, but it is extremely difficult, indeed, to do things that are beneficial and good. 163. Easy is ill to do and harmful to oneself;
But what is good and wholesome, that is hard to do.
163. It is quite easy to perform evil deeds which are not beneficial to oneself. But it is extremely difficult to perform a deed which is righteous and beneficial. Things which are wrong and to one's own disadvantage are easily enough done, while what is both good and advantageous is extremely hard to do. 163 163. Bad deeds, and deeds hurtful to ourselves, are easy to do; what is beneficial and good, that is very difficult to do. (163) Easy done are deeds, that are wrong and harmful to oneself. What is beneficial and good, that is indeed most difficult to do. Easy to do are those kammas
Which are bad and not benefitting oneself
But those which are good and beneficial
Are difficult indeed to be performed.
163. Easily done are things which are bad and not beneficial to oneself. What is (both) beneficial and good, that is exceedingly difficult to do. 163. Ill is easy to do; it is easy to do harm : hard indeed it is to do helpful and good deeds. Easy is what’s bad to do, what’s harmful to oneself. But what is good, of benefit, is very hard to do. 7. It is easy to do things that are wrong and not beneficial to oneself, but is very difficult, indeed, to do things that are good and beneficial. (163)
# 8 164. Whoever, on account of perverted views, scorns the Teaching of the Perfected Ones, the Noble and Righteous Ones -- that fool, like the bamboo, produces fruits only for self destruction. 164. Foolish people who scoff at the teachings of the wise, the noble, and the good, and who follow false doctrines instead, bring about their own destruction, like the bamboo tree, which dies after bearing fruit. 164. Whose rejects the words of noble righteous saints
On his own head brings ruin by his perversity,
As bamboo trees put forth their fruit and die away.
164. If an evil-minded one, by reason of his false views, reviles the teaching of the Arhats, the Noble Ones, and the virtuous, verily he brings forth the fruit of his own destruction, even as does the katthaka reed. The fool, who out of attachment to a wrong view speaks ill of the religion of the enlightened and noble ones who live according to truth, brings forth fruit to his own downfall, like the offspring of the bamboo. 164 164. The foolish man who scorns the rule of the venerable (Arahat), of the elect (Ariya), of the virtuous, and follows false doctrine, he bears fruit to his own destruction, like the fruits of the Katthaka reed. (164) Who scorns thee teaching of the Arahants, the Noble Ones, living righteously, the fool, who is relying on wrong beliefs, produces fruit just like a bamboo - for his own destruction. Whoso on account of false views
Scorns the teaching of the Noble Ones,
The Worthy and Righteous Ones,
He, the foolish man, destroys himself
Like the bamboo, seeding, finds its end.
164. The man of evil understanding who, on account of his (wrong) views, obstructs (or: rejects) the message of the (Supremely) Worthy, the noble ones, the men of authentic life, that wicked person, like a katthak(-reed), brings forth fruit (i.e., performs actions) to his own destruction. 164. Whoso fondly repudiates the teaching of the noble and virtuous Arahats, following false doctrine, is like the bamboo which bears fruit to its own destruction. Whatever man unwise relies on evil views and so condemns the Teaching of the Arahats, or Noble Ones who Dhamma live, he, as a bamboo fruiting, 8. On account of his false views, the stupid man scorns the teachings of the Arhats, the Nobles Ones, and the Righteous. He gathers fruits for his destruction, like the Kashta reed whose fruits mean its death. (164)
# 9 165. By oneself is evil done; by oneself is one defiled. By oneself is evil left undone; by oneself is one made pure. Purity and impurity depended on oneself; no one can purify another. 165. By oneself is evil done; by oneself is one defiled. By oneself is evil not done; by oneself is one purified. Everyone has the choice to be pure or impure. No one can purify another. 165. By self is evil done; by self is one defiled;
Ill deeds not done by self to self bring purity;
Each for himself is pure; each for himself impure;
Thou can'st not cleanse another man's impurity.
165. By self alone is evil done; by self alone is one defiled; by self alone is evil not done; by self alone is one purified. Purity and impurity depend on oneself; no one can purify another. By oneself one does evil. By oneself one is defiled. By oneself one abstains from evil. By oneself one is purified. Purity and impurity are personal matters. No one can purify someone else. 165 165. By oneself the evil is done, by oneself one suffers; by oneself evil is left undone, by oneself one is purified. Purity and impurity belong to oneself, no one can purify another. (165) The evil is done by oneself; by oneself one becomes impure. The evil is undone by oneself; by oneself one becomes pure. Purity and impurity depend on oneself. No one can purify another. By oneself is evil done,
By oneself does one get defiled,
By oneself is evil left undone,
By oneself is one purified.
Purity or impurity depends on oneself,
No one can purify another.
165. A man besmirches himself by the evil he personally commits. (Similarly) he purifies himself by personally abstaining from evil. Purity and impurity are matters of personal experience: one man cannot purify another. 165. Thou art brought low by the evil thou hast done thyself : by the evil thou hast left undone art thou purified. Purity and impurity are things of man's inmost self; no man can purify another. By oneself is evil done, by oneself defiled, by oneself it’s left undone, by self alone one purified. Purity, impurity on oneself depend, no one can purify another. 9. By oneself the evil is done, and it is oneself who suffers: by oneself the evil is not done, and by one’s self one becomes pure. Purity and impurity depend on oneself. No one can purify another. (165)
# 10 166. Let one not neglect one's own welfare for the sake of another, however great. Clearly understanding one's own welfare, let one be intent upon the good. 166. Do not neglect your own duty for another, however great. Know your own duty and perform it. 166. Mind thy affairs, not others', however great they be;
Right knowledge of one's own brings more prosperity
166. However much one is engaged in activities for the good of others, one should not neglect his own (spiritual) purpose. Having discerned one's own task, let him apply himself to that task with diligence. One should not neglect one's own welfare for that of someone else, however great. When one has understood what one's own welfare really consists of, one should apply oneself to that welfare. 166 166. Let no one forget his own duty for the sake of another's, however great; let a man, after he has discerned his own duty, be always attentive to his duty. (166) Let one not neglect one's own spiritual attainment for other's spiritual attainment, however great. Having fully understood one's own spiritual attainment, let one pursue the true attainment. Fall not away from one's own purpose
For the sake of another, however great,
When once one has seen one's own goal,
One should hold to it fast and firm.
166. (Consequently) one should not neglect one’s own (spiritual) welfare for the welfare of others, great as that may be. Clearly perceiving (what constitutes) one’s personal welfare, one should devote oneself to one’s own good. 166. Even for great benefit to another let no man imperil his own benefit. When he has realised what is for his own good, let him pursue that earnestly. Let none neglect their good for others’ good however great. Know well oneself’s own good and to that good attend. 10. For the sake of others’ welfare, let one do not neglect one’s own welfare, no matter how great. Clearly perceiving one’s own welfare, let one be intent on one’s own goal. (166)
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
XIII Loka
vagga
The World The World The World The World The World The World The World The World The World The World World The World
# 1 167. Follow not the vulgar way; live not in heedlessness; hold not false views; linger not long in worldly existence. 167. Do not pursue sense pleasures; do not be heedless; do not believe false doctrines; do not prolong the world. 167. Follow not the way unworthy;
Live not thou in slothfulness;
Let not doctrines false allure thee;
Turn thy thoughts from worldliness.
167. Let no one follow a degraded course of existence, nor live in indolence; let him not follow false views, nor be a person who prolongs his worldly existence. Don't practice an ignoble way of life, don't indulge in a careless attitude. Don't follow a wrong view, and don't be attached to the world. 167 167. Do not follow the evil law! Do not live on in thoughtlessness! Do not follow false doctrine! Be not a friend of the world. (167) Don't practice inferior teachings; don't connect with negligence. Don't embrace wrong beliefs; don't be attached to the world. Do not follow mean thing,
Do not live in heedlessness,
Do not embrace false views,
Do not be a world-upholder'.
167. Don’t follow inferior principles. Don’t live heedlessly. Don’t entertain false views. Don’t be one who (by following inferior principles etc.) keeps the world going. 167. Let no man foster evil habits ; let no man live in sloth : let none follow false doctrines, none prolong his sojourn in this world. Do not follow base desires, nor live with heedlessness, do not follow wrong beliefs to grow in worldly ways 1. Do not serve base desires. Do not live in heedlessness. Do not embrace false views. Do not sink into the world. (167)
# 2 168. Arise! Do not be heedless! Lead a righteous life. The righteous live happily both in this world and the next. 168. Do not be heedless in standing (at the door for alms); scrupulously observe this practice. One who observes proper practice lives happily both in this world and the next. 168-9. Stand! Arise! Throw sloth away;
Follow the path of righteousness;
Happy he who walks aright,
Here and in the world to come.
168. Awake! Be not heedless. Follow the truth (dhamma). He who embarks upon the path of truth lives happily in this world and in the hereafter. Wake up and don't be careless, but lead a life of well-doing. He who follows righteousness lives happily in this world and the next. 168 168. Rouse thyself! do not be idle! Follow the law of virtue! The virtuous rests in bliss in this world and in the next. (168) Arise! Don't be negligent! Practice the good teaching! One living in truth dwells happily, both in this world and in the next one. Arise! Be not negligent!
Lead a righteous life.
For one who lives a righteous life
Dwells in peace here and hereafter.
168. Get up! Don’t be heedless! Live practising the Dhamma, (the Dhamma) which is good conduct. One who lives practising the Dhamma (dhammacari) dwells happily (both) in this world and the other (world). 168. Up ! Idle not, but follow after good. The good man lives happy in this world and the next. Rouse yourself, be diligent, in Dhamma faring well. Who dwells in Dhamma’s happy in this birth and the next. 2. Arise, do not be negligent in standing (at people’s doors for alms). Observe and practice the principle of good conduct. One who observes this practice lives happily in this world, and beyond. (168)
# 3 169. Lead a righteous life; lead not a base life. The righteous live happily both in this world and the next. 169. Observe proper practice; do not observe improper practice. One who observes proper practice lives happily both in this world and the next. 169. Follow the law of morality; do not follow the law of immorality; he who embarks upon the path of truth lives happily in this world and in the hereafter. Lead a life of righteousness, and not a life of wrong-doing. He who follows righteousness lives happily in this world and the next. 169 169. Follow the law of virtue; do not follow that of sin. The virtuous rests in bliss in this world and in the next. (169) Practice the good teaching; don't practice the bad one! One living in truth dwells happily, both in this world and in the next one. By Dhamma should one lead one's life
And not embrace corrupted means.
For one who lives the Dhamma life
Dwells in peace here and hereafter.
169. Live practising the Dhamma. Do not live behaving badly. One who lives practising the Dhamma (dhammacari) dwells happily (both) in this world and the other (world). 169. Follow after virtue, not after vice. The virtuous live happy in this world and the next. Fare in Dhamma coursing well, in evil courses do not fare. Who dwells in Dhamma’s happy in this birth and the next. 3. Practice the principle of good conduct, not evil conduct. One who observes this practice lives happily in this world, and beyond. (169)
# 4 170. One who looks upon the world as a bubble and a mirage, him the King of Death sees not. 170. Look on the world of aggregates as a bubble; look on it as a mirage. Then, the King of Death will not find you. 170. As a bubble on the water,
As a phantom of the sands,
Him who thus the world despiseth,
Death the king cannot behold.
170. Look upon the world as a bubble, regard it as a mirage; who thus perceives the world, him Mara, the king of death, does not see. Look on the world as a bubble, look on it as a mirage. The King of Death never finds him who views the world like that. 170 170. Look upon the world as a bubble, look upon it as a mirage: the king of death does not see him who thus looks down upon the world. (170) As if one would see a bubble, as if one would see a mirage, who observes the world like that, the King of Death does not see him. Whoso would look upon the world
Just as one would see a bubble
And as one would view a mirage -
Him the King of Death finds not.
170. Look upon (the world) as a bubble; look upon (it) as a mirage. The King of Death does not see one who looks upon the world in this way. 170. The king of Death sees not him who regards the world as a bubble, a mirage. Just as a bubble may be seen, just as a faint mirage, so should the world be viewed that the Death-king sees one not. 4. When one looks upon this world as a bubble, as a mirage, one is not seen by the King of Death. (170)
# 5 171. Come! Behold this world, which is like a decorated royal chariot. Here fools flounder, but the wise have no attachment to it. 171. Come look at this world! Is it not like a painted royal chariot? The immature are immersed in this world of aggregates, but the wise are not attached to it. 171. Lo! this world in all its splendour,
Like a royal car adorned,
Wherein many a fool is seated,
Hath no power to bind the wise.
171. Come, behold this world, resplendent like unto a royal chariot. Fools are immersed in it; but the wise have no attachment for it. Come, look at the world as a gilded royal carriage, in which fools get bogged down, while men of understanding have no attachment to it. 171 171. Come, look at this glittering world, like unto a royal chariot; the foolish are immersed in it, but the wise do not touch it. (171) Come and look at this world, similar to a beautiful king's chariot. Where the fools sink down, for those, who understand, there is no attachment. Come you all and behold this world
Like an ornamented royal chariot,
Wherein the fools are deeply sunk.
But for those who know there is not bond.
171. Come, (just) look at this world, which is like a decorated royal chariot in which the spiritually immature sink down (or: are dejected), but (with regard to which) there is no attachment on the part of those who really know. 171. Come then, think of the world as a painted chariot of the king a morass where fools are sinking, where the wise take no pleasure. Come, look upon this world like to a rich , royal chariot wherein fools lounge at ease but alert ones linger not. 5. Come and look at this world. It is like an ornamented royal chariot, wherein fools sink, but the wise men do not attach to it. (171)
# 6 172. He who having been heedless is heedless no more, illuminates this world like the moon freed from clouds. 172. When those who were formerly heedless become mindful, they give light to the world, like the full moon breaking free from behind the clouds. 172. He who formerly was slothful,
But is slothful now no more,
Lighteth up the world with splendour,
As the moon from clouds released.
172. He who formerly was heedless, but, after due consideration, becomes vigilant, illumines the world as the moon freed from a cloud. Even if previously careless, when a man later stops being careless, he illuminates the world, like the moon breaking away from a cloud. 172 172. He who formerly was reckless and afterwards became sober, brightens up this world, like the moon when freed from clouds. (172) Who has been formerly negligent, but later is not, illuminates this world like a moon freed from cloud. Whoso was previously negligent
But afterwards practises vigilance -
He illumines the world here and now
Like the moon emerging from the cloud.
172. One who having formerly been heedless later is not heedless, lights up the world like the moon (when) freed from clouds. 172. He who in former days was slothful, and has put off sloth, lights up the world as the moon freed of the clouds. Whoso was heedless formerly but later lives with heedfulness illuminates the world as moon when free of clouds. 6. Whoever was unwise in early days but later became wise, illumines this world, like that of the moon when free from clouds. (172)
# 7 173. He, who by good deeds covers the evil he has done, illuminates this world like the moon freed from clouds. 173. When their good deeds overwhelm the bad ones that they have done, they give light to the world, like the moon breaking free from behind the clouds. 173. He who, having once done evil,
Covers up his ill with good,
Lighteth up the world with splendour,
As the moon from clouds released.
173. He whose evil deeds are superseded by meritorious deeds, illumines the world as the moon freed from a cloud. When a man's bad deeds are covered over by good ones, he illuminates the world, like the moon breaking away from a cloud. 173 173. He whose evil deeds are covered by good deeds, brightens up this world, like the moon when freed from clouds. (173) Who covers his evil deeds with good ones, illuminates this world like a moon freed from cloud. Who by his wholesome deeds
Removes the evil done -
He illumines the world here and now
Like the moon emerging from the cloud.
173. One who covers over the evil deeds he has done with (ethically) skilful actions, lights up this world like the moon (when) freed from clouds. 173. He who covers his idle deeds with goodness lights up the world as the moon freed of clouds. Who by wholesome kamma covers up the evil done illumines the world as moon when free from clouds. 7. Whoever overcomes the evil he has done with the good he does afterward, illumines this world, like that of the moon when free from clouds. (173)
# 8 174. Blind is the world; here only a few possess insight. Only a few, like birds escaping from the net, go to realms of bliss. 174. The people of this world are blind; in this world, only a few can see clearly (with Insight). Just as only a few birds are able to free themselves from a net, only a few find their way to the world of the gods (and nibbāna). 174. All this world is wrapped in darkness;
Few be they that are not blind;
Like the birds that 'scape the fowler,
Few be they that go to heaven.
174. This world is blind. Few are they who can see things as they are. As birds escaped from the net, few go to heaven. Blinded indeed is this world. Few are those who see the truth. Like a bird breaking out of the net, few are those who go to heaven. 174 174. This world is dark, few only can see here; a few only go to heaven, like birds escaped from the net. (174) Blind is this world. Just a few can see clearly here. Few go to heaven, like a bird released from a snare. Blind is this world,
Few are they who clearly see
As the birds escaping from a net,
Few are they who go to Heaven.

Swans fly on the path of the sun,
Magicians pass through the air.
174. This world is (mentally) blinded; few see clearly. Few are those who, like birds freed from the net, go to heaven. 174. Blinded are the men of this world ; few there are who have eyes to see : few are the birds which escape the fowler's net ; few are they who go to heaven. This world is blind-become few are here who see within as few the birds break free from net so those who go to heavens. 8. This world is blind (in darkness). Few are those who clearly see. Just as few birds can escape from a net, few can go to a blissful state. (174)
# 9 175. Swans fly on the path of the sun; men pass through the air by psychic powers; the wise are led away from the world after vanquishing Mara and his host. 175. Swans fly on the path of the sun; those with psychic powers fly through space; the wise are led away from this world, after conquering Māra and his train. 175. Lo! the swans fly on the sun's path,
Fly by magic through the air;
Wise men from the world departing
Conquer Death and all his hosts.
175. Swans fly in the path of the sun; those who possess psychic powers (iddhi) go through the air. The wise, having conquered Mara and his hosts, go forth out of this world. Wild swans take the path of the sun. Men with powers travel through space, but the wise step right out of the world, by conquering Mara and his host. 175 175. The swans go on the path of the sun, they go through the ether by means of their miraculous power; the wise are led out of this world, when they have conquered Mara and his train. (175) Swans travel on the path of the sun. People travel through space by supernatural powers. Wise ones are guided away from the world, having conquered Mara with his army. The wise go forth out of the world,
Having conquered M�ra with all his troop.
175. Swans fly on the path of the sun. Those with supernormal powers travel through the air. The wise, having conquered Mara and his army, are led (away) from the world. 175. Through the sky fly the swans : Rishis too pass through the air. The wise leave the world altogether, deserting Mara and his hosts. Swans upon the sun’s path fly, the powerful through space, conquering Mara and his host away from the world the wise are led. 9. Swans follow the path of the sun. (Men) go through air by psychic powers. Wise men who have conquered Mara and his host are led away from the world (without coming into birth again). (175)
# 10 176. For a liar who has violated the one law (of truthfulness) who holds in scorn the hereafter, there is no evil that he cannot do. 176. Those who transgress the central law of life, who speak falsely or scoff at the life to come, are capable of any evil. 176. He who by false words transgressing
Breaks one tittle of the Norm;
He who future life renounceth
Every wicked deed will do.
176. There is no sin that a man will not commit who utters falsehood, who has transgressed the one law of truthfulness (dhamma), and who has rejected the other world. When a man has already violated one rule, when he is a liar and rejects the idea of a future world, there is no evil he is not capable of. 176 176. If a man has transgressed one law, and speaks lies, and scoffs at another world, there is no evil he will not do. (176) For the person, who has transgressed the one law (of truthfulness) and is speaking falsely, and has rejected the other world, there is no evil that could not be done. By him who breaks the fourth precept,
Who at all time speaks untruth,
Who regards not the world beyond,
There is no evil that cannot be done.
176. There is no wrong that cannot be committed by a lying person who has transgressed one (good) principle (i.e., that of truthfulness), and who has given up (all thought of) the other world. 176. There is no wrong he would not do who breaks one precept, speaking lies and mocking at the life to come. For one who falsely speaks, who disregards the Dhamma, who other lives denies: no evil this one will not do. 10. There is no evil that cannot be done by the liar, who has transgressed the law (of truthfulness), and who is indifferent to a world beyond. (176)
# 11 177. Truly, misers fare not to heavenly realms; nor, indeed, do fools praise generosity. But the wise man rejoices in giving, and by that alone does he become happy hereafter. 177. Misers do not go to the celestial realms. Fools do not praise generosity. The wise rejoice in generosity and so gain happiness in the life to come. 177. Those who covet reach not heaven;
Fools care not for charity;
He who charity approveth
Reacheth heavenly joy thereby.
177. Indeed the miserly do not go to the world of the gods; the foolish do not praise liberality. But the wise man who takes pleasure in giving, through that very act becomes happy in the next world. Miserly people certainly do not go to heaven. Fools for sure do not praise generosity, but the wise man who takes pleasure in giving is thereby happy hereafter. 177 177. The uncharitable do not go to the world of the gods; fools only do not praise liberality; a wise man rejoices in liberality, and through it becomes blessed in the other world. (177) Selfish ones do not get to the world of the gods. Fools do not praise giving. And the wise one enjoys giving. Just because of that he is happy hereafter. Verily, the misers go not to celestial realms.
Fools do not indeed praise liberality.
The wise, however, rejoice in giving
And thereby become happy hereafter.
177. Truly, misers do not get to the world of the gods. (Only) the spiritually immature do not praise giving. The wise man rejoices in giving, and therefore is happy in the hereafter. 177. Misers go not to the realm of gods : therefore he is a fool who does not delight in liberality. The wise delighting in liberality come thereby with gladness to the other world. To heavenly realms the mean don’t fare, fools magnanimity ne’er acclaim, but the one of wisdom rejoices at giving and happy will be in future lives. 11. Certainly, misers do not go to the celestial realms. Fools do not indeed praise liberality. The wise man rejoices in giving and thereby becomes happy thereafter. (177)
# 12 178. Better than sole sovereignty over the earth, better than going to heaven, better even than lordship over all the worlds is the supramundane Fruition of Stream Entrance. 178. Better than ruling this world, better than going to the realm of the gods, better than being lord of all the worlds is one step taken on the path to nibbāna. 178. Rule on earth and joy in heaven,
Sovreignty of all the worlds—
These are all by him transcended
Who hath entered on the stream.
178. The fruit of entering the stream (the path) is superior to that of the sole sovereignty of the world, or going to heaven, or the supreme lordship over the whole universe. Better than being sole king of the whole earth, better than going to heaven or sovereignty over the whole universe is the fruit of becoming a stream-winner. 178 178. Better than sovereignty over the earth, better than going to heaven, better than lordship over all worlds, is the reward of the first step in holiness. (178) From sole sovereignty over the earth, or from going to heaven, from lordship over the whole world, the fruit of Entering the Stream is the best. Than sole sovereighnty over the earth,
Than going to celestial worlds,
Than lordship over all the worlds,
Is the fruit of a Stream-winner.
178. The Fruit of Stream Entry is better than sole sovereignty over the earth, (better) than going to heaven, (better) than lordship over all the worlds. 178. Good is kingship of the earth ; good is birth in heaven; good is universal empire; better still is the fruit of conversion. Than o’er the earth sole sovereignty, than going to heaven, than lordship over all the worlds: better the Steam-winner’s fruit. 12. Better than absolute sovereignty over the earth, better than going to heaven, better than even lordship over all the worlds is the fruit of a Stream-Winner. (178)
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
XIV Buddha
vagga
The Buddha The Awakened One The Awakened One The Enlightened One The Buddhas The Buddha (The Awakened) The Buddha The Enlightened One The Enlightened One The Buddha The Buddha The Buddha
# 1 179. By what track can you trace that trackless Buddha of limitless range, whose victory nothing can undo, whom none of the vanquished defilements can ever pursue? 179. All moral defilements have been completely conquered in the Awakened One; no further moral defilements can arise in Him in this world. By what track can you lead the Buddha, the Awakened One, whose wisdom is infinite, into your trap? 179. The Awakened One, unconquered Conqueror,
Whose conquest naught in this world can undo.
Who ranges o'er His boundless sphere untraced.
By what tracks can ye lead Him to rebirth?
179. By what path will you lead the Buddha of infinite range of perception, the Pathless One, whose conquest of passions cannot be undone, into whose conquest no one in this world enters? He whose victory is not relost, and whose victory no-one in the world can take away, that Buddha, whose home is in the infinite, pathless as he is, by what path will you lead him? 179 179. He whose conquest is not conquered again, into whose conquest no one in this world enters, by what track can you lead him, the Awakened, the Omniscient, the trackless? (179) Whose victory cannot be turned into defeat, nobody in the world can pursue his victory. By what way will you destroy such an Awakened one, trackless and of endless sphere? Whose conquest is not turned into defeat,
Whom not even a bit of conquered passion follows -
That trackless Buddha of infinite range,
By which way will you lead him?
179. That Enlightened One whose sphere is endless, whose victory is rreversible, and after whose victory no (defilements) remain (to be conquered), by what track will you lead him (astray), the Trackless One? 179. Into his victory which is never reversed there enters no element of weakness : through what fault can you lead captive the faultless one, the Buddha whose sphere is Nirvana ? That Buddha traceless of infinite range whose victory none may e’er undo, whose vanquished follow to no world, then by which track will you trace him? 1. By what worldly path could you lead the Buddha, who, enjoying all, can go through the pathless ways of infinite range? The Buddha is the one whose conquest (of passion) is not turned into defeat, and whom no one can conquer. (179)
# 2 180. By what track can you trace that trackless Buddha of limitless range, in whom exists no longer, the entangling and embroiling craving that perpetuates becoming? 180. The Buddha, the Awakened One, whose wisdom is infinite, who is free from the net of desires and the pollution of moral defilements and from all conditioning, by what track can you lead Him into your trap? 180. Free from the snares of passion's outspread net,
The Awakened One, whom longing cannot draw,
Who ranges o'er His boundless sphere untraced.
By what tracks can ye lead Him to rebirth?
180. By what path will you lead the Buddha of infinite range of perception, the Pathless One, in whom there is not that entangling and poisonous craving which leads one astray (to another state of birth)? He who has no entrapping, clinging desire to lead him in any direction, that Buddha, whose home is in the infinite, pathless as he is, by what path will you lead him? 180 180. He whom no desire with its snares and poisons can lead astray, by what track can you lead him, the Awakened, the Omniscient, the trackless? (180) Whose ensnaring craving and thirst that could carry him away does not exist anywhere, by what way will you destroy such an Awakened one, trackless and of endless sphere? Whom no entangling and poisonous
Passions can lead astray -
That trackless Buddha of infinite range,
By which way will you lead him?
180. That Enlightened One in whom there is not that ensnaring, entangling raving to lead anywhere (in conditioned existence), and whose sphere is ndless, by what track will you lead him (astray), the Trackless One? 180. By what fault will you lead captive the faultless Buddha, whose sphere is Nirvana ? In him are no clinging meshes of desire to lead him captive. That Buddha traceless of infinite range in whom’s no entangling craving and no ensnaring not anywhere lead, then by which track will you trace him? 2. By what worldly path could you lead the Buddha, who, enjoying all, can go through the pathless way of infinite range? The Buddha is the one whom there is not that entangling, embroiling, craving to lead (to any life) (180)
# 3 181. Those wise ones who are devoted to meditation and who delight in the calm of renunciation -- such mindful ones, Supreme Buddhas, even the gods hold dear. 181. The wise who are established in meditation take delight in the peace of liberation from sensory pleasures and moral defilements. Such wise and mindful ones, who truly understand the Four Noble Truths, are cherished even by the gods. 181. Those sages who, to meditation given,
Delight in freedom's bliss, with mind controlled,
Gods envy Them, Those All-Awakened Ones.
181. Those wise ones who are absorbed in meditation, who take delight in the inner calm of renunciation, such mindful and perfectly awakened ones even the devas (gods) hold dear. Those wise men, who are much given to meditation and find pleasure in the peace of a spiritual way of life, even the devas envy them perfect Buddhas and recollected as they are. 181 181. Even the gods envy those who are awakened and not forgetful, who are given to meditation, who are wise, and who delight in the repose of retirement (from the world). (181) The wise ones, who are intent upon meditation, delighting in renunciation and calm, completely awakened and wakeful ones, even the gods do envy them. Absorbed in meditation practice,
Delighting in renunciation's peace,
Mindful, wise and fully enlightened -
Such men even the gods hold dear.
181. Those wise ones who are intent on absorption (in higher meditative states) nd who delight in the calm of renunciation, even the gods love them, those horoughly enlightened and mindful ones. 181. The gods themselves emulate the truly wise and mindful, who are busy in meditation and prudent, delighting in the peace of Nirvana. E’er intent on concentration, joyful in peace of letting go, mindful, wise, the perfect Buddhas, to even devas they are dear. 3. The wise ones who are intent on meditation, who delight in the peace of renunciation (i.e. Nirvana), even the gods hold dear such mindful perfect Buddhas. (181)
# 4 182. Hard is it to be born a man; hard is the life of mortals. Hard is it to gain the opportunity of hearing the Sublime Truth, and hard to encounter is the arising of the Buddhas. 182. It is hard to obtain human birth; harder is the life of mortals; harder still to get the opportunity to hear the true Dhamma. Rare is the appearance of a Buddha. 182. To gain a birth as man is hard indeed;
'Tis hard to get one's living in the world;
Hard is the hearing of the doctrine true;
Hardest to be an All-Awakened One.
182. Difficult is it to be born as a human being; difficult is the existence of mortals; difficult is the hearing of the Sublime Truth; rare is the appearance of the Enlightened Ones (Buddhas). A human birth is hard to achieve. Difficult is the life of mortals. To hear the true teaching is difficult, and the achievement of Buddhahood is difficult. 182 182. Difficult (to obtain) is the conception of men, difficult is the life of mortals, difficult is the hearing of the True Law, difficult is the birth of the Awakened (the attainment of Buddhahood). (182) Hard to get is the human birth; difficult is the life of a mortal. Difficult is listening to the True Dharma; hard to come by is the appearance of the Awakened Ones. Hard is it to be born as a man,
Hard is the life of immortals,
Hard is it to hear the Truth Sublime,
Hard as well is the Buddha's rise.
182. Difficult is the attainment of the human state. Difficult is the life of mortals. Difficult is the hearing of the Real Truth (saddhamma). Difficult is the appearance of the Enlightened Ones. 182. Arduous is human birth : arduous is mortal life : arduous is hearing of the Law : arduous the uprising of Buddhas. Human birth is hard to gain, hard for mortals is their life, to come to Dhamma True is hard, rare the Buddha’s arising. 4. Birth is rare as a human being. The life of mortals is hard. Hearing of the Sublime Truth is hard. The appearance of the Buddhas is rare. (182)
# 5 183. To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind -- this is the teaching of the Buddhas. 183. Avoid all evil, cultivate the good, purify your mind: this sums up the teaching of the Buddhas. 183. "Refrain thyself from every evil deed;
Stablish thyself in good; cleanse thine own thoughts"—
This is the message of the Awakened Ones.
183. Abstention from all evil, the doing of good deeds, and the purification of the mind, is the admonition of the Enlightened Ones. To abstain from all evil, the practice of good, and the thorough purification of one's mind -- this is the teaching of the Buddhas. 183 183. Not to commit any sin, to do good, and to purify one's mind, that is the teaching of (all) the Awakened. (183) Not doing the evil deeds, Gathering the wholesome, Purifying one's own mind - That is teaching of the buddhas. Abstention from all evil,
Cultivation of the wholesome,
Purification of the heart;
This is the Message of the Buddhas.
183. The not doing of anything evil, undertaking to do what is (ethically) skilful kusala), (and) complete purification of the mind – this is the ordinance (sasana) of the Enlightened Ones. 183. " Eschew all evil : cherish good : cleanse your inmost thoughts " this is the teaching of Buddhas. Every evil never doing and in wholesomeness increasing and one’s heart well-purifying: this is the Buddha’s Teaching. 5. Do not do any evil. Do cultivate good. Do purify one’s mind — this is the teaching of the Buddha. (183)
# 6 184. Enduring patience is the highest austerity. "Nibbana is supreme," say the Buddhas. He is not a true monk who harms another, nor a true renunciate who oppresses others. 184. Cultivate patience and forbearance, and attain nibbāna, the highest goal of life, according to the Awakened Ones. A spiritual aspirant does not harm others; one who harms others is not a true spiritual aspirant. 184. Long-sufferance is the best austerity;
Nibbāna, say the Awakened Ones, is best.
184. Forbearance which is long-suffering is the highest austerity. The Buddhas declare nirvana to be the supreme state. Verily he is not an anchorite who harms another; nor is he an ascetic who causes grief to another. Long-suffering patience is the supreme ascetic practice. Nirvana is supreme, say the Buddhas. He is certainly not an ascetic who hurts others, and nor is he a man of religion who causes suffering to others. 184 184. The Awakened call patience the highest penance, long-suffering the highest Nirvana; for he is not an anchorite (pravragita) who strikes others, he is not an ascetic (sramana) who insults others. (184) Patience and forgiveness is the highest ascetic practice. The Awakened Ones say the Nirvana to be the highest. A monk does not hurt others. One, who harms others, is not a monk. Forbearance is the highest ascetic practice,
'Nibbana is supreme'; say the Buddhas.
He is not a gone forth' who harms another.
He is not a recluse who molests another.
184. Patient endurance is the best form of penance. ‘Nirvana is the Highest,’ say he Enlightened Ones. No (true) goer forth (from the household life) is he who njures another, nor is he a true asketic who persecutes others. 184. " Patience and fortitude is the supreme asceticism : Nirvana is above all," say the Buddhas. He is no recluse who harms others : nor is he who causes grief an ascetic [samana]. Patience’s the austerity supreme, Nibbana’s supreme the Buddhas say. One who irks or others harms is not ordained or monk become 6. Forbearing patience is the highest sacrifice. Nirvana is supreme. This say the Buddhas. If a man hurts another, he is not a recluse. If a man oppresses another, he is not an ascetic. (184)
# 7 185. Not despising, not harming, restraint according to the code of monastic discipline, moderation in food, dwelling in solitude, devotion to meditation -- this is the teaching of the Buddhas. 185. One should neither find fault with others nor injure them. Rather, one should live in accordance with the Fundamental Moral Code. One should be moderate in eating and sleeping, should dwell in a secluded place, and should devote oneself to higher concentration. This sums up the teaching of the Buddhas. 185. "Revile not, harm not, live by rule restrained;
Of food take little; sleep and sit alone;
In meditation keep thy thoughts controlled"—
This is the message of the Awakened Ones.
185. Not reviling, not injuring, practicing restraint according to the moral code (patimokkha) leading to freedom, moderation in eating, living in solitude, dwelling with diligence on the highest thoughts — this is the teaching of the Buddhas. Not to speak harshly and not to harm others, self restraint in accordance with the rules of the Order, moderation in food, a secluded dwelling, and the cultivation of the higher levels of consciousness -- this is the teaching of the Buddhas. 185 185. Not to blame, not to strike, to live restrained under the law, to be moderate in eating, to sleep and sit alone, and to dwell on the highest thoughts,--this is the teaching of the Awakened. (185) Not speaking evil, not hurting, restraint in precepts, moderation in food, solitary dwelling, pursuing meditation - this is the teaching of the Buddhas. To speak no ill,
To do no harm,
To observe the Rules,
To be moderate in eating,
To live in a secluded abode,
To devote oneself to meditation;
This is the Message of the Buddhas.
185. Not to speak evil, not to injure, to exercise restraint through the observance of the (almsman’s) code of conduct, to be moderate in diet, and to occupy oneself with higher mental states – this is the ordinance (sasana) of the Enlightened Ones. 185. Hurt none by word or deed, be consistent in well-doing : be moderate in food, dwell in solitude, and give yourselves to meditation this is the advice of Buddhas. Not reviling, neither harming, restrained to limit ‘freedom’s’ way, knowing reason in one’s food, dwelling far in solitude, and striving in the mind sublime: this is the Buddha’s Teaching. 7. Not insulting, not harming, restraint according to the Fundamental Moral Code, moderation in food, secluded abode, intent on higher consciousness — this is the teaching of the Buddhas. (185)
# 8 186-187. There is no satisfying sensual desires, even with the rain of gold coins. For sensual pleasures give little satisfaction and much pain. Having understood this, the wise man finds no delight even in heavenly pleasures. The disciple of the Supreme Buddha delights in the destruction of craving. 186—187. Even a shower of gold cannot quench sense desire; sense desire gives little pleasure and is fraught with evil consequences. Knowing this, the true disciples of the Fully Enlightened One find no delight even in celestial pleasures, but, instead, rejoice in the cessation of craving. 186. "Lust is not sated, tho' it rain gold coins;
Brief is the pleasure, great the pains of lust"—
Whoso saith this and knows it, he is wise.
186, 187. There is no satisfying the passions even by a shower of gold coins; the wise man, knowing that sense delights are of fleeting pleasure and productive of pain, finds no joy even in celestial pleasures. The true disciple of the Fully Enlightened One delights only in the destruction of all worldly desires. There is no satisfying the senses, not even with a shower of money. "The senses are of slight pleasure and really suffering." When a wise man has realised this, he takes no pleasure, as a disciple of the Buddhas, even in the pleasures of heaven. Instead he takes pleasure in the elimination of craving. 186, 187 186. There is no satisfying lusts, even by a shower of gold pieces; he who knows that lusts have a short taste and cause pain, he is wise; (186) Even by rain of coins one cannot be satisfied in sensual desires. The wise man, having understood that sensual desires give little pleasure and are painful, [continued in 187] Not in a rain of golden coins
Is satisfaction to be found,
'Of little joy, but paintful are sesual pleasures';
Thus the wise man clearly comprehends.
Even in the heavenly pleasures
He finds no satisfaction.
In the destruction of all desires,
The fully-Awakened One's disciple delights.
186. Not (even) in a shower of money is satisfaction of desires to be found. ‘Worldly pleasures are of little relish, (indeed) painful.’ Thus understanding, the spiritually mature person 186. Not by a shower of gold is satisfaction of the senses found: "little pleasure, lasting pain," so thinks the sage. Not by rain of golden coins is found desires’ satiety, desires are dukkha, of little joy, thus a wise one understands. 8-9. Contentment in sensual pleasures does not arise by a shower of gold coins. Sensual pleasures are of little sweetness and pain. Knowing thus, the wise man finds no delight even in heavenly pleasures. The disciple of the Fully Enlightened One delights in the destruction of craving. (186-187)
# 9 187. He finds no pleasure e'en in heaven's delights;
He finds his joy in slaying all desire,
That follower of the All-Awakened Ones.
187. Even in heavenly pleasures he finds no satisfaction, the disciple who is fully awakened delights only in the destruction of all desires. (187) [continued from 186] he does not find liking even for divine pleasures. A student of the truly and completely Awakened One is devoted to destruction of cravings. Not in a rain of golden coins
Is satisfaction to be found,
'Of little joy, but paintful are sesual pleasures';
Thus the wise man clearly comprehends.
Even in the heavenly pleasures
He finds no satisfaction.
In the destruction of all desires,
The fully-Awakened One's disciple delights.
187. takes no delight even in heavenly pleasures. The disciple of the Fully, Perfectly Enlightened One takes delight (only) in the destruction of craving. 187. The follower of the true Buddha finds no delight even in divine pleasures : but his joy is in the destruction of desire [tanha]. Even with pleasures heavenly that one finds no delight, the perfect Buddha’s pupil delights in craving’s end.
# 10 188. Driven only by fear, do men go for refuge to many places -- to hills, woods, groves, trees and shrines. 188. Driven by fear, people run for safety to mountains and forests, to sacred spots and shrines. 188. To many a refuge frightened mortals flee,
Mountains and forests, groves and sacred trees;
188. Men driven by fear betake themselves to numerous refuges, such as mountains, forests, groves, sacred trees and shrines. Driven by fear, men take to many a refuge, in mountains, forests, parks, sacred groves and shrines, but these are not a secure kind of refuge. By taking to this sort of refuge one is not released from suffering. He who has gone to Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha for refuge, though, and who with true wisdom understands the Four Noble Truths of Suffering, the Origin of Suffering, the End of Suffering and the Noble Eightfold Path, leading to the Elimination of Suffering, this is a secure refuge, this is the ultimate refuge; by taking to this refuge one is indeed released from all suffering. 188, 189, 190, 191, 192 188. Men, driven by fear, go to many a refuge, to mountains and forests, to groves and sacred trees. (188) People, driven by fear, go for the refuge to many places: mountains, forests, gardens, trees and shrines. Many men in their fear
Betake themselves for a refuge
To hills, woods, gardens
Sacred trees and shrines.
188. Many people, out of fear, flee for refuge to (sacred) hills, woods, groves, trees, and shrines. 188. Often do men in terror seek sanctuary in mountains or jungles, by sacred groves or trees ; Many a refuge do they seek on hills, in woods, to sacred trees, to monasteries and shrines they go. Folk by fear tormented. 10-11. Men compelled by fear go to many a refuge — to hills, woods, groves, trees and shrines. But those are not safe refuge, and no such refuge is supreme. One is not freed from an ill by resorting to such a refuge. (188-189)
# 11 189. Such, indeed, is no safe refuge; such is not the refuge supreme. Not by resorting to such a refuge is one released from all suffering. 189. But none of these is a safe refuge, none is the highest refuge, because they cannot free one from suffering. 189. These are no refuge safe, no sure retreat,
By these we are not from all woe released.
189. Verily, none of these is a safe refuge, nor is it the supreme refuge. For even after arriving at a refuge, one is not emancipated from all suffering. 189. But that is not a safe refuge, that is not the best refuge; a man is not delivered from all pains after having gone to that refuge. (189) This refuge is not safe; this refuge is not supreme. Having come to such a refuge, one will not be free from all suffering. Such a refuge is not secure,
Such a refuge is not supreme.
To such a refuge should one go,
One is not released from all sorrow.
189. In reality this is not a safe refuge. In reality this is not the best refuge. Fleeing to such a refuge one is not released from all suffering. 189. In them is no safe sanctuary ; in them is not the supreme sanctuary ; in them is not that sanctuary whither a man may go and cast aside his cares. Such refuge isn’t secure, such refuge isn’t supreme. From all dukkha one’s not free unto that refuge gone.
# 12 190-191. He who has gone for refuge to the Buddha, the Teaching and his Order, penetrates with transcendental wisdom the Four Noble Truths -- suffering, the cessation of suffering, and the Noble Eightfold Path leading to the cessation of suffering. 90—191. Take refuge in the Buddha, the Dhamma, and the Saṅgha, and, with full insight, you will grasp the Four Noble Truths: suffering; the cause of suffering; the end of suffering; and the Noble Eightfold Path that takes you beyond suffering. 190. He who takes refuge in the Awakened One,
The Doctrine and the Brotherhood, beholds
By right insight the Fourfold Noble Truths,
190. He who takes refuge in the Enlightened One (buddha), in his Doctrine (dhamma), and in his Community of Monks (sangha), perceives with clarity of wisdom the Four Noble Truths, namely: 190. He who takes refuge with Buddha, the Law, and the Church; he who, with clear understanding, sees the four holy truths:-- (190) And who has gone for refuge to the Buddha, Dharma and Sangha, sees with a true wisdom Four Noble Truths. He who takes refuge in
The Buddha, the Dhamma and the Sa�gha
Sees with wisdom the Four Noble Truths;
Suffering,
The cause of suffering,
The cessation of suffering,
The Noble Eightfold Path leading to
The cessation of suffering.
190. He who goes for refuge to the Enlightened One, to the Truth, and to the Spiritual Community, and who sees with perfect wisdom the Four Ariyan Truths – 190. But he who goes for sanctuary to the Buddha, the Dhamma, and the Sangha looks in his wisdom for the four noble truths : But going for refuge to Buddha, to Dhamma and the Sangha too, one sees with perfect wisdom the tetrad of the Noble Truths: 12-14. The one who has gone for refuge to the Buddhas, the Dharma and the Sangha, sees with the right knowledge, the Four Noble Truths — Suffering, the Cause of Suffering, the Transcending of Suffering, and the Cessation of Suffering, which are led by the Noble Eightfold Paths. This is indeed secure refuge. This is indeed supreme refuge. By seeking such refuge, one is released from all suffering. (190-192)
# 13 191. Sorrow and sorrow's cause and sorrow's ceasing,
The Noble Eightfold Path that leads thereto—
191, 192. Suffering, the Origin of Suffering, the Cessation of Suffering, the Noble Eightfold Path that leads to the cessation of suffering.
That, verily, is the safe refuge and the supreme refuge. After having arrived at that refuge, a man is emancipated from all suffering.
191. Viz. pain, the origin of pain, the destruction of pain, and the eightfold holy way that leads to the quieting of pain;-- (191) Suffering, origin of suffering, overcoming of suffering, and the noble eightfold path, leading to appeasement of suffering. He who takes refuge in
The Buddha, the Dhamma and the Sangha
Sees with wisdom the Four Noble Truths;
Suffering,
The cause of suffering,
The cessation of suffering,
The Noble Eightfold Path leading to
The cessation of suffering.
191. namely, suffering, the origin of suffering, the passing beyond suffering, and the Ariyan Eightfold Way leading to the pacification of suffering – 191. " Sorrow, the arising of sorrow, the cessation of sorrow, and the noble eightfold path which leads to their cessation." Dukkha, its causal arising, the overcoming of dukkha, and the Eight-fold Path that’s Noble leading to dukkha’s allaying.
# 14 192. This indeed is the safe refuge, this the refuge supreme. Having gone to such a refuge, one is released from all suffering. 192. This, indeed, is a safe refuge, the highest refuge. Having come to this refuge, one is liberated from all suffering. 192. This is the refuge safe, the sure retreat;
This only from our woes can us release.
192. That is the safe refuge, that is the best refuge; having gone to that refuge, a man is delivered from all pain. (192) This refuge is safe; this refuge is supreme. Having come to such a refuge, one will be free from all suffering. Such indeed is a refuge secure,
Such indeed is a refuge supreme.
To such a refuge should one go,
One is released from all sorrow.
192. (for him) this is a safe refuge, (for him) this is the best refuge. Having gone to such a refuge, one is released from all suffering. 192. Here truly is the gure sanctuary : here is the supreme sanctuary : here is the sanctuary where a man may go and cast aside his care. Such refuge is secure, such refuge is supreme. From all dukkha one is free unto that refuge gone.
# 15 193. Hard to find is the thoroughbred man (the Buddha); he is not born everywhere. Where such a wise man is born, that clan thrives happily. 193. One like the Buddha is hard to find; such a one is not born everywhere. Wherever those established in wisdom are born, the community flourishes. 193. Hard is that one of noble birth to find;
Not born in every land is He; the race
Wherein that Sage is born is prosperous.
193. An illumined person (a Buddha) is indeed very rare. He is not born everywhere. Wherever such a one takes birth, that family prospers. A truly thoroughbred man (a Buddha) is hard to find. He is not born anywhere, but where that seer is born, the people prosper. 193 193. A supernatural person (a Buddha) is not easily found, he is not born everywhere. Wherever such a sage is born, that race prospers. (193) Hard to find is a noble person. He is not born everywhere. Where is such a wise one born, that family prospers happily. Hard to find is the Man Supreme,
He is not born everywhere.
But where such a wise one is born,
That family thrives happily.
193. Hard to come by is the Ideal Man (purisajanna). He is not born everywhere. Where such a wise one is born, that family grows happy. 193. Hard to find is the Exalted One : he is not born in every place : happy dwells the household into which he, the wise one, is born : Hard to find the pure and noble who isn’t born just anywhere, wherever one so wise is born that family thrives happily. 15. It is hard to find a man of great wisdom: such a man is not born everywhere. Where such a wise man is born, that family thrives happily. (193)
# 16 194. Blessed is the birth of the Buddhas; blessed is the enunciation of the sacred Teaching; blessed is the harmony in the Order, and blessed is the spiritual pursuit of the united truth-seeker. 194. Blessed is the birth of the Buddha, blessed is the teaching of the Dhamma, blessed is the Saṅgha, where all live in harmony. 194. Blest is the rising of the Awakened Ones;
Blest is Their teaching of the Doctrine True;
Blest is the union of the Brotherhood;
And blest to dwell together in unity.
194. Blessed is the birth of the Buddhas; blessed is the discourse on the Noble Law; blessed is the harmony of the Community of Monks; blessed is the devotion of those living in brotherhood. Happy is the attainment of Buddhahood, happy the teaching of the true Teaching, happy is the concord of the Sangha, happy the training of those in concord. 194 194. Happy is the arising of the awakened, happy is the teaching of the True Law, happy is peace in the church, happy is the devotion of those who are at peace. (194) Happy is birth of the Awakened Ones. Happy is teaching of the True Dharma. Happy is unity of the Sangha. Happy is meditation of those in unity. Happy is the birth of the Buddha,
Happy is the preaching of the Sublime Dhamma,
Happy is the unity of the Sangha,
Happy is the striving of the united ones.
194. Happy is the appearance of the Enlightened Ones. Happy is the teaching of the Real Truth (saddhamma). Happy is the unity of the Spiritual Community. Happy is the spiritual effort of the united. 194. A blessing is the arising of Buddhas, a blessing is the true preaching. Blessed is the unity of the Sangha, blessed is the devotion of those who dwell in unity. Blessed is the birth of Buddhas, blest True Dhamma’s Teaching, blest the Sangha’s harmony and blessed is their striving. 16. Happy is the birth of Buddhas. Happy is the teaching of the Sublime Dharma. Happy is the unity of the Sangha. Happy is the discipline of the united ones. (194)
# 17 195-196. He who reveres those worthy of reverence, the Buddhas and their disciples, who have transcended all obstacles and passed beyond the reach of sorrow and lamentation -- he who reveres such peaceful and fearless ones, his merit none can compute by any measure. 195—196. When one pays homage to those who are worthy of homage — to the Buddha and His disciples, who have overcome obstacles (to the development of insight) and have rid themselves of sorrow and lamentation —, the merit gained by such a person cannot be measured by anyone as “this much” or “that much.” 195. The Awakened Ones and they that follow Them,
Worthy to be adored, have conquered all
The hosts of evil, crossed the flood of sorrow.
195, 196. He who pays homage to those who deserve homage, whether the Enlightened Ones or their disciples; he who has overcome the host of passions, and crossed the stream of grief and lamentations; he who pays homage to such as are emancipated and fearless — his merit cannot be measured. When a man venerates those worthy of veneration, be they Buddhas or their disciples, who have transcended all obstacles and passed beyond sorrow and tears -- venerating such as these, whose passions are extinguished and for whom there is no further source for fear, no one can calculate how great his merit is. 195, 196 195, 196. He who pays homage to those who deserve homage, whether the awakened (Buddha) or their disciples, those who have overcome the host (of evils), and crossed the flood of sorrow, he who pays homage to such as have found deliverance and know no fear, his merit can never be measured by anybody. (195) Who pays respects to those worthy of it, The Awakened Ones or their disciples, who have gone beyond obstacles and overcame grief and sorrow, [continued in 196]. He who venerates those venerable ones
Be they the Buddhas or disciples;
Those who have overcome obstacles
And gone beyond distress and lamentation;
Those who are serene and all-secure.
No one is able to calculate
His merit as such and such'.
195. He who reverences those worthy of reverence, whether Enlightened Ones or (their) disciples, (men) who have transcended illusion (papanca), and passed beyond grief and lamentation, 195, 196. Immeasurable is the merit of him who does reverence to those to whom reverence is due, Buddha and his disciples, men who have left behind them the trammels of evil, and crossed beyond the stream of sorrow and wailing, calmed and free of all fear. Who venerates the venerable Buddhas or their disciples, have overcome the manifold, grief and lamentation left. 17-18. He who pays reverence to those worthy of reverence, whether the Buddhas or their disciples, who has overcome the impediments and has got rid of grief and sorrow — his merit of paying reverence to such peaceful and fearless ones cannot be measured by anyone as such and such. (195-196)
# 18 196. Whoso shall worship Them, the worthy Ones,
In whom desires are quenched and fear allayed,
None can declare the merits of that man.
(196) [continued from 195]. Those who pay respects to such emancipated and fearless ones, nobody is able to calculate their merit as such and such. He who venerates those venerable ones
Be they the Buddhas or disciples;
Those who have overcome obstacles
And gone beyond distress and lamentation;
Those who are serene and all-secure.
No one is able to calculate
His merit as such and such'.
196. he who reverences those who are of such a nature, who (moreover) are at peace and without cause for fear, his merit is not to be reckoned as such and such. They who are ‘Thus’, venerable, cool and free from every fear - no one is able to calculate their merit as ‘just-so-much.
Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
XV Sukha
vagga
Happiness Happiness Happiness Happiness Happiness Happiness The Happiness Happiness Happiness Bliss Happiness Happiness
# 1 197. Happy indeed we live, friendly amidst the hostile. Amidst hostile men we dwell free from hatred. 197. Ah, happily do we live, indeed, not hating anyone among those who hate. Among those who hate, we live without hating anyone. 197. O happily we live
Angerless amid the angry!
O happily we spend our days
Amid the angry angerless!
197. Blessed indeed are we who live among those who hate, hating no one; amidst those who hate, let us dwell without hatred. Happy indeed we live who are free from hatred among those who still hate. In the midst of hate-filled men, we live free from hatred. 197 197. Let us live happily then, not hating those who hate us! among men who hate us let us dwell free from hatred! (197) Very happily indeed we live, free of hatred amongst hateful. Amongst hateful people we dwell without hatred. Happily indeed do we live
Unhating among those hating men.
Among many hate-filled men,
Thus we dwell unhating.
197. Happy indeed we live, friendly amid the haters. Among men who hate we dwell free from hate. 197. Joy ! We live in bliss ; amongst men of hate, hating none. Let us indeed dwell among them without hatred. We the unhating live happily midst the haters, among the hating humans from hatred dwell we free. 1. O let us live happily without hate amongst those who hate! Among men who hate, we dwell without hate. (197)
# 2 198. Happy indeed we live, friendly amidst the afflicted (by craving). Amidst afflicted men we dwell free from affliction. 198. Ah, happily do we live, indeed, never falling sick among those who are sick. We live without disease even among those who are ill. 198. O happily we live
In health amid the sickly ones!
O happily we spend our days
Amid the sickly ones in health!
198. Blessed indeed are we who live among those who are ailing, without ailments; amidst those who are so afflicted, let us live in good health. Happy indeed we live who are free from disease among those still diseased. In the midst of diseased men, we live free from disease. 198 198. Let us live happily then, free from ailments among the ailing! among men who are ailing let us dwell free from ailments! (198) Very happily indeed we live, healthy amongst diseased ones. Amongst diseased people we dwell healthy. Happily indeed do we live
Not yearning among those who yearn.
Among many yearning men,
Thus we dwell unyearning.
198. Happy indeed we live, healthy amid the sick. Among men who are sick we dwell free from sickness. 198. Joy! In bliss we dwell; healthy amidst the ailing. Let us indeed dwell amongst them in perfect health. We who are healthy live happily midst the unhealthy, among unhealthy humans from ill-health dwell we free. 2. O let us live happily in good health amongst those who are ill! Among men who are ill, we dwell in good health. (198)
# 3 199. Happy indeed we live, free from avarice amidst the avaricious. Amidst the avaricious men we dwell free from avarice 199. Ah, happily do we live, indeed, never yearning for sense pleasures among those who yearn for them. We live without yearning even among those who yearn. 199. O happily we live
Free from greed amid the greedy!
O happily we spend our days
Amid the greedy free from greed!
199. Blessed indeed are we who live among those who are yearning for sense delights, without yearning for such things; amidst those who are yearning for sense delights, let us dwell without yearning. Happy indeed we live who are free from worry among those who are still worried. In the midst of worried men, we live free from worry. 199 199. Let us live happily then, free from greed among the greedy! among men who are greedy let us dwell free from greed! (199) Very happily indeed we live, without greed amongst greedy ones. Amongst greedy people we dwell without greed. Happily indeed do we live
Not anxious among those anxious men.
Among many anxious men,
Thus we dwell unanxious.
199. Happy indeed we live, content amid the greedy. Among men who are greedy we dwell free from greed. 199. Yea in very bliss we dwell : free from care amidst the careworn. Let us indeed dwell amongst them without care. We the unfrenzied live happily midst the frenzied, among the frenzied humans from frenzy dwell we free. 3. O let us live happily without craving (to sensual pleasures) amongst those who crave. Among men who crave, we dwell without craving. (199)
# 4 200. Happy indeed we live, we who possess nothing. Feeders on joy we shall be, like the Radiant Gods. 200. Ah, happily do we live, indeed, free from impurities. We live in happiness, like the gods of the Radiant Realm. 200. O happily we live
Who have not anything at all!
Like ever-radiant gods above,
Our food immortal joys shall be.
200. Happy indeed are we who live without possessions. Let us feed on happiness, like the radiant gods (who feed on spiritual bliss). Happy indeed we live who have nothing of our own. We shall feed on joy, just like the radiant devas. 200 200. Let us live happily then, though we call nothing our own! We shall be like the bright gods, feeding on happiness! (200) Very happily indeed we live, who have nothing whatsoever. We will be feeding on joy, just like the Radiant Gods. Happily indeed do we live -
We that call nothing our own.
Feeders on joy shall we be
Even as the Abhassara gods.
200. Happy indeed we live, we for whom there are no possessions (kincanas). Feeders on rapture shall we be, like the gods of Brilliant Light. 200. In bliss we dwell possessing nothing : let us dwell feeding upon joy like the shining ones in their splendour. We for whom there’s nought live indeed so happily, joy-stained we’ll be like resplendent gods. 4. O let us live happily without impediments. Let us feed on joy, like the gods of the Radiant Realm. (200)
# 5 201. Victory begets enmity; the defeated dwell in pain. Happily the peaceful live, discarding both victory and defeat. 201. Conquest breeds hatred, for the conquered live in sorrow. Those who are peaceful live happily, having renounced both conquest and defeat. 201. Hate follows victory;
Conquered ones sit sorrowing.
But the calm live blissfully,
Renouncing conquest and defeat.
201. Victory breeds enmity; the vanquished one dwells in sorrow; the composed person lives happily, disregarding both victory and defeat. A victor only breeds hatred, while a defeated man lives in misery, but a man at peace within lives happily, abandoning up ideas of victory and defeat. 201 201. Victory breeds hatred, for the conquered is unhappy. He who has given up both victory and defeat, he, the contented, is happy. (201) Victory produces hatred. Defeated one dwells in pain. Tranquil one dwells happily, having renounced both victory and defeat. The victor begets hate,
While the defeated lives in distress.
Happily the peaceful lives,
Having given up victory and defeat.
201. Victory begets hatred, (for) the defeated one experiences suffering. The tranquil one experiences happiness, giving up (both) victory and defeat. 201. The victor breeds enmity ; the conquered sleeps in sorrow. Regardless of either victory or defeat the calm man dwells in peace. Victory gives rise to hate, those defeated lie in pain, happily rest the Peaceful surrendering victory-defeat. 5. Victory breeds hatred. The defeated live in pain. Giving up victory and defeat, one will live in peace and happiness. (201)
# 6 202. There is no fire like lust and no crime like hatred. There is no ill like the aggregates (of existence) and no bliss higher than the peace (of Nibbana). 202. There is no fire like lust, no vice like hatred, no sorrow like the burden of the aggregates, no happiness higher than the peace of nibbāna. 202. There is no fire like lust;
No sin brings such ill-luck as hate;
No pains so great as body's pains;
No bliss is like the perfect Calm.
202. There is no fire like passion; there is no blemish like hatred; there is no suffering like physical existence (the five aggregates or skandhas) and there is no bliss equal to the calm (of nirvana). There is no fire like desire. There is no weakness like anger. There is no suffering like the khandhas. There is no happiness greater than peace. 202 202. There is no fire like passion; there is no losing throw like hatred; there is no pain like this body; there is no happiness higher than rest. (202) There is no fire like passion. There is no evil like hatred. There is no suffering like the Aggregates of existence. There is no h No fire is there like dust,
No crime like hatred,
No ill like the Five Aggregates,
No higher bliss than Nibbana's peace.
202. There is no fire like lust, no blemish like demerit (kali), no suffering like the taking up of the (five) constituents (of conditioned existence), no happiness like peace. 202. There is no fire like lust ; no luck so bad as hate. There is no sorrow like existence : no bliss greater than Nirvana [rest]. There’s no fire like lust, no evil like aversion, no dukkha like the aggregates, no higher bliss than Peace. 6. There is no fire like lust, no evil like hate. There is no ill like the body (disharmony of the five Skandhas), no bliss higher than Nirvana. (202)
# 7 203. Hunger is the worst disease, conditioned things the worst suffering. Knowing this as it really is, the wise realize Nibbana, the highest bliss. 203. No disease is worse than hunger, no suffering is worse than attachment to compound things. Those who are wise, knowing these things as they really are, realize nibbāna, the highest happiness. 203. Hunger's the greatest plague,
Embodied life the greatest woe;
Whoso knows this in truth, can say:
"Nibbāna is the Bliss Supreme."<
203. Greed is the worst of afflictions; mental and emotional tendencies are the greatest of sorrows. Having perceived this fact truly, one realizes nirvana, the highest bliss. Hunger is the supreme disease. Mental activity is the supreme suffering. When one has grasped this as it really is, nirvana is the supreme happiness. 203 203. Hunger is the worst of diseases, the body the greatest of pains; if one knows this truly, that is Nirvana, the highest happiness. (203) Hunger is the highest illness. Conditioned things are the highest suffering. Having known this as it is, Nirvana is the highest happiness. Off all diseases hunger is the greatest,
Of all pains the compound things,
Knowing this (the wise realize Nibbana)
Which is the bliss supreme.
203. Hunger is the worst disease, conditioned existence the worst suffering. Knowing this as it really is (one realizes that) Nirvana is the highest happiness. 203. Hunger is the greatest ill : existence is the greatest sorrow. Sure knowledge of this is Nirvana, highest bliss. Hunger is the greatest ill, the greatest dukkha - conditionedness, knowing this reality at it is: Nibbana bliss supreme. 7. Hunger is the greatest disease. Skandhas are the greatest illness. Knowing this as it really is, (the wise man realizes) Nirvana, the supreme bliss. (203)
# 8 204. Health is the most precious gain and contentment the greatest wealth. A trustworthy person is the best kinsman, Nibbana the highest bliss. 204. Health is the greatest gift, contentment is the greatest wealth, the trustworthy are the best kinsmen, nibbāna is the greatest happiness. 204. Health is the greatest gain;
Contentment is the greatest wealth;
Best kinsman is the trusty friend;
Nibbāna is the Bliss Supreme.

204. Health is the greatest of gifts, contentment the greatest of riches; trust is the finest of relationships and nirvana the highest bliss. Health is the supreme possession. Contentment is the supreme wealth. A trustworthy friend is the supreme relation. Nirvana is the supreme happiness. 204 204. Health is the greatest of gifts, contentedness the best riches; trust is the best of relationships, Nirvana the highest happiness. (204) Health is the highest gain. Contentment is the highest wealth. Trusted people are the best relatives. Nirvana is the highest happiness. Health is the highest gain,
Contentment is the greatest wealth,
Trustful are the best kinsmen,
Nibbana is the highest bliss.
204. Health is the highest gain, contentment the greatest riches. The trustworthy are the best kinsmen, Nirvana is the supreme happiness. 204. Health is the greatest boon ; content is the greatest wealth ; a loyal friend is the truest kinsman ; Nirvana is the Supreme Bliss. Health’s the greatest gain, contentment, best of wealth, trusting’s best of kin, Nibbana bliss supreme. 8. Health is the highest gain. Contentment is the greatest wealth. The trusty ones are the best friends. Nirvana is the highest bliss. (204)
# 9 205. Having savored the taste of solitude and peace (of Nibbana), pain-free and stainless he becomes, drinking deep the taste of the bliss of the Truth. 205. Having tasted solitude and the peace of nibbāna, those who drink in the joy of the essence of the Dhamma become free from fear and evil. 205. Who tastes the savour sweet
Of solitude, who drinks of calm,
Is free from terror, free from sin,
Draining the nectar of the Norm.
205. Having tasted the sweetness of solitude and of inner tranquillity, he becomes free of woe and sin, enjoying the sweetness of the bliss of the Dhamma. After enjoying the taste of solitude and the taste of peace, one is freed from distress and evil, as one enjoys the taste of spiritual joy. 205 205. He who has tasted the sweetness of solitude and tranquillity, is free from fear and free from sin, while he tastes the sweetness of drinking in the law. (205) Having drunk the nectar of solitude and the nectar of tranquility, one is free of fear and free of evil, drinking the nectar of the joy of Dharma. Having tasted the flavour of
Seclusion and Nibbana's peace,
Woesless and stainless becomes he,
Drinking the taste of the Dhamma's joy.
205. Having enjoyed the flavour of solitude and tranquillity, free from sorrow and free from sin, one enjoys the rapturous flavour of the Truth (dhamma). 205. Having tasted the joy of solitude and of serenity, a man is freed from sorrow and from sin, and tastes the nectar of piety. Having drunk of solitude and tasted Peace Sublime, free from sorrow, evil-free, one drinks of Dhamma’s joy. 9. When a man tastes the flavor of seclusion and the flavor of quietness, he is then free from anguish and stain, enjoying the taste of the Dharma. (205)
# 10 206. Good is it to see the Noble Ones; to live with them is ever blissful. One will always be happy by not encountering fools. 206. It is good to see the Noble Ones — it is always a pleasure to be in their company. It is also always a pleasure not to be in the company of the immature. 206. 'Tis good to see the saints;
To dwell with them is blessedness;
If he should never fools behold,
A man could dwell in happiness.
206. Glorious is it to see the Noble Ones; their company at all times brings happiness; by not seeing the spiritually ignorant, one will always be happy. It is good to meet with the saints. Living with them is always sweet. By not meeting fools one can be happy all the time. 206 206. The sight of the elect (Arya) is good, to live with them is always happiness; if a man does not see fools, he will be truly happy. (206) Good is seeing the Noble Ones; association with them is always happy. By not seeing fools on would always be happy. Good is it to see the Noble Ones,
To dwell with them is happiness,
By not seeing foolish men,
One may ever be happy.
206. Good it is to see the spiritually developed (ariyas); to (actually) dwell with them is always happiness. By not seeing the spiritually immature, one indeed will be perpetually happy. 206. Good is the vision of the Noble ; good is their company. He may be always happy who escapes the sight of fools. So fair’s the sight of Noble Ones, ever good their company, by relating not to fools ever happy one may be. 10. It is the joy to see the Ariyas, and to be with them is ever happy. If one were never to see the foolish, one may ever be happy. (206)
# 11 207. Indeed, he who moves in the company of fools grieves for longing. Association with fools is ever painful, like partnership with an enemy. But association with the wise is happy, like meeting one's own kinsmen. 207. Those who associate with the immature grieve for a long time. Keeping company with the immature is always painful — it is like going on a long journey with an enemy. The company of the wise is joyful, like being reunited with one’s relatives. 207. The company of fools
Ne'er fails to bring distress.
To live with fools brings suffering,
As living with an enemy,
But wise men's company brings bliss,
As being with dear relatives.
207. He who leads a life in the company of fools suffers long; it is as painful to live with fools as it is with a foe; association with the wise brings happiness as does the company of one's kinsfolk. A man who keeps company with a fool, will suffer for it a long time. It is always painful to live with fools, like with an enemy, but a wise man is good to live with, like meeting up with relatives. 207 207. He who walks in the company of fools suffers a long way; company with fools, as with an enemy, is always painful; company with the wise is pleasure, like meeting with kinsfolk. (207) One who lives together with fools will suffer for a long time. The company of fools is always painful - like the company of an enemy. And a wise one is pleasant to live with, like meeting with relatives. Frequenting the company of fools
One surely grieves for long;
For association with fools is ever ill
Just as ever that of foes.
But to dwell with the wise is happiness
Just as relatives together meet.
207. By living in company with the spiritually immature one grieves for a long time. Association with the spiritually immature is always painful, like association with an enemy. Association with the wise is pleasant, like the coming together of relatives. 207. He who consorts with fools knows lasting grief. Grievous is the company of fools, as that of enemies ; glad is the company of the wise, as that of kinsfolk. Who moves among fool’s company must truly grieve for long, for ill the company of fools as ever that of foes, but weal’s a wise one’s company as meeting of one’s folk. 11. Certainly, one moves in company with fools grieves for a long time, and is ever painful as with a foe. It is happy to be associated with the wise, even like the joy of meeting a beloved kinsman. (207)
# 12 208. Therefore, follow the Noble One, who is steadfast, wise, learned, dutiful and devout. One should follow only such a man, who is truly good and discerning, even as the moon follows the path of the stars. 208. Therefore, one should associate with the wise, who are virtuous, dutiful, noble, learned, and steadfast. Keep company with them, as the moon moves among the stars. 208. If one be good and wise,
Well-versed in lore profound,
Long-suffering, dutiful, a saint,
Righteous and wise; if such there be,
Follow his footsteps, as the moon
Follows the path of the stars.
208. Therefore, one should follow the steadfast, the wise, the educated, the self-reliant, the dutiful and the noble. Even as the moon follows the path of the stars, so ought one to follow such a virtuous and highly intelligent man. Therefore, if he is a man of understanding and penetration, learned and habitually moral, devout and noble, one should cultivate the company of that just and wise man, in the same way as the moon keeps to a path among the stars. 208 208. Therefore, one ought to follow the wise, the intelligent, the learned, the much enduring, the dutiful, the elect; one ought to follow a good and wise man, as the moon follows the path of the stars. (208) Therefore: Clever and wise and learned, virtuous, devout and noble - associate with such a smart true person, just like the moon follows the path of the stars. Therefore --
Him the intelligent, the wise, the learned,
The devout, the dutiful and the Noble one -
Such a wise and intelligent man
Should one ever follow
As the moon follows the track of stars.
208. (Therefore it is said:) Follow one who is wise, understanding, and learned, who bears the yoke of virtue, is religious and spiritually developed (ariya). Follow one of such a nature, as the moon follows the path of the stars. 208. Therefore do thou consort with the wise, the sage, the learned, the noble ones who shun not the yoke of duty : follow in the wake of such a one, the wise and prudent, as the moon follows the path of the stars. Thus go with the steadfast, wise, well-versed, firm of virtue, practice-pure, Ennobled ‘Such’, who’s sound, sincere, as moon in wake of the Milky Way. 12. Therefore, if you find a man who is intelligent, wise, learned, enduring, responsible, and being Ariya, you should associate with a man of such virtue and intellect, just like the moon (follows) the path of stars. (208)
Ch. number
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Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
XVI Piya
vagga
Affection Pleasures Affections Affection Preference Pleasure Affection Affections Affections Affection Affection Affection
# 1 209. Giving himself to things to be shunned and not exerting where exertion is needed, a seeker after pleasures, having given up his true welfare, envies those intent upon theirs. 209. Do not run after sense pleasures and neglect the practice of meditation. If you forsake the practice of morality, concentration, and insight and get caught up in the pleasures of the world, you will come to envy those who put meditation first. 209. He who applies his mind unworthily,
Neglecting discipline,
Forsakes the goal and clings to things beloved,
Then envies those to meditation given.
209. He who gives himself to what is not befitting and thus forgets his own quest; he who indulges in sense pleasures envies the person who exerts himself in meditation. He who applies himself to what is not really an appropriate subject for application, and fails to apply himself to what is, missing the real purpose to grasp after what appeals to him, may well envy the man who does apply himself. 209 209. He who gives himself to vanity, and does not give himself to meditation, forgetting the real aim (of life) and grasping at pleasure, will in time envy him who has exerted himself in meditation. (209) Undertaking what is not to be undertaken, not undertaking what is to be undertaken, having renounced spiritual welfare; one grasping after the pleasant envies one who is pursuing the purification of mind. Exerting oneself in what should be shunned,
Not exerting where one should exert,
Rejecting the good and grasping at the pleasant,
One comes to envy those who exert themselves.
209. Devoting himself to the unbefitting and not devoting himself to the fitting, he, rejecting the (truly) good and grasping the (merely) pleasant, envies those who are devoted to the (truly) good. 209. He who gives himself to vanity and not to the truly profitable, shunning the true pursuit, and grasping at pleasure, will come to envy him who has sought the true profit. One makes an effort where none’s due with nothing done where effort’s due, one grasps the dear, gives up the Quest envying those who exert themselves. 1. One who does what should not be done, and fails to do what should be done, who gives up the quest and pursues the sensual pleasures, will envy the people who devote themselves in cultivation of Way. (209)
# 2 210. Seek no intimacy with the beloved and also not with the unloved, for not to see the beloved and to see the unloved, both are painful. 210. Seeing those whom you hold dear brings pleasure, while not seeing them brings pain. Seeing those whom you do not hold dear brings pain, while not seeing them brings pleasure. Therefore, associate with neither, and go beyond both pleasure and pain. 210. Join not thyself to things beloved or loathed.
To lack dear company,
To be with those we loathe, brings misery.
210. Do not become attached to what is pleasing nor to what is displeasing; not to see what is dear to one is painful, as also is the sight of the unpleasant. Never have anything to do with likes and dislikes. The absence of what one likes is painful, as is the presence of what one dislikes. 210 210. Let no man ever look for what is pleasant, or what is unpleasant. Not to see what is pleasant is pain, and it is pain to see what is unpleasant. (210) Don't associate with the dear ones, and never with those who are unloved. Not seeing the dear ones is suffering - and seeing the unloved ones. Be not attached to the beloved
And never with the unbeloved.
Not to meet the beloved is painful
As also to meet with the unbeloved.
210. Don’t associate with the dear, and never with the undear. Not seeing those who are dear is painful, (as is) seeing those who are not dear. 210. Let no man cleave to what is pleasant or unpleasant : parting with the pleasant is pain, and painful is the presence of the unpleasant. Don’t consort with dear ones at any time, nor those not dear, ‘is dukkha not to see the dear, ‘tis dukkha seeing those not dear. 2. Never cling to what is dear and what is not dear. Not seeing what is dear and seeing what is not dear, are both painful. (210)
# 3 211. Therefore hold nothing dear, for separation from the dear is painful. There are no bonds for those who have nothing beloved or unloved. 211. Therefore, do not get selfishly attached to anyone or anything, for separation from whomever or whatever you hold dear will bring you pain. There are no bonds for those who hold no person or thing dear or not dear 211. Seek not for love; things loved when lost bring woe;
Both are impermanent.
They have no bonds who dwell indifferent.
211. Therefore, let no one cherish anything, inasmuch as the loss of what is beloved is hard. There are no fetters for him who knows neither pleasure nor pain. Therefore don't take a liking to anything. To lose what one likes is hard, but there are no bonds for those who have no likes and dislikes. 211 211. Let, therefore, no man love anything; loss of the beloved is evil. Those who love nothing and hate nothing, have no fetters. (211) Therefore, do not hold anything dear; separation from the dear ones is bad. There are no bonds for those, for whom there is nothing dear or unloved. Therefore hold nothing dear,
For separation from the beloved is painful.
There are no bonds for those
To whom nothing is dear or not dear.
211. Therefore let nothing be dear to you, for separation from the dear is (experienced as an) evil. There exist no bonds for those for whom there is neither the dear nor the undear. 211. Take a liking to nothing ; loss of the prize is evil. There are no bonds for him who has neither likes nor dislikes. Others then do not make dear for hard’s the parting from them. For whom there is no dear, undear in them no bonds are found. 3. Hence hold nothing dear, for separation from what is dear is bad. There are no bonds for those to whom nothing is dear or not dear. (211)
# 4 212. From endearment springs grief, from endearment springs fear. From him who is wholly free from endearment there is no grief, whence then fear? 212. Endearment brings grief; endearment brings fear. For those who are free from endearment, there is neither grief nor fear. 212. Sorrow and fear are born of things beloved.
From things beloved set free,
How canst thou sorrow? fearful how canst be?
212. From pleasure arises sorrow; from pleasure arises fear. To him who is free from pleasure there is no sorrow. Whence, then, comes fear? From preference arises sorrow, from preference arises fear, but he who is freed from preference has no sorrow and certainly no fear. 212 212. From pleasure comes grief, from pleasure comes fear; he who is free from pleasure knows neither grief nor fear. (212) From affection, grief is born. From affection, fear is born. One freed from affection has no grief, whence fear? From endearment springs grief,
From endearment springs fear;
For him who is free from endearment
There is neither grief nor fear.
212. From the dear arises grief; from the dear arises fear. For the one who is wholly free from the dear there exists no grief. Whence (should) fear (come)? 212. From attachment comes grief, from attachment comes fear. He who is pure from attachment knows neither grief nor fear. From endearment grief is born, from endearment fear, one who is endearment-free has no grief - how fear. 4. Grief arises from what is dear; fear arises from what is dear. For someone who is wholly free from endearment, there is no grief, much less fear. (212)
# 5 213. From affection springs grief, from affection springs fear. From him who is wholly free from affection there is no grief, whence then fear? 213. Affection brings grief; affection brings fear. For those who are free from affection, there is neither grief nor fear. 213. From things held dear, sorrow and fear are born.
Set free from things held dear,
How canst thou sorrow have? how canst have fear?
213. From affection arises sorrow; from affection arises fear. To him who is free from affection there is no sorrow. Whence fear? From affection arises sorrow, from affection arises fear, but he who is freed from affection has no sorrow and certainly no fear. 213 213. From affection comes grief, from affection comes fear; he who is free from affection knows neither grief nor fear. (213) From love, grief is born. From love, fear is born. One freed from love has no grief, whence fear? From love springs grief,
From love springs fears;
For him who is free from love
There is neither grief nor fear.
213. From affection (pema) arises grief; from affection arises fear. For one who is wholly free from affection there exists no grief. Whence (should) fear (come)? 213. From affection come grief and fear. He who is without affection knows neither grief nor fear. From affection grief is born, from affection fear, one who is affection-free has no grief - how fear? TEXT NOT AVAILABLE
# 6 214. From attachment springs grief, from attachment springs fear. From him who is wholly free from attachment there is no grief, whence then fear? 214. Selfish attachment brings grief; selfish attachment brings fear. For those who are free from selfish attachment, there is neither grief nor fear. 214. Sorrow and fear are children born of pleasure.
No longer pleasure's slave,
How canst thou sorrow, fear how canst thou have?
214. From attachment arises sorrow; from attachment arises fear. To him who is free from attachment there is no sorrow. Whence fear? From pleasure arises sorrow, from pleasure arises fear, but he who is freed from pleasure has no sorrow and certainly no fear. 214 214. From lust comes grief, from lust comes fear; he who is free from lust knows neither grief nor fear. (214) From attachment, grief is born. From attachment, fear is born. One freed from attachment has no grief, whence fear? From attachment springs grief,
From attachment springs fear;
For him who is free from attachment
There is neither grief nor fear.
214. From (sensual) enjoyment (rati) arises grief; from (sensual) enjoyment arises fear. For one who is wholly free from (sensual) enjoyment there is no grief. Whence (should) fear (come)? 214. From pleasure come grief and fear. He who is freed from pleasure knows neither grief nor fear. From lustfulness arises grief, from lustfulness springs fear, one wholly free of lustfulness has no grief - how fear? 6. Grief arises from attachment; fear arises from attachment. For someone who is wholly free from attachment, there is no grief, much less fear. (214)
# 7 215. From lust springs grief, from lust springs fear. From him who is wholly free from craving there is no grief; whence then fear? 215. Lust brings grief; lust brings fear. For those who are free from lust, there is neither grief nor fear. 215. Sorrow and fear are children of desire.
From all desire set free,
How canst thou sorrow? fearful how canst be?
215. From desire arises sorrow, from desire arises fear. To him who is free from desire there is no sorrow. Whence fear? From sensuality arises sorrow, from sensuality arises fear, but he who is freed from sensuality has no sorrow and certainly no fear. 215 215. From love comes grief, from love comes fear; he who is free from love knows neither grief nor fear. (215) From pleasure, grief is born. From pleasure, fear is born. One freed from pleasure has no grief, whence fear? From lust springs grief,
From lust springs fear;
For him who is free from lust
There is neither grief nor fear.
215. From (lustful) desire (kama) arises grief; from (lustful) desire (kama) arises fear. For one who is wholly free from (lustful) desire there is no grief. Whence (should) fear (come)? 215. From lust come grief and fear. He who is freed from lust 'knows neither grief nor fear, From attachment grief is born, from attachment fear, one who is attachment-free has no grief - how fear? 7. Grief arises from lust; fear arises from lust. For someone who is wholly free from lust, there is no grief, much less fear. (215)
# 8 216. From craving springs grief, from craving springs fear. From him who is wholly free from craving there is no grief; whence then fear? 216. Craving brings grief; craving brings fear. For those who are free from craving, there is neither grief nor fear. 216. Sorrow and fear are things of longing born.
From longing if thou part,
Thou hast no fear nor sorrow in thine heart.
216. From craving arises sorrow; from craving arises fear. To him who is free from craving there is no sorrow. Whence fear? From craving arises sorrow, from craving arises fear, but he who is freed from craving has no sorrow and certainly no fear. 216 216. From greed comes grief, from greed comes fear; he who is free from greed knows neither grief nor fear. (216) From thirst, grief is born. From thirst, fear is born. One freed from thirst has no grief, whence fear? From craving springs grief,
From craving springs fear;
For him who is free from craving
There is neither grief nor fear.
216. From craving arises grief; from craving arises fear. For one who is wholly free from craving there is no grief. Whence (should) fear (come)? 216. From desire come grief and fear. He who is free of desire knows neither grief nor fear. Out of craving grief is born, out of craving fear, one fully freed of craving has no grief - how fear? 8. Grief arises from craving; fear arises from craving. For someone who is wholly free from craving, there is no grief, much less fear. (216)
# 9 217. People hold dear him who embodies virtue and insight, who is principled, has realized the truth, and who himself does what he ought to be doing. 217. Those who are endowed with virtue and insight, who are established in the Dhamma, who have realized the Truths, and who fulfill their own duties, win the respect of all the world. 217. Upright and Norm-abiding, speaking truth,
Who minds his own affair,
That is the man whom every one holds dear.
217. He who possesses virtue and spiritual insight, who is well established in the Dhamma, who is truthful, who performs his duties, him the people hold dear. Well may people hold dear the man who is endowed with morality and insight, who is well established in righteousness, a seer of the truth, and applying himself to his own business. 217 217. He who possesses virtue and intelligence, who is just, speaks the truth, and does what is his own business, him the world will hold dear. (217) People hold dear the one, who is endowed with virtue and seeing, righteous, knowing the truth and is doing what should be done. He who is perfect in virtue and insight,
Is established in the Dhamma;
Who speaks the truth and fulfills his own duty -
Him do people hold dear.
217. People hold him dear who is perfect in right conduct (sila) and vision (dassana), who is principled (dhammattha) and a speaker of the truth, and who carries out his own (spiritual) tasks. 217. The man of counsel and insight, of righteousness and truth, who minds his own affairs, him the crowd holds dear. Perfect in virtue and insight, firm in Dhamma, knower of Truth, dear to the people’s such a one who does what should be done. 9. Whoever has virtue and insight, and cultivates with Dharma realizes the Truths and fulfils his own duties — all people hold dear to him. (217)
# 10 218. One who is intent upon the Ineffable (Nibbana), dwells with mind inspired (by supramundane wisdom), and is no more bound by sense pleasures -- such a man is called "One Bound Upstream." 218. Those who have developed a desire to know the unconditioned, whose minds are thrilled with a desire to reach that state, and who are no longer attached to the sensory world, are known as those who are "headed upstream". 218. In whom is longing for the Nameless born,
Whose mind It hath enthralled,
Whose thoughts no longer are by passion torn,
That man "a Climber of the Stream" is called.
218. He in whom is born a sublime longing for the Ineffable, whose mind is permeated by this longing, whose thoughts are not bewildered by attachment — such a person is called "one bound upstream." He whose longing has been aroused for the indescribable, whose mind has been quickened by it, and whose thought is not attached to sensuality is truly called one who is bound upstream. 218 218. He in whom a desire for the Ineffable (Nirvana) has sprung up, who is satisfied in his mind, and whose thoughts are not bewildered by love, he is called urdhvamsrotas (carried upwards by the stream). (218) Who is intent on The Indescribable, who has an expanded mind, whose mind is not bound to sense-pleasures, he is called "going against the current". He who has developed a wish for Nibbana,
He whose mind is thrilled (with the Three Fruits),
He whose mind is not bound by sensual pleasures,
Such a person is called Upstream-bound one'.
218. He is called ‘One whose stream goes upward’12 in whom is born an ardent aspiration (chanda) after the Undefined, whose mind (manasa) would be permeated (by the thrill of his progress so far), and whose heart (citta) is unattached to sensual pleasures. 218. If a man's heart be set upon the In- effable [Nirvana], his mind brought to perfection, and every thought freed from lust, he is called the strong swimmer who forges his way against the stream. One with a wish for the Undeclared, with mind so well-pervaded, a mind not bound in pleasures of sense, an ‘upstream-goer’s’ called. 10. He who has developed a wish for the infinite Nirvana, whose mind is thrilled (with the three fruits of sagehood), whose mind is not bound by material pleasures, such a person is called "uddham-soto" (he who goes upstream). (218)
# 11 219. When, after a long absence, a man safely returns from afar, his relatives, friends and well-wishers welcome him home on arrival. 219 - 220. As your family, friends, and well-wishers receive you with joy when you return home from a long journey, so will your good deeds receive you when you go from this life to the next, where they will be waiting for you with joy, like your kinsmen. 219. As when a dweller in some far-off land
Safe home returns at last,
Kin, friends and lovers waiting to greet him stand;
219. When a man who has been away for a long time returns home safely, his kinsmen, friends and well-wishers welcome him gladly. When a man who has been away a long time at last comes home safely from far away, his family, friends and acquaintances rejoice to see him back. In the same way, when a man who has done good goes from this world to the next, his good deeds receive him like relations welcoming a loved one back again. 219, 220 219. Kinsmen, friends, and lovers salute a man who has been long away, and returns safe from afar. (219) Relatives, companions and friends are happy about coming back of a person, long away from home, safely come back from far away, After a long absence a man comes home
Safe and sound from afar,
Kinsmen and freinds gladly welcome him.
219. When a man long absent (from home) returns safely from a distant place, his relatives, friends, and well-wishers rejoice exceedingly at his return. 219. When, after long voyaging afar, one returns in safety home, kinsfolk and friends receive him gladly ; One who’s long away from home returns in safety from afar, then friends, well-wishers, kinsmen too are overjoyed at his return. 11. A man long absent from home returns safely from afar, his kinsman, friends and well wishers rejoice at his return. (219)
# 12 220. As kinsmen welcome a dear one on arrival, even so his own good deeds will welcome the doer of good who has gone from this world to the next. 220. So, when a man on earth good deeds hath done,
When he hath passed beyond,
All his good deeds like kin, await that one.
220. When a man has departed from this world to the next, the effects of his good deeds receive him gladly, even as kinsmen welcome a friend on his return home. 220. In like manner his good works receive him who has done good, and has gone from this world to the other;--as kinsmen receive a friend on his return. (220) Thus, the good deeds receive the well-doer, gone from this world to the other one, just like relatives receive a beloved one, who has come back. Likewise, good deeds well receive the doer
Who has gone from here to the next world,
As kinsmen receive a dear friend on his return.
220. Similarly, his own good deeds receive him when he goes from this world to the other (world) as relatives (receive) a dear one on his return (home). 220. Even so his good deeds receive the good man, when he leaves this world for the next, as kinsfolk greet a dear traveller. In the same way, with merit done when from this world to another gone those merits then receive one there as relatives a dear one come. 12. Likewise, when one who has done good is gone from this world to the next, his good deeds receive him, like relatives receiving a returning loved one. (220)
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Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
XVII Kodha
vagga
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Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
XVIII Mala
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Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
XIX Dhammatha
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XX Magga
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XXI Pakinnaka
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XXII Niraya
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XXIII Naga
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XXIV Tanha
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verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
XXV Bhikkhu
vagga
vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga
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Ch. number
& name
verse subject
Verse Number within a Chapter Acariya Buddharakkhita Allan R. Bomhard F.L. Woodward Harischandra Kaviratna John Richards Max Mueller Miroslav Rozehnal Sathienpong Wannapok Sangharakshita Wagiswara & Saunders Weragoda Sarada Mahathera Narada Thera
XXVI Brahmana
vagga
vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga vagga
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